Podcasts about xanax

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A medication of the benzodiazepine type

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Best podcasts about xanax

Latest podcast episodes about xanax

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset
Learn my PSA Formula to Beating Procrastination no matter how Stuck or Stubborn you are EP353

ProjectME with Tiffany Carter – Entrepreneurship & Millionaire Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:07


Here's the truth and psychology behind your procrastinating… > You have to get X done and it's “super important > You promise yourself it will be at the top of your to-do list tomorrow. > Tomorrow comes and you are so overwhelmed about doing this thing that you start convincing yourself that you will “do it after______” before you know it, it's the end of the day, and you have zero energy for it.  > Then the guilt sets in that you didn't follow through, and it gets met with the anxiety that it has to get done, so you EXTRA promise yourself that “no excuses, I will get it done tomorrow!” > Once you finally do the damn thing in your last-minute crazy panic, you realize it didn't take you as long as you thought or as much energy, and you could have done it sooner.  Sound familiar???? Procrastination is a self-soothing behavior. Most procrastinators I've coached are over-thinkers and tend to have a good deal of anxiety and/or depression…in an innocent effort to give yourself some pressure relief, your let yourself off of the hook from doing the perceived painful or mind-numbing task until later.  This physically gives you a dopamine hit (the feel good calming neurotransmitter), literally give you a sigh of relief. That is…. until the new promised time comes to do the task, and then you either go for another dopamine hit, or the consequence is so high (ie. a late fee, pissed off client, etc…) you do the thing in a frantic state. What's interesting is this “frantic state,” is a form of negative excitement, which releases Cortisol (the stress hormone) and adrenaline, which gives a you a high in a different way, much like Cocaine or 20 espresso shots. I used to be addicted to this feeling!!!! Then after you actually complete this task that has caused weeks or days of anxiety, you nervous system basically crashes in order to recalibrate you in to a steady hormonal state, this can mimic an ultra relaxed and relieving feeling…like taking a Xanax. If you have been in this pattern for quite some time, if not your entire life, you're actually addicted to your own inner drug store that this procrastination loop causes.  Crazy right?!!! Knowing why you procrastinate isn't enough to get you to change or even manage the behavior…I know as I've struggled so much with this, that I've paid major consequences waiting until the 11th hour. So I came up with an action formula to manage this crazy-making behavior. In this podcast episode I'll take you though my simple PSA formula, so you can start being more productive today! FREE $5 GIFT CARD FOR EVERYONE who write a 5-star written Apple Podcast review of the show >>>> for A LIMITED TIME!  3 Simple Steps: Write a review Put your name or Instagram handle inside the review Take a screenshot of it and DM Tiffany on IG and she will personally give you a virtual “cheers” with a $5 gift card.  Welcome to ProjectME the Podcast with your host Tiffany Carter, who takes the mystery out of making BIG money? A former NBC and CBS TV journalist, turned multi-millionaire entrepreneur, teaching you all things wealth, health, worth, and business. You can follow Tiffany on Instagram @projectme_with_tiffany  on Facebook @projectmewithtiffany and watch her TV episodes on ProjectME TV with Tiffany Carter on YouTube. Subscribe to Tiffany's FREE weekly digest, The Secret Posse, and get exclusive content you won't find anywhere else: millionaire mindset exercises, custom weekly abundance affirmations, and her best money making tips.

Grieving Out Loud: A Mother Coping with Loss in the Opioid Epidemic

Janet Ropp's 19-year-old son, James, died October 13, 2018, from a Xanax overdose. James had struggled with addiction throughout his teenage years. He had been diagnosed with ADHD at a young age and his mother believes he was self-medicating with illicit drugs. Janet is marking the third anniversary of James' death by sharing what she has learned about grief and how to cope.  She took classes through the Grief Recovery Method and found comfort in the book Where Did You Go, by Christina Rasmussen.Support the show (https://www.emilyshope.foundation/donate-2)

Gurvey's Law
Up close & personal with former Divorce Court Judge Lynn Toler with Host Alan Gurvey and co-host Lauren Sivan

Gurvey's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:04


Here is the latest Gurvey's Law podcast that originally aired on September 30th on 790 KABC Talk Radio. In this episode, Alan and Lauren get up close and personal with former Divorce Court judge, the incomparable Lynn Toler. As Lauren says, talking with Lynn is like taking Xanax, but with some life lessons mixed in. Lynn talks about her books, career, and her personal life with all of the flair that you would expect from the beloved judge! #judge #court #talkradio #interview #author #divorce #tv #podcast

McNeil & Parkins Show
Parkins & Spiegel: Anxiety shared by White Sox & Bears fans (Hour 1)

McNeil & Parkins Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 19:16


Danny Parkins and Matt Spiegel opened their show by discussing how White Sox fans are anxious heading into what they hope is a deep playoff run. Along those lines, Bears fans are also anxious heading into what they hope is a successful starting debut for rookie quarterback Justin Fields on Sunday. Let's take a Xanax.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scraptitude
Diaz Blood Xanax

Scraptitude

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 66:10


Geoff and Tim talk contemporary combat sports with an emphasis on the newly announced World Fight League and UFC 266Twitter: Scraptitude (@Scraptitude)Geoffrey Aikens (@OhArd215)Tim Lewis (@TimothyELewis)Intro: Ameen Rahman (IG: @arobsmusic)Outro: No One Forgets Music (IG: @_NoFM)

The Art of Manliness
The Exercise Prescription for Depression and Anxiety

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:53


If you went to the doctor about treating your depression or anxiety, you might expect to be written a prescription for Zoloft or Xanax. But if you went in to see Dr. Jasper Smits, he might write you a different kind of prescription, one that instructed you to take a jog around the block. Dr. Smits is a professor and clinical psychologist, as well as the co-author of Exercise for Mood and Anxiety: Strategies for Overcoming Depression and Enhancing Well-Being. Today on the show we talk about why he likes using exercise as an option for patients who struggle with mood disorders, anxiety, and even general stress and anger, but don't want to do talk therapy or take a medication. We discuss how exercise has been found to be as effective for depression and anxiety as medication (and of course has a much better side effect profile), why it works, and whether a particular type of exercise is better for particular disorders. We then spend the rest of the conversation digging into the catch-22 that surrounds depression and exercise: if exercise is good for depression, but when you're depressed you don't feel like exercising, how do you find the motivation to get going with it? We discuss strategies for starting and sticking with exercise that can help not only those who struggle with mood disorders and anxiety, but anyone who is looking to make physical activity a habit. Check out the show notes at aom.is/exerciseformood See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Headgum Podcast
68: The Trader Joes Snacks Dinner-Steaks-Dal Croissantlet Tourna-Mint Chip Ice Cream of Hangry Victors

The Headgum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 53:57


Fellow Headgum podcaster Billy Bryk joins Amir, Faris, and Geoff to discuss ill airplane passengers, Xanax, and the best snacks from Trader Joe's.  BUY THE HEADGUM PODCAST MERCH! Advertise on The Headgum Podcast via Gumball.fm Rate The Headgum Podcast 5-stars on Apple Podcasts. Join the Headgum Discord. Check out our sponsor MyBookie See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Chasing Heroine: On This Day, Recovery Podcast
“Finding purpose through loss.” Julia, Oakland, CA Aug 2019

Chasing Heroine: On This Day, Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 70:13


Kim and Jeannine speak with Julia, aka @rehabgirlfriend, a popular TikTok recovery content creator, about her struggles with Xanax and alcohol, as well as a personal loss in her first experience with sobriety that led to a relapse, but ultimate gave her a stronger sense of her purpose and life and has helped her finding her way back to a path of healing and recovery.

The Bomb Hole
Alexis Roland | The Bomb Hole Episode 72

The Bomb Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 130:54


Filming for her first video part at age 9, this midwest child phenom was getting attention on the slopes before most of us could even link turns. We talk with Alexis about the importance of inclusion, the progression of women's snowboarding, perfectionism, fundamentals, not fitting in, mental health, park psychology, keeping a positive headspace, nature's Xanax, and so much more. At a young age, snowboarding began to feel like a job to her and after being dropped by a major sponsor, she felt like she lost her identity. In the past several years, she's hit a major resurgence and is again a contender against any rail rider, male or female. Join us on this weeks episode of The Bomb Hole to find out how she discovered her passion for the sport again, got new sponsors, won contests, filmed video parts, and carved her own path to get where she is today in the world of snowboarding.Special ThanksLiquid Death- https://liquiddeath.com/bombhole/Ten Barrel Pub Beer- https://10barrel.com/beer/pub-beer/Bubs Naturals- https://www.bubsnaturals.com promo code bombhole for 20% Off!The Patreon Members, We would not do this without you!!- https://www.patreon.com/thebombholeVolcom- https://www.volcom.com post a good bail on instagram and #volcombombproof @thebombholehttps://www.instagram.com/thebombhole/ @volcomsnow https://www.instagram.com/volcomsnow/ A Volcom rider will pick the best one each week and the winner will get a prize pack!!TowPro- https://www.towpro-lifts.com promo code bombhole for 5% OffInstagramAlexis Roland's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/AlexisRoland/@thebombhole: https://www.instagram.com/thebombhole...@Grendiesel : https://www.instagram.com/grendiesel/...@E_stone : https://www.instagram.com/e_stone/Hit Subscribe! Leave a comment, We love your feedback! If you like the show please leave us a review! It all helps us out a ton!!For all things Bomb Hole, go to : https://thebombhole.com/BOMB HOLE STORE: https://thebombhole.com/collections/allWatch the episode on YouTube- https://youtu.be/Sg4XBHsyE4QJoin The Bomb Squad on our Patreon page! Props to all of our Patreon members for the support. We could not make these episodes happen without your help! Patreon members get the chance to ask guests questions and find out who we will be interviewing before anyone else. They also receive Bomb Hole merch and a custom Bomb Squad sticker!!! Find out more at https://www.patreon.com/thebombholeShow Notes-Outliers Book | https://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017930Alexis Roland 2010 Edit | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWJVWqvDA6UPromote Inclusion In Sports | https://www.athleteassessments.com/6-ways-promote-inclusion-in-sport/The Champion Mind Set | https://www.amazon.com/Champion-Mindset-Athletes-Mental-Toughness/dp/1250096715Better Then Perfect | https://www.amazon.com/Better-than-Perfect-Strategies-Critic/dp/1580055494A Black Women's History Of The United States | https://www.amazon.com/Womens-History-United-ReVisioning-American/dp/0807033553Crash Course Black History Series | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPx5aRuWCtcDepression Help | https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/depressionAnxiety | https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323454Cognitive Behavioral Therapy | https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/patients-and-families/cognitive-behavioralMental Meeting | https://snowboardmag.com/stories/laura-rogoski-mental-health-and-recovering-from-injuryMedications | https://www.rethink.org/advice-and-information/living-with-mental-illness/medications/Its Tits 2021 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJajtDLXycMYoga With Adriene | https://www.youtube.com/user/yogawithadrieneThe Five Minute Journal | https://www.intelligentchange.com/products/the-five-minute-journalBig Snow American Dream | https://www.bigsnowamericandream.comThe Beastie Boys | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBsBHNqIh6sShort Notice | https://www.redbull.com/ca-en/short-notice-snowboard-filmBeyond The Boundaries | https://www.btbounds.comThanks for listening!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/thebombhole)

HELL HAS AN EXIT Podcast with Bryan Alzate
Ep 48: Shot Myself in The Foot, LITERALLY.- A Davie Story. ft. ALEX K.

HELL HAS AN EXIT Podcast with Bryan Alzate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 85:36


This week on Hell Has An Exit, Bryan Invites long time friend Alex K. on the show. Alex dives right into his story and gets vulnerable. He opens up about his traumas, and what led to him finally being able to overcome his addiction & alcoholism.  •Car accident  •Coma  •Jail •Shooting himself in the foot w/ a shotgun  •Xanax  •Little Blue Pills •Lean •Doctor Shopping •Alcohol •Probation  •4 DUI's •Motorcycle Accident  •Spending his first year of sobriety in prison  •Alcoholics Anonymous  •Rehab •Recovery Today, Alex has been clean & sober for over 7 years and lives a life beyond his wildest dreams by putting the work in. Don't miss this amazing story of recovery & success on THIS WEEK'S Hell Has An Exit! Watch the full video interview available on Youtube. Audio podcast available on all platforms  Link in Bio. For more information, please visit unitedrecoveryproject.com or call  tel: 833-999-1877 Follow on Instagram & Twitter @hellhasanexit @united_recovery @dbpodcasts Produced by dppodcast.com Music by Miles M. Davis.

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

In this episode I talk about how much hope I feel in A.A., despite the chaos that is in the world. My website.My Instagram. 

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.
Episode #238 - "Are You Open to the Idea That You Might Be Wrong?"

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 17:21


In this episode I talk about the willingness to being open to be wrong. www.sarcasticbigbook.com

Light After Trauma
Episode 59: Living With Your Head Detached From Your Body with Amy Guerrero

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 37:40


Amy Guerrero is a trauma-informed recovery coach helping people on their journey of sobriety and healing from trauma. In this episode, she talks with Alyssa about why it can be dangerous to tell people struggling with addiction to “just quit”. She also shares about her own battle with addiction and how addiction actually saved her life - at first! Tune in to hear Amy's incredible story as well as her unique approach to helping others heal via a fully somatic experience.  Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website Amy's Website:https://www.thriveinrecoverywithamy.com    Transcript: Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: [singing] Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hello, everybody, welcome. On the day that we are recording this, it is Friday and I am in a really good mood. Why? I don't know, because things are hectic, but I am, so we're going with it. I am really excited for today's episode. I am really excited for our guest today. We have with us Amy Guerrero. I'm just going to tell you a little bit about Amy before we get into it. Alyssa Scolari [00:55]: "When we stay curious together, we can experience unimaginable freedom." I love that quote. "On a journey to heal from my trauma, I stumbled, pun intended, into a conscious sober lifestyle and my deeper purpose to support people. Today, I support sober people to heal past traumas, to feel more freedom, pleasure, and purpose, and create healthy relationships and thrive. Alyssa Scolari [01:22]: I was confident no single approach to healing and living a conscious sober life would work for me, so why would it work for anyone else? I got busy educating myself, training and working with people in somatic experiencing, attachment theory and other trauma-informed modalities and relating it to living a conscious sober lifestyle. Alyssa Scolari [01:44]: What I discover is missing for my clients, who include all adults ready to create healthier relationships, is when we unravel the root causes of the addictive escape, such as grief, trauma, and painful events from the past, they discover the safety to live with purpose and thrive in all of their relationships. Alyssa Scolari [02:06]: Outside of running my coaching business, Thrive in Recovery, you can find me practicing what I teach, cooking healthy, delicious food, practicing yoga, playing outdoors, and strengthening my connection to myself to serve others." Alyssa Scolari [02:22]: I love that. Hi, Amy. Welcome. Amy Guerrero [02:26]: Thank you so much. It's so delightful to be here and all of our good moodiness is jiving off of each other because I too am having a great Friday. Alyssa Scolari [02:36]: Oh, that makes me so happy to hear that. Amy and I are moving buddies. Amy has just moved so we were talking about the process of moving before we started recording. Yeah. We're both vibing. Amy Guerrero [02:50]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [02:50]: Is there anything you want to add to that bio, or can I just get rolling? Amy Guerrero [02:56]: It's just- Alyssa Scolari [02:56]: Can I just start with my 21 questions? Amy Guerrero [02:58]: Just get started with your 21 questions. You said it all. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:04]: Can you define, for the listeners, what is somatic experiencing? What does that mean? Because I love that technique, but I don't think a lot of people really know what that means. Amy Guerrero [03:19]: Absolutely. I like to put things in very user-friendly words, so I'm not going to define it as maybe the Somatic Experiencing Institute would define it. I'm going to define it as Amy Guerrero defines it. Alyssa Scolari [03:31]: Of course. Amy Guerrero [03:31]: It's really, for me, as a conscious sober woman, before I became conscious I was really feeling my way through life. I was experiencing a lot of life through all of the sensation in my body, and everyone in the world doesn't experience that, or stops the sensation from happening. Then just tries to analyze and analyze and think and think and think. Amy Guerrero [03:57]: What somatic experience is, is really a bottom-up approach to mental health, mental wellness, and overall wellness. It's really going into the body to allow the body to complete things that happened, whether unconscious or conscious. For instance, with traumatic events or with grief, oftentimes we stuff it down and we put it away and we promise we're going to go back for it later. Amy Guerrero [04:26]: Then some kind of chronic inflammation shows up and it just won't go away. Often that's the body keeping the score, as Bessel would say, or telling us like, "Hey, there's something in here." So often it's an emotional piece. The somatics that I really practice in somatic experiencing that I practice for myself and my clients is like, "Hey, let's listen to what your body wants to tell us and then listen to what your mind is telling us about that." Amy Guerrero [04:52]: Really slowing it down. So often people who've experienced any escapism with drugs or alcohol, or even just the behaviors that are just highly palatable on the GABA receptors and the feel-good transmitters, they don't remember that they have a body because it's been drowned out by the heavy use of other things outside of themselves. That's my story too. Alyssa Scolari [05:18]: Yeah. That was going to be my next question, is, this is something that I feel like many people who struggle with addiction, and I also believe eating disorders, this is something that we do. We almost, metaphorically of course, are walking around with our heads detached from our bodies when we're in our addiction. Would you agree with that? Amy Guerrero [05:46]: Absolutely. Our heads get very manipulative and wise at the same sense, because it's all a protective mechanism. Our brains start to create all of the story that becomes so intense and it just won't stop. Amy Guerrero [06:03]: When I was working in eating disorder clinics, I was always just really watching the room instead of listening to every single word, because what I could see in their bodies would tell me the story in which they had calculated such a beautiful story in which most of it their body was telling me wasn't true. Right? Amy Guerrero [06:25]: Their head was like, "Oh, no, this is exactly what's happening." It's so true. It's a protective mechanism. I don't think there's anything wrong or right about it. It makes sense. Alyssa Scolari [06:39]: Absolutely. I think that for some people that's truly where they need to be, because it's one of those things where maybe if we were fully in tune, we would lose it. It is, as you said, a protective measure. I believe it's a survival mechanism. Amy Guerrero [06:54]: Absolutely. Alyssa Scolari [06:55]: It keeps us alive. Amy Guerrero [06:57]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [06:58]: In a way ... And this might sound like a twisted sentence, but sometimes our addiction is what keeps us alive. Amy Guerrero [07:05]: Oh, if I didn't start using drugs and alcohol when I did, I think I would have been suicidal much sooner in my life than when I was. I mean, my first MDMA experience was a life-changer. I believe I used it in this very beautiful way where I had journals and all of the things and just really got to the matter of what was really bothering me. Amy Guerrero [07:27]: I believe that those experiences, although then I would use them in ways that weren't necessarily therapeutic for me, but if I didn't use the way I did, I don't think I'd be here now. Because at the end of my using, when that coping mechanism was taken away from me, I tried to kill myself for almost 18 months. Alyssa Scolari [07:46]: Yes. I am so appreciative of the fact that you shared that, because not only are you speaking some really hard and wise truth about addiction, but in saying what you just said, which is drugs and alcohol essentially helped to keep me alive, you are taking the shame off of it and the guilt and the stigma as well, because there's such a stigma, right? We know about stigma. Alyssa Scolari [08:15]: We could talk about that all day, but when you look at it as like, "I needed this to survive." There are so many people who carry so much guilt and shame from years when they had addiction and they struggled, but when you reframe it and you look at it as what it was, which was you just trying to survive, I feel like it takes a lot of that guilt and shame away. Amy Guerrero [08:39]: A hundred percent. That was what I struggled with at first, because I wasn't being met where I was at. The people that were trying to support me ... I had started working on my trauma before I became physically dependent on alcohol. About halfway through my journey, I met my birth mom and then that's when my alcohol use just went up and up. Amy Guerrero [09:04]: My coping mechanisms, I really leaned into them, but I was on this journey to heal all my trauma by the time I was 40 and I just giggle at myself now because that's so my personality. Like, "I'm going to figure all of this out before I'm 40 because I'm going to walk into my 40 totally freaking healed and have it all figured out." Amy Guerrero [09:24]: Instead, I'm waking up shaking and going, "Wait, you cannot take away my favorite coping mechanism. What the actual fuck is going to happen now?" People were trying to tell me that everything that I was saying was untrue and to not trust my body and that I was powerless and all of these things. I was like, "Ah, no, I hear you. Maybe this works for some people, but please listen to me and meet me where I'm at." I wasn't really receiving that kind of support. Alyssa Scolari [09:56]: When you say people were telling you, do you mean professionals, healthcare professionals were telling you ... In what aspects were they telling you to not listen to your body? Amy Guerrero [10:07]: The first treatment center that I went to, I mean, beautiful humans that knew what they knew. They were a 12-step modeled treatment center. Everything was modeled off of the 12 steps. They really believed in everything that the book said and didn't take into account the body and the trauma and the deeper underlying things. It was like, "Oh, yeah, okay, sure, but right now you're powerless over alcohol and that's all we need to focus on." Amy Guerrero [10:38]: I'm like, "Maybe, but all day long I can tell you what you want to hear, but my body's still telling me, 'I'm not safe here. I'm not safe here. I'm not safe here.'" That extra ... You know? I think coping with food or by not really choosing food in the ways to nurture the body, right? Amy Guerrero [11:00]: That's something that's so similar where the people that are there just don't feel like they're being met where they're at and they're being told how they feel rather than actually being listened to on how they feel. I feel like that was something that was really missing. Amy Guerrero [11:15]: No fault of the practitioners. Just not trained in the same things that I had already been studying for a long time, because I was into my body's going to tell me what's right and what's wrong. Alyssa Scolari [11:29]: Yeah. Absolutely. As I think back to my eating disorder treatment days, because I had a whole host of anorexia, bulimia and then binge eating, and by the time I was in treatment, I was in full-blown binge eating. It's exactly like you said, they know what they know and they don't know what they don't know. What they didn't know was how badly I needed food to be able to survive with what I was going through. Alyssa Scolari [12:00]: What they didn't know was how deeply and horribly traumatized I had just been. I have a group of people sitting here telling me like, "You have to stop eating. You have to stop." Then I would get those weekly weigh-ins and they would be like, "You gained more weight this week. You're not being compliant." Ultimately they kicked me out. I got kicked out. Cue guilt and shame. Alyssa Scolari [12:29]: I mean, please. I mean, I understand. I feel completely what you're saying, because people are in a way telling you not to listen to your body. Amy Guerrero [12:43]: Yeah. I don't know about your experience and I really don't ... This is such an important conversation because I felt shame from childhood and I was really good at feeling shame. As a matter of fact, I felt more comfortable in my shame than I did in my power, so when people would tell me to not listen to my body or basically that what I was doing was wrong, again, it confirmed that I had to stay in the shame spiral. Amy Guerrero [13:14]: I had to ... I call it a blanket. I stayed underneath the blanket of shame and walked through my life with not good enoughness, with compromising my body with men, with work, with overworking, overdoing over everything, over, over, over, really led by my masculine energy. Amy Guerrero [13:32]: Because I was more comfortable feeling ashamed of who I actually was than empowered to be the confident woman that ... I exhibited all the traits of it on the outside, but inside I was like, oh, just awfully, awfully, awfully shameful of everything and always asking for permission to take up any freaking space in any room that I was in. Alyssa Scolari [13:59]: Absolutely. Absolutely. It's like, we have trauma that contributes to us feeling very disconnected from our bodies and then we try to seek help. Then we get this message from people who aren't meaning to give us this message, but again, they don't know what they don't know. Then we get this message that's like, "Well, yeah, you really don't. You really don't know what's going on." This is really bad. Alyssa Scolari [14:31]: Then we further detach from ourselves and we just sink into the shame. I mean, yeah, absolutely. I mean, to the point where I remember being a kid and if somebody ever told me ... I would get the comment a lot, because I think by nature, I'm a loud person. I do have a lot of confident energy, and if somebody would tell me like, "Shh." Just that, if you shush me, done. Done. Alyssa Scolari [15:04]: Shame attack, right? You call it a shame blanket. I call it shame attack. I'm done. Hiding under a rock, shame spiral into suicidality. Amy Guerrero [15:15]: Yeah. Oh, gosh. Yeah. I think again, it's something that we don't spend enough time naturalizing. It's just like, "Oh, it's totally a natural response based on the fact that we weren't being met where we were." No one was just looking in our eyes going, "Hey, that's okay. What you're feeling's totally natural." Instead, it was like, "Oh my God, it's my fault again." You know? Amy Guerrero [15:42]: I can remember even, especially with my partners, how I would just shut down, and because I have such a big presence in a room as well, when I shut down, I shut down the whole room because of my energetic [inaudible 00:15:53]. Like a manifesting generator, utilitarian. I am an energy source and a- Alyssa Scolari [15:58]: You're a manifesting generator? Amy Guerrero [16:00]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [16:01]: Okay. I'm a projector. Amy Guerrero [16:03]: Oh, beautiful. Alyssa Scolari [16:04]: To the listeners out there, look this shit up. I am telling you, your life will be changed by human design. Go to Jovianarchive.com. Find your human design. You will be forever changed. That's a side note. Amy Guerrero [16:16]: Yeah. Totally. My best friend is a projector as well, and so I've learned so much about projectors. Yeah. Yeah. Our energy levels are so different, and so it's so beautiful to have this information so that we can navigate our relationship in such a different way. Alyssa Scolari [16:32]: It's a truly beautiful thing. I think my husband is a manifesting generator and it is like reading about manifesting generators I'm like, "Wow." It's so cool. Anyway, I digress because I could talk about human design all day too. I want to ask you, what was that turning point for you? Alyssa Scolari [16:53]: Because you're describing the Amy who was walking around feeling detached, getting this message from treatment facilities that you shouldn't trust your body, right? Then you're trying to give up this addiction that you actually need to survive. How did you get from that Amy to the Amy who's like, "Oh, I needed this and it's okay that I needed this." Amy Guerrero [17:20]: Yeah. That's a great question. It took about 18 months. First it took me like just trying to take my life. I always tried to drink enough and take enough Xanax to just not be here. I was so frustrated because it just wouldn't work. Somehow some way, I would end up in the hospital and somehow I would wake up. I started writing this program, the Thrive in Recovery methodologies, I call it Regroovin', in 2014 when I was first in treatment. Amy Guerrero [17:48]: By 2016 I was unsuccessful again and I was just like, "Enough is enough." I went to a treatment center and I said, "Please, let me do it my way. Hold space for me. I have a plan. I just need a safe environment to get out of this. I will be the client that I need to be, if you give me space to study and do my own thing during groups." They did. I did exactly what I was told to do and got out of there. Amy Guerrero [18:19]: Then I chose to move into sober living. When I moved into sober living, I immediately started creating the coursework and teaching it three months later and then started my business. It's like, I knew that if I wasn't going to die, that I needed to live like I was never going to live before. Amy Guerrero [18:38]: Exactly like you said, I needed to go through this experience to be here now to bring this into the world. It wasn't really this super empowered decision. It was just like, "Oh, okay. I didn't die again so I'm going to live like I've never lived before." Alyssa Scolari [18:55]: That's realistic, right? I so appreciate that because that's what it's like. That's recovery. It's not like I think the way they make it fucking look in movies where you wake up one day and the sun shines fucking brighter and the birds are chirping. The birds are singing that you're meant to be alive. That's not the shit that happens. Alyssa Scolari [19:22]: It's like, we wake up and we're like, "Well ..." I know for me, it was like I had an attempt and then it didn't work and I was like ... It's very similar. I was like, "Well, fuck. I'm here. I guess I'm fucking here. What am I going to do about this shit?" Amy Guerrero [19:43]: Yeah. A hundred percent. It wasn't this beautiful oh. It was like, "I'm fucking here and I'm going to fucking make this decision and everyone just ..." Then I think there was a bit of like, "I'm going to prove the haters fucking wrong." Alyssa Scolari [20:01]: Yes. That anger that you make productive instead of self-destructive. Amy Guerrero [20:05]: Absolutely. Yeah. I was still really involved in the 12-step communities and the things that I knew that people told me they worked and I was like, "You know what, I'm going to study them. I'm going to go into why these things were developed and why it works. Then study SMART Recovery and then study LifeRing, and then study all of these different modalities and figure out something. What's the throughline for all of them? Why does this work?" Amy Guerrero [20:30]: I was. I was fucking angry at first, and so I wanted to prove everybody fucking wrong. Then I also wanted the answer to be through the body. What I first started with my gateway in was actually through nutrition and wellness and just understanding instead of eliminating things from people's diet, because we already eliminated so much, how can we add in things to support them? Amy Guerrero [20:53]: I started making essential oil blends and I started teaching yoga classes and just really encouraging everyone in ... Because I was working at treatment centers. Encouraging them to go to sound baths and to go into the somatics. It's like, let's just get to know that you have a body that's meant to do more than take you out in so many different ways. Amy Guerrero [21:14]: Because that detachment, that head that's not attached to the body, just felt like their body was in their way and then therefore abused it. All of the sex that happened in there, I was just like, "Ouch, that does not feel good for you." You know? Alyssa Scolari [21:30]: Yeah. Amy Guerrero [21:30]: For many of the women, they weren't even having orgasms, but they were sleeping with everyone at treatment. I was just like, "Let's stop that and let's add in some yummy oils and some yummy practices and let's go to the beach every day. Then let's acquaint yourself with your sensuality in a different way." Alyssa Scolari [21:48]: Yes. I love that. Operating from the approach of, what can we add, right? What can we add? Because you clearly are lacking, right? We're already lacking in something if we are caught up in addiction and eating disorders. It's like, let's not take anything away right now because that's not safe. Then in my private practice, I tend to be very slow with that. Alyssa Scolari [22:20]: I actually get a lot of ... In working with kids because I work with kids and adults, but the parents of kids are often on my ass about like, "Why is my kid still binge eating? Why? This isn't working." I'm very slow. I'm never like, "Well, why don't you just stop?" Because you don't know what's on the other side of that. Nine times out of 10, it's deep, intense suicidality. Amy Guerrero [22:49]: Yeah. Oh, gosh. I don't know how many times you were told that, "Oh, God, Amy you're so smart. Why don't you just stop?" Alyssa Scolari [23:00]: You have such a bright future. Just stop. Amy Guerrero [23:04]: Oh my God. I just remember when ... I mean, at one point I remember I did try to kick someone in the face when they told me that. I was just like, "It's so insulting." I was drunk but, "It's so insulting to hear that. I know I'm fucking smart. I know I've accomplished all of this shit. I know that it's not a wise decision. My prefrontal cortex is not online right now. Get the fuck out of my face. If you ever told me to just stop again." Really listen to what that means. Alyssa Scolari [23:36]: Right. Amy Guerrero [23:37]: It is so condescending. Alyssa Scolari [23:38]: You're only problem won't be my foot if you ever fucking tell me to stop again. We're going to have much bigger problems than my foot in your face. Amy Guerrero [23:49]: Yeah. I get it because the parents want to control that so badly. Then that's their unhealed emotional trauma. Alyssa Scolari [23:57]: Totally. Totally. A thousand percent. For you, this is the approach that you're taking and you work individually with people? Amy Guerrero [24:08]: And in groups. Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [24:10]: And in groups. Yeah. Tell me a little bit about the business that you have because you've taken, what I feel is like a newer approach and a highly effective approach to recovering from addiction and trauma because, right? The biggest thing is, "Okay. Now what, right? After I'm no longer an alcoholic or I no longer am using drugs, now what do I do?" Alyssa Scolari [24:33]: I feel like you have found a really beautiful way of helping people through that. How do you do that? If you can answer that and in a few sentences, I don't know if you can. Amy Guerrero [24:42]: I can actually. I mean, that's exactly what it was. It was like, you're sober now what? Right? Now maybe for the first time we're learning how to do life, right? The first thing that I do when I'm working with people one-on-one is we usually start with something like a three-month commitment to one another and really just decide like, yes, we're in it. Amy Guerrero [25:06]: That first month is all about teaching regulation and really helping them understand that they have a nervous system and the three parts of the nervous system and really teaching polyvagal. Then understanding their attachment patterns and then not going too deep into the trauma, but just touching on the things that we know, what I call them they're anchors of trauma, right? Amy Guerrero [25:28]: Like, "Oh, that's the incident that started this and that's the incident that started this." We build that connection to take away the shame and the guilt and the blame, right? Because I believe that once we understand that we have a nervous system and we really get to know it and map it out, then we're like, "Oh, yes, it all makes sense. It wasn't my fault." Amy Guerrero [25:51]: Then we can start actually doing a life and setting up a plan to repair, to reconnect and to build that trust from within so that people can start to trust from without as well. Just depending ... High-level mentorship. We are talking every day and there's just a lot, a lot that happens in that one-on-one work, that most of my clients now are starting their own businesses. Amy Guerrero [26:19]: It's so beautiful to watch this ripple out and then they have 10 or 15 clients that are learning this work. Then those 10 or 15 clients, a couple of them start and I'm like, "Yes, this is how we're going to change the world." Right? Is the more people that understand this. Alyssa Scolari [26:35]: Yes. Amy Guerrero [26:36]: It starts with that deep one-on-one, depending on where they are in their journey. Sometimes people are coming to me with 10 or 15 years of sobriety, but not that real deeper ... As you said earlier, that real fucking recovery, right? They're still just scratching the surface and they've been sober for 10 or 15 years and they're ready to do their deeper work. They've heard something in me that they're just like, "Oh, yeah, girl, please help me get there." Amy Guerrero [26:59]: That's really fun because things happen so quickly because we have a lot of sober time, but we don't have a lot of time that they went into their trauma. They're often very resistant and very blocked by their 12-steppedness. Y'all, I do not have anything against 12 step at all, but there's some deconditioning that has to happen from any place that we spend a lot of time. Alyssa Scolari [27:21]: Oh, yeah. Amy Guerrero [27:23]: There's nothing right or wrong with it. Alyssa Scolari [27:25]: Absolutely. Absolutely. Then if I understand this correctly, you don't work with people who are active in their addiction or you- Amy Guerrero [27:35]: Depending. Depending. Alyssa Scolari [27:36]: Depending. Amy Guerrero [27:36]: Yeah. I have several people right now that I'm working with that are still having a little bit of going back to that coping mechanism every now and again. Safety is everything for me. If someone's really in their stuff and I know that I'm not going to be able to keep them safe because I'm not with them physically, then I will suggest that they go someplace else just because safety is so important. Again, they're not going to get well if they don't feel safe with me. Alyssa Scolari [28:07]: Yeah. I think that that is so important. I'm really glad you brought that up because I was going to say, "I think that we should clarify that there's a certain level here where it's simply not safe." I don't want for the listeners for it to come off as like I'm being like, "Oh, yeah, just let people run hog-wild into the arms of addiction and we just watch people waste." No, right? That's not what we're doing here. Amy Guerrero [28:37]: Oh, no. No, no, no, no. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [28:38]: It's, there's certainly a level of assessment there where we're like, "Is it safe? Is it not safe?" I've had people who come to me with an eating disorder and I'm like, "This isn't safe. I'm not trying to tell you, you have to give up the thing that's kind of keeping you alive, but now the thing that's keeping you alive is nearly killing you." That's where it's like, I feel unsafe. Amy Guerrero [29:02]: Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, fortunately I'm usually able to tell that within the first conversation. Alyssa Scolari [29:08]: Absolutely. Amy Guerrero [29:08]: Then I'm able to make lots of recommendations in places that I really trust and that I've built relationships with, that I know that they have some of these modalities in place to keep them safe. Then we can work together after that initial ... Maybe just a little time out away from their coping mechanism and just understanding it at a higher level. Alyssa Scolari [29:31]: Totally. Yeah. Totally. Thrive in Recovery is your program, but you also recently have Bridge to Trust. Amy Guerrero [29:42]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [29:43]: Can you talk a little bit about that? Because I think that's really neat. Amy Guerrero [29:46]: Oh, yeah. Oh, it's so neat. Yeah. What I found was that people were working with me for three months and then six months sometimes and then they just didn't know how to connect to their friends and family. They had this understanding of their nervous system. They had this understanding of their attachment system and they were just like, "Ah, no one understands me and they just keep taking me back to my old patterns and my old behaviors." Amy Guerrero [30:10]: The Bridge to Trust experience is all about learning to trust what you know, to come back to that intuition, to come back to that trust, and then to invite your friends and family from that place to learn with you, right? Not about the addiction, not about the recovery, but like, "Hey, how can we connect more deeply as humans here and have yummy or healthier communication with each other and really bridge this trust so that we can recover the trust that maybe was broken when we were heavily into our patterns?" Amy Guerrero [30:44]: Because I know for me, I broke a lot of trust out there in the world and it took time for me to build that bridge within myself. Then I felt safe to offer it to others. Like, "Oh, you can come closer to me and here's how." I can show you without guilt and shame an amends process of me going, "Oh my God, I'm so sorry." It was more like, "Hey, I get it. What can I do to make this right? How can we move on from here?" Alyssa Scolari [31:09]: That is a beautiful thing. I think probably hugely helpful, because one of the things that I have seen lead to relapse is a lack of those protective factors, i.e. relationships. You're not just saying, "Okay. Great. You've worked through your trauma. We've been working together. Good luck. Have fun. Catch you on the other side." Alyssa Scolari [31:40]: What you're doing is taking it a step further and then going, "Hey, let's also now build some really healthy and trusting relationships in your life so that you can continue on this path." Oh, that's so cool. I love that. Amy Guerrero [31:54]: Yeah. Because isolation and the loneliness, it's like we can learn all of this shit, but if we're not practicing it with someone that we trust, then we're not- Alyssa Scolari [32:03]: We fall right back into ... Yeah. Amy Guerrero [32:06]: Very quickly. Alyssa Scolari [32:07]: Yeah. Amy Guerrero [32:08]: It's so cool because the Bridge to Trust events have led to a community and just watching this community just grow with each other and feel that like, "Oh my gosh." And practicing with each other, and then going and practicing with their friends and their family and then going, "Oh, wait, this works." Then inviting their friends and family to come join the community and then all of a sudden we've got parents and their children and partners and their partner. Amy Guerrero [32:36]: Their partners are like, "Oh, shit, I need this stuff. I always thought it was them. I always thought it was their fault." You know? And I'm pointing my finger. There's a lot of that. The finger-pointing starts to go like, "Oh, shit, we're in this together. We both have nervous systems. How can we really understand this at a deeper level?" Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [32:57]: Yes. Because it becomes so easy to blame the person with the addiction or the person with the 'mental health', right? It's them, they're sick. They're not well. I'm just like, "Man, I wish I could bring my whole family to one of these Bridge to Trust." Because I'm the outcast in my family, even doing what I do. It's like, "Oh, she's the weird one. We don't talk to her." It's like ... Right? Alyssa Scolari [33:28]: I'm sure in this event you have family members that then their eyes are open to, "Oh, right. Multiple nervous systems. We're all trying to regulate. I did play a part in this. I did have a role to play in this as well." I think that's really important. Amy Guerrero [33:49]: Yeah. Another virtual Bridge to Trust event is coming up at the end of July. It's so exciting because exactly what you said happens. I have many parents that come without their children at first and then they're like, "Oh, shit. Thank you." Because I don't make it about the coping mechanisms. It's all about the solution and the root cause of what keeps us stuck intergenerationally and that trauma. Then just some ... I like to bring fun. I call everything I do a regrooving method. We're regrooving- Alyssa Scolari [34:24]: I love it. Amy Guerrero [34:24]: ... our nervous systems to just ... And I bring a lot of fun and breath, sound and movement into things. It's like, "Oh, we're not just going to sit still and learn a bunch of shit." We're going to interact and have some fun together and not take this so seriously that they're like, "Oh, she's the weird one." We're all weird together, y'all. Alyssa Scolari [34:43]: We're all weird. We're all a little dysregulated. Amy Guerrero [34:46]: Absolutely. When you learn to come back to regulation and giggle about it, then we can really embrace that dysregulation and it becomes regulated. Alyssa Scolari [34:55]: Yes. It's a beautiful thing. Amy Guerrero [34:59]: Yeah. It's freedom. Alyssa Scolari [35:01]: It is. It truly is. Now, if people would like to find you, because you're speaking some really innovative treatment approaches, what you're doing is so important, so important, how can people find you? Amy Guerrero [35:16]: Yeah. I think the easiest thing is Instagram, Facebook and my website is Thrive in Recovery with Amy. There's no secret there. It's how do you thrive in recovery and with Amy? Right? It's all there. Instagram is a great place to get to know me. There's tons of videos. I go live three times a week. I'm there for Q&As. Alyssa Scolari [35:39]: So cool. Amy Guerrero [35:40]: Facebook is the samesies, I do a weekend wellness hack every Sunday night on Facebook and I have been for years. I'm really consistent in my practices and I invite you to come closer to check it out, and then we go from there. Alyssa Scolari [35:54]: So cool. For the listeners out there, I will ... Well, A, I'm going to be following you myself because I really think that's ... I love what you're doing. I really, really do. B, for the listeners out there, I will link everything in the show notes. You know the deal, you by now. Head over to the show notes and you will find everything that you need. All things Amy. Alyssa Scolari [36:20]: Amy, thank you so much for coming on today. This has been truly a delightful conversation. You're a delightful human being and you are really kicking ass in the world, so thank you. Amy Guerrero [36:35]: Thank you. It's so great to be here with you today and I will talk to you soon. Good luck on the rest of your move too. Alyssa Scolari [36:42]: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com, or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Alyssa Scolari [36:59]: Lastly, please head over to at patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Please head on over again. That's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you and we appreciate your support. Alyssa Scolari [37:27]: [singing]

Gut Check Project
Ep 61: Michael Ruark

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 83:54


Hello gut check project fans and KB MD health family. I hope that you're having a great day soon to be joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. It's time for episode number 61. And today's episode, I'm just going to ask everyone, no matter what part of the spectrum that you come from, come with an open mind on this episode. This is a fantastic episode very, very informative. Our guest today is Michael ruark. He is the lead strategist for only one of three licenced medical cannabis companies. Good blend medical cannabis. And yes, that is THC, which is utilised as a medicine for specially designated criterion. And they update it every single year. So September 1, which we just recorded this right before September 1, there's actually a whole new list of medical conditions, which are now legal to be treated by medical professionals. And believe it or not, they have a network of already over 500 positions throughout the state of Texas since 2018, which are licenced and actively dispense medical cannabis. And good blend is one of those companies. So Michael joins the show today to really answer some fantastic questions. And Michael's an amazing person in his own right. He's, he's got a an electrical engineering degree from Stanford as well as his master's he served in the US Air Force, he led a team at National Security Agency, the NSA. I mean, this man is no slouch, he came to this profession to this company. By no mistake whatsoever. He simply doesn't want to just do good. He wants to do great by the citizens of Texas and simply help people live a better life. There's a better way for some of the elements out there and he has a very, very strong passion for helping out our veterans and the Veterans Administration. So I don't want to give away everything in the episode because Miko does a much better job of articulating all of that stuff. So let's get to our sponsors, of course are trying to they've been a sponsor for every show and I imagine they always will be because they were created by my co host, Dr. kins brown are trying to get your daily poly phenol is love my tummy, calm, stop the bloating, stop the abdominal discomfort. If you're an athlete, you need paly finos every single day. And I don't know maybe some of us are worried about a virus and I don't know maybe you're interested in things that function is natural zinc on fours. Well, polyphenols are natural zinc ion fours. So anyhow, without saying too much draw your own conclusions at what this awesome natural product can do for you, but go to love my tummy.com load up on your daily polyphenols today. Love My tiny.com artron deal. And of course, KB m d health.com. You want to learn a little bit more about Dr. Brown learn a bit more about his philosophy. And of course connect with his own branded KVM D health CBD go to KB Md health.com. Use code GCP save 20% off of anything in the store that includes Brock elite that includes the signature packages of CBD artron teal, and rock elite, you can combine the whole thing in there KB Md health.com. Sign up for our newsletters. It's KB MD health is actually growing quite a bit. And we've got some new things in store this fall. So keep in contact with us. And of course do you like great food? Do you like food that tastes awesome? Do you have to sometimes worry about though what kind of diet it fits into? Maybe you're paleo maybe you're gluten free. Of course. I'm going to mention unrefined bakery. They've been a longtime sponsor, unrefined bakery.com go to unrefined bakery. And if you think that just because you suffer from celiac disease, that you can't have an awesome cupcake. Or you can't have some awesome tasting bread or some trail mix that you can trust pie crust, check out unrefined bakery, they My wife has celiac disease This is her go to. And it's just incredible food you'd have no idea that they were all specialty foods to fit specialty diets, unrefined bakery go to unrefined bakery.com you can get 20% off of your entire first order. By using code gut check again your entire first order. So low up on bread load up on pie crust load up on cupcakes, are you selling cupcakes are just incredible. No levy cake, I mean like cake and they got great cakes or cupcakes there and I love the unrefined bakery.com check it out. Use code gut check 20% off your entire first order. Okay. Love those sponsors. they've kept the show going But what really keeps the show going just as much is awesome guests like Michael ruark coming up next episode number 61though KB MD health and gut check project fans, I hope you have a great day. It is now time for episode number 61. I am joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. And we got a special guest today, Mr. Marcus ruark. Ken, why don't you go ahead and fill us in.5:38  So it's gonna be super exciting show. Today we have Marcus ruark. And this is something that is very, very important. It's important for my patients. It's important for anybody that deals with all kinds of diseases, but I'm thrilled to have him here. thrilled to be here. Marcus, thank you so much for coming in Marcus ruark is president of good blend, Texas, which is headquartered in Austin, Texas, and proudly sells cannabis products that are cultivated and produced right here in the Lone Star State as one of only three state licenced medical dispensaries. Now, Marcus, I saw your bio, this is super cool, you have a very interesting background. And prior to joining good blend, you received your electrical engineering degree from Stanford. Then you received your master's degree at Stanford and I keep saying Stanford because Eric and I both have kids which are applying for college. And when I see Stanford, that's the sort of crown jewel that most parents want their kids to go to. And they like tennis players. And they like you received your master's degree at Stanford in management, science and engineering. Following this, you went on to serve as a captain in the US Air Force, where you lead your team in the National Security Agency, followed by advanced Systems Division of us Space Command. That's crazy. Following that, your bio discusses a lot of other really fascinating things that I want to get into. But before we get into that, I want to talk a little bit about what's not in your bio. Okay, tell me about you. Family. What's going on with Marcus?7:21  Sure. Well, we just had a big week in the ruag family took my daughter to college, which you just alluded to a little bit ago there. She's going to San Diego State nice, pretty excited about that. But also, you know, it's a little bit anxious and first first kid out of the nest, so to speak. So that's exciting. And then my son started up eighth grade first time back in school since spring of his sixth grade year, right when everybody went home for COVID. So very exciting there too, and he's trying out for football. So fingers crossed,7:49  right on, right on.7:51  That's a plate right there. And so San Diego State that's Trojans, she's a Trojan Aztecs, Aztecs. Yeah. I'm learning too. Nice. All right, that's a Southern California Nevermind. Sorry.8:02  So the family, your background, there was this huge section in your bio, we're very clearly you have an entrepreneurial spirit, you have leadership skills, you are willing to push the boundaries a bit and try some different positions technologies. Can you give me what led you up to this?8:24  Absolutely. So after I got out of the Air Force, I was very interested in joining the the high tech scene that was happening in San Francisco. So did that ride around? Actually not the best time for that because it was right around the bubble here is where there was a big crash back in 2000. But that being said, really got interested in bringing new products to new markets, and bringing new benefits to customers who maybe hadn't seen those benefits before in the past. So very exciting, did a lot of startups founded a lot of companies. And then at some point I crossed over into healthcare so a startup in the healthcare space and it hit me then that as rewarding as I thought it had been doing startups in high tech to do in healthcare it was even more special because not only are you starting a company but you're actually helping people right we were helping doctors treat patients better we were helping patients have better outcomes in their in their hospitals stays. So it was really rewarding. And at some point after that, I was able to join a company called Fluence which you probably saw on the on the resume, but they were in the LED lighting space. And I started there to help out with the customer experience for their customer base. And I learned that the customer base was primarily in three segments, customers who are coming to a growing produce companies who are growing flowers, and then cannabis companies and can imagine which one of the segments was probably the fastest growing it was their cannabis customers and so that was entirely new to me the cannabis world and I as you guys have I dove deeply into it the endocannabinoid system the the benefits of cannabis and learned about cultivation and Creation of products and distribution, all that kind of good stuff. And right around, I guess was the spring of 2017, Texas announced the grant of the first couple of licences for the Texas compassionate use programme. And when, you know, I reached out to one of the companies and say, I think I can help you guys here in Texas. And so I came on board as president of goodwill in Texas at that time.10:21  And that's fascinating. So I mean, obviously, it was just natural as a natural progression. You ended up seeing that there was a need, it was certainly new to you. Sounds like maybe correct me if I'm wrong, but you're inspired by things that you don't know enough about, but seem intriguing could help people I'm still learning10:35  and so much to learn in this space still, but but it ends up it's a great match for all that because it's it's technology, right? It's, it's horticulture, and it's it's helping people within today, right was what was what we're here to do is help Texans.10:48  So it's an electrical engineer, I get that you were drawn to the LED space, but then getting drawn to healthcare and now more of a I mean, what would you describe your position at good blood?10:59  I, I'm leading the entire Texas team here. Everything from cultivation, to product development, formulation, packaging, distribution, working with physicians, working with patient support groups, so pretty much everything setting strategy product roadmap and trying to build a great culture for the team here.11:18  So one of the things that we talk about in our company is the why the why the underlying reason why all this is happening, because if you don't have a solid, why then what you're describing, nobody else really will believe in that. But it sounds like you found your y even if you haven't defined your y statement, you found the Y11:37  Well, I can define it for you. It's we are empowering Texans to find their well being right through natural medicines that our patients say work. And it's, it's, it's so rewarding. Now, we have a we have a group of we have a role the company called mobile wellness coordinators, and these are the folks it's probably one of the hardest jobs at the company, you have to be knowledgeable about cannabis, the endocannabinoid system, talking to patients, so you have to be bit of an extrovert, right? It'll talk to patients. But you also have to drive across the large distances of Texas to deliver medicine to patients doors. So you also have to be a bit of an introvert there to be happy listening to podcasts while you're driving. They have the best job in the company, though, because when they're making that second delivery to a patient, they get to hear how that patient did they could hear the patient testimonials, and they're incredibly rewarding. And it's I feel really almost envious that they get to do this. But they're they're so nice to come back and share their stories with us after they've had these amazing conversations.12:38  So where are you with the company before they ended up having their first dispense of their certified? Yeah,12:45  I've been with the company since 2017. We served our first patients in early 2019. Okay, and what12:52  was it like? What was the anticipation like to get your first patient that had been referred in and and bringing those physicians on board to do that here in a state that didn't do it before?13:01  Well, I think predict my answer was huge and hugely rewarding. Like I said, it's this, the testimonies we hear are fantastic. And as we've come to market with even a wider set of products, different ratios of CBD to THC, different terpene profiles, were able to help more people were able to give prescribing doctors more choices, and patients more choices on how they how they help themselves.13:28  But it just seems like it would be a really cool opportunity to paint a picture of how you feel like you're going to be able to deliver something that maybe a physician doesn't feel like they've got a total grasp, because that's why you would offer an alternative. And then now you've recruited them to go now then just a new novel way, but prior to your launch wasn't really necessarily well embraced. How hard is it to get that message and get physicians to want to buy in to do that?13:54  It is still a challenge today. Sure. And one of the reasons I'm so excited that you invited me here today is because one of my number one missions right now is to try to get the word out to increase awareness. I suspect. We don't have a random text in here right now. But if we grabbed one walked outside in the heat, and ask them if cannabis was legal in the state of Texas, most likely they're gonna say no. And even for the patient groups where it is legal right now, most of them don't know that it's legal. So our number one job right now is creating awareness growing the number of Texans who are aware that they have this treatment available to them. And I really appreciate being on a show like this to help get the word out.14:32  What I think is so cool is that somebody with your pedigree has chosen to do this and now finding out why you chose to do it, which is you got into healthcare, you had the opportunity to do these, these other companies where it could have just been about financial reward. But once you got in and saw the impact that you can have that then you chose to do this with that message of we're going to empower people to take, take their health over what was your statement again,14:57  you're going to empower empower them to take charge with Their own wellbeing,15:01  empower them to take charge of their own well being. That's something that I try to do as a physician all the time. And so many times, it's limited because of the insurance plan because of lack of funding because of lack of efficacy. Sure. So I'm thrilled that Texas decided to do this because we've been waiting to see this happen. I've talked to my colleagues and other states, where medical cannabis is legal. And they tell me about the success that they're having with their patients. As a gastroenterologist, when I looked at, let me just pick a patient population, like my inflammatory bowel disease patients, I'm open to discuss things I I'm more of a functional type person. So I will ask these questions. And if somebody has Crohn's disease, and they're between the ages of 18 to 40, I just say, Are you using cannabis for your health? And they'll stop and be like, yeah, how did you guess? Yeah, I mean, they just go, yeah. And because they're on forums, they're talking. And I said, well, it's pretty exciting, because I think we're headed that way with Texas. And I think that we can make this so that you don't, so that you can have control over this so that you can actually empower your own health with this with products that are meticulously cultivated that have Certificate of analysis that you don't question, which is what good blend is doing. Right. Right.16:23  Well, the other the other message I'd like to get across and it ties into what you just said, is that it's actually easy to do, it's easy to get into the programme. So right, not only do they do Texans not know what exists, but if they do, they probably think it's incredibly difficult to get a prescription and to get product and to be able to afford it. And that's another message I would like to leave with folks is that it, take a look into it, right? Go to good blend.com because it's actually easy to get signed up and get to be part of the programme.16:48  Oh, we're gonna get into all of that. I have a feeling I want to like, where do I go? I love I love talking to people that have been there done that, that have degrees, like you have that have seen so many things. I want to know, you know, what Goodwin does where it is. But I think one of the most important things that people have to realise is that you've got very, I've been to a programme and I've met the doctors that showed up to the programme. And I've talked to paediatrician, psychiatrists and pain doctors here in Texas here in Plano, not just I'm not going very far out. And they told me the effects they're having on their patients. And these are smart people, somebody like you, also extremely smart, we start validating this whole industry and start shedding that kind of negative feeling that people have carried over over the years, obviously, other states are a little more advanced. But even my patients today, we had a 65 year old woman that is quite miserable from an autoimmune disease. And she just said flat out, would you care if I started smoking weed, and I'm like, not only do I not care, but I'm going to send you to a doctor because one of your diseases qualifies you, at least right now on this fairly limited set. And we'll talk about the different programmes, which are easy to get into and all these other things. And she just completely was like, You're kidding. I'm like now and these are, then you start briefly talking about ratios. And it's not about you know, smoking yourself, so you can't move on the couch. I just18:22  want to add to that, because where she is and where she finds herself. And this is why I think what company like good blend really bridges a gap that needs to be bridged. And that is, the reason why she asked or was hesitant to bring up the use of marijuana is because probably up until a certain point she felt shameful and trying to find a solution. And finally, she worked up enough nerve to finally throw it to Ken and say, do you mind if I do? So how long had she been sitting on the fence before she finally worked up the nerve, because we've seen it before. She's not a stranger to the clinic, to work up enough energy to be able to do that. And what I think is great about a company like good blend is stop waiting, we want you to feel better. And there's actually an easy pathway to do. So it's kind of how you see the the access there. Absolutely.19:10  It's it's one of the reasons that we try to have a vast selection of products that feel a little bit less intimidating. Right? So we'll probably get into that later too. But everything we can do to help folks out I mean, I'm actually kind of feeling bad for this person. Right? Because like you said, How long have you been sitting on that and not sharing that and she could have been helped a lot earlier. So yeah, and Texas is making really good strides there. Every two years. I have a legislative session and every two years we've been expanding the programme so I'm I'm very optimistic.19:43  It's if you are knowledgeable about this, so Eric and I got heavy into the CBD. Yes. area when CBD was still people were being arrested in Iran a foreigner here Yeah, Marin County. Over in Fort Worth. They were getting arrested. And I'm like I call Eric I'm like there's another person like what are we doing here? endocannabinoid system. This is perfect. And when you start talking about I'm like this person has an Endocannabinoid deficiency. They've got these chronic diseases, we are just putting band aids on all of these things, including pain meds. If we can get their endocannabinoid system back to balance, it is something that they need. If I have an asthmatic that shows up and they're wheezing, and I say you the only thing that that that is allowable under your plan, the only thing that's allowable in this, I'll take it back one second. Simone Biles, oh, yeah. Alright, so Simone Biles, this is and this was shared, I didn't I haven't talked to her. But it was viewed on a couple different articles that seemed pretty credible. It makes sense. Regardless, it different countries have different rules. Japan does not allow ADHD medication to be taken. She's been on ADHD medication for most of her life. So she goes to the Japan Olympics. And nobody's discussing that she couldn't take that it's a banned substance in the country. It's an accepted substance in the Olympic Committee, because it's an exemption, because they understand that. So she goes there. And everybody's like, what she's lost her train of thought and everything. So imagine if you can't get the drug that you need or the product that you need, and it's available right there. But somebody is putting a wall that's right there, if you're an asthmatic, and you're wheezing, and I can't give you ventolin inhaler to open up your Bronco airways because guess what? ventolin and bronchodilators. It has to be an exception. If it's if you're on the Olympics, like you have to get it exempt. Otherwise, it's considered a enhancing thing. There's things like that that are on that. You know that that's why you get NSF certified for different things, right things. So this is one of those deals where I'm like, if you're a diabetic and you need insulin, or if you need Metformin, and you can't get that, when I look at some of my patients, I'm like, Oh, my gosh, a beautiful balance of your endocannabinoid system may correct 90% of what you have going on, and we can take these eight drugs away. That's what I'm excited about.22:14  Yeah, so I have, I have a theory on this, which is that well, and partly this may end up being preaching to the choir, but it's my understanding that the endocannabinoid system is not well taught in med school, if at all. And if that's true, that means you have to learn it after you graduate. But it also means you may have some scepticism about it, it was only discovered in the 1990s. Yeah, I mean, how can we couldn't do better and discover before them, but that Okay, so it's discovered in the 90s. It's really important, right? And I've heard you guys talk about it a lot. But it is the I call it the it's like the conductor of the symphony. So it is conducting all the other systems in our bodies. And it's telling you that when to get a little louder, or that when to slow down. It keeps everything in balance. And a word you guys use frequently is homeostasis, right? It helps maintain that. And yet I was in a doctor's office the other day with my daughter had to get a COVID test before being allowed to go to San Diego State. And on the wall, this doctor's office you guys probably have to is the systems of the body. Right? It's got the skeletal system nervous system. And I look pretty hard on that poster, it could not find the endocannabinoid system. So to me, that kind of said, everything23:23  is that surprising. And it's unfortunate because it The end result is what we have now. It just simply becomes ignored. And then it becomes taboo. Because if it's being ignored, then maybe it's not acceptable to talk about and it's not acceptable to talk about then you have patients who are fearful for bringing forth an idea for a solution and then we're just slowing recovery when in fact, I mean, I'm not an advocate saying that THC is going to solve everything for anybody. But that doesn't mean it won't work for someone.23:51  We've talked about this before that I believe I'm a gastroenterologist I focus on the gastro anthological system. There are neurologists there are endocrinologist cardiologists, we will have an Endocannabinoid ologists because that is something that people have to get on board to get on board with. There's when you like First of all, a quick side note I suggest everybody after this is over go to good blends website that website is great. It is filled has so much information. So much great information about the history about why it became sort of tucked under the rug about how it was manipulated on a political level and then ultimately about how all these other cannabinoids are involved. So it's I don't know if you can't see it, it's way over there. But I purposely put I put a terpene in there we got lemonade being diffused right now so we can stay mentally clear. You know, terpenes being involved in all this. So as an induction as an Endocannabinoid ologists we're going to get to the point where we'll be like okay, well tell me what your Oh perfect. Sounds like You need some assistance with this. This is probably the blend that you need. This is more of you need a more CBD front heavy with immersing terpene to calm down and one thing in the morning. Yes, absolutely. And the fact that it's all natural and and does that.25:19  You want to repeat that. Just fixed my. We knew it didn't pop right back. I25:25  know what? No, I just said that. I think an Endocannabinoid ologists will eventually be able to fine tune what people take based on the terpenes. And Jen, and you mentioned,25:38  you mentioned maybe one thing in the morning, right to get you ready for your day and another thing in the evening to help you get ready for bed.25:44  Absolutely. And if we could get to that point where people are doing this, then they're like, okay, or as needed. The delivery systems. It's like, Okay, I'm a little overwhelmed right now I'm feeling really anxious. I just did a little something to cut this off. And non addicting all these other things. And Eric can attest to this. When we see these patients and we cringe every single time how many people show up young people. You look at their med list and you're like holy cow that Xanax, that's three different antidepressants. You got a muscle relaxer. How maybe Ambien will frequency so much Ambien, so much other sleep medicines. But let's look at the addictive potential of some of these medications, ultra opioids and benzodiazepines almost criminal, what has happened with these addictive medications that we know they're addictive, but without anything else to give them and you have a patient that's there. And as physicians and healthcare I ultimately want to help people and I have given opioids and I have had the discussion with them. Like I understand you're in a tremendous amount of pain, I need you to sleep. I'm willing to give this to you for a very short period, because I feel like if I can get you to sleep, your pain will be markedly better. And we can stop these other things. As somebody who the world's now not that recent, but five months or so ago, I had my first real neck injury where the pain was an I've redefined my pain scale kind of thing. People go, Oh, that's an eight out of 10 I really thought stubbing my toe. redefine it. And we've talked about him before but Wade McKenna, an orthopedist, you know, he told me he's like, Listen, I'm gonna, I don't I don't like, you know, hitting you with a bunch of opioids and stuff like this, what we really need is to call the muscles down, I'm going to give you a long acting, benzo for days, take it for four days, stop taking it after that, because your muscles will calm down at that point, there was a plan, there's a plan to get me on as a plan to get me off. And he purposely said, I don't mess with these opioids. Are you kidding me? As an orthopaedic surgeon, and when if we could sit there and say, okay, you a patient comes to me, I'm a, I'm a primary care doctor, and somebody has a significant injury. And so tell me what the biggest thing about this. It's the anxiety of knowing that I don't know what's going to happen, okay, then you give a blend, which is more effective on the anxiety, tell me what's happening here, the pain keeps me up. Okay, let's do this, we now have the opportunity to treat these symptoms that ultimately may or may not need some other intervention. But we know it's not addictive. We know that it actually has. And now we're going to get into the science of it. But we know that it actually has these different properties that help decrease the inflammatory processes by blocking p parganas. by blocking these different pathways, g couple proteins, we can get all sciency about it. But the reality is, I don't do that with my patients, I say, Tell me what it is that's bothering you the most. Let's see if we can give you something for that. That's the beauty of what you're doing right now. Good blend has the ability to take these natural molecules in different ratios to help in different scenarios. Totally agree.29:15  I mean, that's actually hit you reminding me it's kind of dissonant disheartening to look at a patient's med list when they come in. And there's a bunch of things kind of like what can just describe, and we're almost used to the polypharmacy or the or the multiple meds that are all listed there. And truly, knowing that a natural alternative could probably reduce that load. So we're playing less of this chemical warfare with this patient because it's almost a new we're kind of hinting at it earlier. It's almost like you're taking one thing to balance out the other thing that I've just gave them this new thing, and you're almost always chasing rather than actually treating and then and letting them be themselves.29:59  So we are getting that feedback from patients which is that once they've been on our medicine for a while they're their drug list is decreasing. Tell us I've we've had we have been able to stop these three things and now I'm down to these things I've been able to reduce the dose of these things. And if you I'm not, I'm not asking you to do this, but if you want to go Oprah on me and ask for patient testimonials I I made, you know, their tear jerker is really, in terms of helping things we're able to do with people.30:25  Well, you know what, yeah. Do you want to do it? Brian? Yeah, yeah. Tell me about one word, somebody, it made such a profound difference in their life that they couldn't hold back.30:34  Yeah. So there's a there's a patient we have that has terminal cancer. And that was a hard just that you guys have these conversation. I don't, it was a hard conversation for me to have. But he had a great outlook on his life. And he started taking our medicine, and he was able to cut back on his opioid use. And the way he described it to me was, it's not just good for me, it's really good for my family. Because on opioids, I'm a zombie. And with your medicine, since I've been able to decrease the opioids, I can be myself around my family my final days. So they're hard stories, but happy stories. Another mom said to us, her son had so many seizures a day that, and he had so many anti seizure medicine. He was kind of just there, right? But on our medicine, he was able to stop taking some of his anticonvulsant medicines. And he said, how this is when it gets me he says to us, one day, Mom, I have feelings.31:34  Wow.31:36  That's, I mean, what a What a crazy thing to have to lose as a kid the ability to basically participate in life because it's being taken away from you by a chemical that up until now was necessary, because you you obviously can't just sit there and suffer from seizure activity over and over again, that's, that's dangerous in and of itself. Right. But not knowing that there's a better alternative is honestly criminal. It's criminal, not to know that there's a better solution than just taking anticonvulsants to control I'm assuming epilepsy or something similar to32:09  right. So that's, so that brings up a really good point that mom, I have feelings. These medications have side effects, and the side effects that most people don't talk about as the pharmaceutical medicines, the pharmaceutical medications. Correct. So I get so many of these patients that are on polypharmacy, because so many of them have anti parasympathetic, meaning they affect the gut. Almost all of them do one way or the other. Oh, I have diarrhoea. When did that start? Six months ago, I see you're on Zoloft. When you start Zoloft. Seven months ago, huh? I have so much conversation What's going on? Oh, you're on the opioids? Oh, I've got a date all there. I'm fully aware that there's completely these are necessary drugs. But my job when I during residency. Some of us were chosen for basically treating older people. So I went to the older people clinic. And so my the technical term for it, that's the tactic. The older people,33:21  obviously, yes.33:23  Yeah. The layman's term is gerontology. But yeah, but we call it the older people. OPC. I would sit there. And as a resident, I'd looked at these lists, I'm like, you're 90, you're still here. Why do we care about your cholesterol that has this effect on this? And this? Why are you on this? Right? My sole job I viewed in that clinic, was to just get people off medicines, because the side effects at some point are just completely Yeah, outweighing that. And that was just a lifetime of going to this doctor that doctors cardiologists going to give this guest route, they just keep adding up. They just keep adding up him. Somebody shows up with a list of this. None of these drugs have ever been conducted in a trial, where they're all together. What happens then? We don't know. Well, I'm dealing with that now. And I've got a nine year old person and just every time they'd come back, they'd be more alert more. If you made it to 90. You're a baller. You've done it right. You deserve to drink, what's your mama smoke,34:28  what you eat what you want, do whatever it is. And they would love that by the time they were there. Yeah, they start having fun again, and it was just about getting them off their drugs. You got to hit on something, though. And maybe you seen this because you said you've seen a show or or two but something that we've had we have hit on is lifespan, and life expectancy is just a number. But what's way more important truly, to enjoy those numbers is to have a good health span. And to be able to function and participate in life if you're going to live it. You may have It'll be involved in it right? How do you How does? How does your company view healthspan? In relation to to that?35:09  I would say it's similar to the the things we've been talking about, which is if you can, if, if there's, if there's an opportunity to live a higher quality life, right. And there's a natural way to do that, and to get off some of the pharmaceuticals that maybe are causing some of the side effects, and you can live a happier higher quality life. I mean, that's, that's what we're here for. Right? It's kind of what I talked about well being that's exactly what we're here for.35:36  So if you gave two quick testimonies, one, obviously about someone with epilepsy and one from somebody who was suffering from terminal cancer, yes, what other what other ailments to kind of focus on as it stands right now?35:51  The so there is a treatable conditions list on Texas. And it is, it was created by statute. As you know, it started out in 2015, as intractable epilepsy, that was the only treatable condition. In 2019, the programme was expanded in a significant significant way where a lot of new conditions were added. So terminal cancer, autism, ALS, Parkinson's, spasticity, a whole giant category of conditions under the headline, incurable neurodegenerative diseases. And that has a list of about 300 things underneath it. So it was pretty significant expansion. And I would say across all those, all those treatable conditions, we're hearing positive testimonials.36:36  That's fascinating. And actually, I had glanced at it, I don't think that they cannot have spent any time on it. But I did notice that there was autism. And I don't know that you do you have a testimony or not. But it's definitely something that's near and dear to this guy in our research, just to polyphenols but he's made he's made no mistake about it. There's a play there with with cannabinoids as well.36:59  Yeah, I'll give you my I'll give you my take. In fact, we work with a great asset. She's been on the show before Angie cook. And she wrote up an incredible which I've yet to publish, partly because at the time, people were being I mean, Texans don't even I, I can go around right now and talk to my patients about CBD. And I've got CBD all over my office. And they will be like, Oh, boy, no, I'm not into that. And I'm like, let me explain that to you real quick. And let me explain this. Do you have any chronic condition, whatever, like, Well, yeah, totally do well, and then they end up, you know, purchasing it and saying, yeah, it made a huge difference. And it comes down to that rebuy rate. So as a business person, we know that I've got a almost 50% rebuy rate on Tron teal. And this is like, you know, worldwide. We know that that works. Because as if anybody's ever been in the pharmaceutical industry, I prescribe a drug and they come in and I'm like, Did that work and their trials that you know, the studies show? It's 8% better than placebo, whatever. So it all comes down to does the person want to come back and purchase more? That's To me, that's the that's where the rubber hits the road. My move towards autism became very personal. When I had a patient that brought her son in and he had become I'm an adult doctor, he had moved on from paediatrics to adult. And she said he's becoming almost impossible to take care of when he eats. He cannot communicate. He flailed he gets almost violent. And he's, you know, he's 16. Is he just becoming a young man, and this is getting really bad. I said, Listen, I don't know a whole lot about autism. But I do know that. You said when he eats, let's treat his gut. Let's fix his gut. And I'm just now getting into something where I believe it will play a role. And I put them on CBD. And now looking back, we're going to look at this, I'm going to be sitting in a lecture someday and an endocrinologist will have the exact thing to give that person. But right now that was best I could do is your mother shows up three months later, crying. And her son is communicating, not high level, but she's like, he's like, Hi. And he's talking. And I'm like, How do you feel? And he's like, you know, good. And she's like, This is crazy. It's been 10 years and I have not seen this person. And like, I don't know if it was the fix in the gut. I don't know if it was the CBD regardless, I think it's both. And that's where it came in. So then Angie did this incredible write up and maybe we can team up with your people to get it published, but it's like 50 pages long. It's super sciency. It's all about autism and the effect on the endocannabinoid system. And when I go to my colleagues and they say there's no science on this, we share a Mandalay capability, what Mandalay is. So we share this, the repository of journals that are out there are published and we've got a whole folder on There's a whole folder on CBD a whole folder on cannabis and cannabis. And the sciences, they're animals to humans. The problem is the science in the United States is not here the science that is recognised by our journals here, because, and we talked about this, that people don't realise that it was approved if you're going to study cannabis, and Michael Pollan was talking about this, the author Michael Pollan was talking about this, that the cannabis, which is approved by the FDA to be used in studies. It comes from one place, one place some crap lace, it's like 60 years old. Yeah, it's been around, and kind of just40:40  shit marijuana. It just it's not indicative. It's not similar to the kinds of Medicinal Products that you're gonna get.40:47  Yeah, exactly. This40:48  is what it is, and correct me if I'm wrong, but this is, this is what all sanctioned and allowed us research is done on is basically just this one lot. Correct.41:00  or from a federal perspective, I believe that's right. Yeah. Having said that, very exciting news in this most recent legislative session. Nice. The statute that they added to the statute that Texas can start its own research programme. So the department State Health Service real for real so yeah, they're they're writing the rules right now. And yes, it's very exciting. So Texas cannabis research. Does part of the Texas compassionate use Berg did not know that did not know that. And it goes beyond the treatable conditions list. For sure. do research, the research, whoever the research institution is picks what they want to study,41:40  I need people to hear that said a little bit close with money. Which part the?41:46  The research so the Texas compassionate use programme is introducing a research element. And the department State Health Services is writing the rules right now. I think they're even posted for public comment. And it's gonna happen. And so the research, whoever the research institution is, and they provide a list of who can qualify, you pick the condition you want to do research on. You do have to find an IRB. But it's sky's the limit. Oh,42:12  my gosh, that makes me so excited that just that turned into hope for my IBD patient. Yeah.42:20  So just to click and you42:21  get to use our products. You don't have to use the federal cannabis.42:25  Okay, I have been that is exciting having you on just for that one thing. I hope my partners listen to this because ga right now is we're getting close to 1000 providers strong. And in the state of Texas, basically everybody in the state now as part of this one group, to be able to power a study like that could be fan tastic. I have just, I thought that it was completely prohibitive. And Gotta love Texas. Gotta love. We're gonna do it in Texas if the feds don't want us. That's awesome.42:59  No comment on that. Your point about autism, I've had the I've been very fortunate to be able to attend a to medical cannabis conferences in Israel. And then one was in LA. And there's plenty of studies out there about autism and THC for43:14  sure. And that's what this 50 page review that Angie put together, put a lot of sweat and tears into it. And it's something that we should probably team up with some of your scientists to update it because it's about two years old. Yeah. But I was shocked reading it, the level of science, the level of information out there, and the amount of benefit that you can actually do and the correlation. So for me as gastroenterologist the correlation that when the endocannabinoid system is off, it affects all systems. But in my opinion, all health begins and ends in the gut. If you don't have a healthy gut, you ultimately affect the brain. And we've got we've done podcasts on this where we can show that neuro inflammation or chronic inflammation affects f h, which is the enzyme that breaks down your own endocannabinoids. And when you lower your inanda mind, which is the one that you know is your low level keeping you there. It's your body's own equivalent to THC. It's your body's own equivalent. And then on the flip side, when you have to a G which is the spotlight if that's getting turned on all the time, that's your that's like a that's the other portion of the endocannabinoid system. The difference between a Stanford grad and a simple country but doctrine Nebraska is I've used the same example the endocannabinoid system, but you referred to it as a symphony conductor. I refer to it as a traffic cop. Yeah. They're both good. I could say mines. You know what? I won't say. Yours is more elegant to start using that from now on. Yeah,44:52  elegant was exactly the word I was gonna say. So I'm glad you said it is refined and yours is quickie, Martin.45:00  To your point about the importance of the gut. And if you haven't checked out this research, please do. I think you're gonna find it very interesting. There's one of the leading researchers in the field of cannabis is a Dr. Ethan Russo. And he has a I think he calls it. I may begin this wrong, but the grand unified theory, but of course it spells out gut, but it's all about the the brain gut connection and with the endocannabinoid system as a key part of it, and you've you've addressed this in previous conversations, but they're all tied together.45:33  One of my problems that I have had, and I'm curious how you and your sales people have dealt with this, it's the person that I know how to say this. I'm enthusiastic. And it took me a long time I've read vitamin weed, which is a great book, forgot the Michelle Ross, Michelle Ross. That's it. Michelle Ross wrote that she's a PhD. You know, there's Goldstein's book. These books are great. But I had to read them a couple times. The first time I started getting into it before you start going because it's it's a different language. It's that's why I think we're gonna have an Endocannabinoid ologists. My problem is when I have somebody, it's that the vomit of knowledge that I have to keep myself from doing when somebody is like, what's that? And then you start getting into it, and you're like, what's the endocannabinoid system? So I've always I'm a little bit curious, from a business perspective, how you as a company, get into that naive, let's just start with the naive doctor46:38  that says, Why don't know about this? They start with the, you know, yeah, you know, I'm kind of curious. He may not want to divulge everything, but I really kind of want to know how many practitioners throughout the state are actively participating in this programme.46:50  So the state publishes some data about the programme. The most recent date is from July, and there were over approximately 50046:59  Oh, wow, it's much47:00  bigger than I thought. And to be a prescribing doctor, you have to be a board certified specialist, as you are. So it's, it's not every doctor, you have to write you have to be board board certified. And then the patient, the patient count as of July was right around 7070 507,500. That may not sound like much, but it's growing 10% every single month. Well, it'll be one of those things every single and this is in the in the official kickoff was 2019. Right. For the first patients. The first patients were actually served in 2018. Okay, not by us, but okay.47:38  So that is so tip of the iceberg because as a clinician, I went on once I found out you know, one of your sales people that had has known me for a long time as a friend and they got involved with this knowing that I'm involved with CBD and understand the endocannabinoid system. So first thing I did is I tried to sign up well, my specialty is not listed. So as a gastroenterologist, I'm not listed as currently interesting currently, because when I did the whole thing and went through it and tried to I couldn't find that. And then for me, it was a little daunting to say, Well, I'm internal medicine is there on board certified internal medicine, but I really practice 100%, gastroenterology. And I did not want to false under any false pretences as this is, because it's just a matter of time. It's better a short time. So discussing that, from a business perspective, what can I do? As a physician who's very interested in this? help some of the legislation, bring in other let's start, I've got a tonne of questions about that all these little things, but help bring in other specialists are there? I mean, I don't I don't even know I don't even know, like committees are?48:55  Well, hopefully, a discussion like this helps. Right? For starters, right? It was one of the reasons. I mean, hopefully doctors watching this who are board certified specialists who are intrigued and have heard how much this can help will apply to get the programme. It's very simple for doctors to get in. You, you just provide your Texas Medical licence number, I think and your board certification number and the Department of Public Safety checks those two things. And that's pretty much the extent of it, you become registered and at that point, they very much leave things up to the doctor. That's one of the great things about the programme is Let's trust the doctors.49:33  So in this case, not knowing enough about that. I'm like, Well wait till my specific specialty, it just there was neurology, oncology, pain, internal medicine. There was a lot of specialists so if there's a physician listening to this, go check it out, because more likely you're there. I'm just saying that gastroenterology was one of the few that was not listed.49:55  I can I can certainly bring that up with them and ask, you know, we can get If we can get that specialty added, I'm surprised it's not on there.50:02  That was eight months ago, nine months ago, something like that. Maybe it is I haven't checked recently. But I thought, well, it should50:11  be one of the things I think you should be is. And I actually learned this from you in our very first phone call. One of the treatable conditions, which I don't think I listed before is called spasticity. And it is unlike everything else on the list for your very intelligent audience. They know as soon as I say that they're like, which one is not like the other spasticity is a symptom, am I correct, and everything else is a sort of a disease or condition. And you informed me that much of what happens between the mouse the top and the bottom, you know, by the way, for those who don't know, if you get on a phone call with a gastroenterologist, it can get like, it was unexpected. I was not expecting to have that conversation. In my day. I'm on the phone. I'm like, Whoa, because we went top to bottom, or you did, but apparently, it's all a lot of it's muscle. And there can be spasms in that muscle spasticity in the muscle, and that is a treatable condition.51:03  It's nerves innervating muscles and the muscles if they go into spasm create tremendous pain. And if you're ever worked in ER, and you ask an ER physician, what's the what's some of the most common complaints, it's abdominal pain. Now that can be all the way from a perforated bowel appendicitis. But a lot of times people just get labelled, Oh, you've got a bug or IBS, and then they get sent out. That's it's a huge chunk, because it covers so much territory. So yeah, for spasticity. If we can get the spasticity handled, I can help so many people, my cebo people. So if you have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, one of the reasons why you have so much pain is because the bacteria produce gas, which stretch the intestines, in a reflex, the intestines trying to track back, that's a spasm, this is reminiscent of our phone call together. except you're eating at the time. When somebody poops like this, you want to make sure that52:06  I'm kind of curious about if if, in the new, you put it in these words, if a if a interested position, or one on the fence, even we're, we're considering this, and you've already talked about what it takes to get approved. So let's talk a little bit about what's the experience like to be that practitioner. For one, you write a, an opioid, or what something has a highly addictive property, or even if it's classified that way, it's called a controlled substance. And then in Texas until recently, we always came with the paper, triplicate, I mean, there was a there was a form to do so. So what's it like? What's the process for the writing of the prescription? And the experience going through your company? And what is the physician See? How is it dispensed? What's the fall ill insurance your ongoing?52:52  Sure. A challenge for a patient can be finding a doctor who can prescribe we've tried to help with that by we have we have a virtual clinic on our website. So if you go to good blend calm, you can actually see a doctor through telehealth, it's one of the very great things the state of Texas has done is enabled telehealth for this programme, which is super exciting. You can see a doctor through a telehealth appointment or you can go to a doctor's office and see them there. They're either either the doctor will diagnose you with one of the treatable conditions, or you bring your medical records from a different doctor who's, for instance, if you had a patient and in their chart, and you'd put spasms of the gutter specificity, or they could actually take that chart to another doctor and get a prescription.53:37  That is fantastic video. So as somebody who's learning and I'm risk averse, and all these things, I just don't want to I want to make sure that I follow the lay of the wall, which is why I stopped when my own specialty wasn't there. That is fantastic to know that I can say look I can right now I'm not comfortable doing it. But I truly believe that you could benefit from this, please go to this website. Set up a virtual visit. Show them this note, fax them my clinic note 100% Oh, that's54:08  easy fan. TAs this, that's awesome news because it actually allows a physician on the fence or is worried about blowback from maybe their own partners, they can now safely dip their toe in the water and say, Look, I've got a pathway for you to get we have doctors that do this all the time.54:21  Oh my gosh, that is great. You're exactly right. When I first started doing CBD, one of my partners grabbed all my all my pamphlets and said brown wants to sell weed in our clinic. That's fine, but I'm not taking part of it. Not a joke. So and then if I actually,54:37  you know because there's just this much misinformation and and the people don't educate themselves. That is awesome. Because what are we talking about here and you said it you started off this interview. We want to help people and the people we want to help as the patients and you don't care if you're getting the credit as the doctor who is being in this position to do Do that. This is about the patient who comes in and says I hurt or I can't get over it or I as you said with the with the kiddo I can't feel. Let's get them on a route to do so if you're uncomfortable doing it's fine. Let them take what you found with them and then and then head over to G website55:18  not to digress really quick. But when you said that I can feel for the first time imagine your child who you love dearly that has never been able to express love can then express that because of this because you got them off these meds as living that's living. Yeah. That's, that's awesome.55:38  Yeah, it's fantastic. Oh, and I know you didn't mean to digress, but I am curious though. Yeah. Once they rot55:44  that continues a journey for Yeah, sure. So that everything the patient record for the programme lives on a Texas website. It's the it's called curtsy u RT, the Compassionate use registry of Texas. A prescribing doctor would go into it's it's an online service, but you go into you log into that service. And then you create a new patient profile for your new patient. And then you create a prescription for that patient. And so your prescription you have they give ultimate flexibility for how you want to write this prescription. The ones we recommend are flexible to give the patient flexibility. So you would specify here's the milligrammes of THC, I think would work for you over a an X day period. So this prescription is going to exist for 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, we recommend 90 days, because I think one of things we've learned from the the, like the CVS is in the Walgreens of the world is that you can write that longer prescription you're going to get better compliance for for the second round of dispensations, but so 90 day prescription, this much THC and milligrammes and then you have to specify the means of administration, you can get very specific with that you can say, it's got to be tincture, or got to be a gummy, or there's a box that says, I think it says other any means other any means. And then there's a notes field. And so what you could say to a patient is, so you do all that. And you could say I recommend you start with this in the morning, this in the evening. And if you want to dabble with your, you know, try, try this and see how it works for you, you can try that too. So that all exists in an electronic record. The next step then is for the patient to contact, good blend. And then we they tell us their identifying information, we pull up that patient record and that prescription and we're able to dispense against that one opportunity for improvement in the programme. And some doctors do this some don't is you think about it, when the patient leaves that appointment. You know how this goes, I can't I can't remember really half what a doctor says when I leave that appointment, cuz it's a high stress, time. And when you get home, I have trouble remembering what the doctor said. So we do recommend you give the patient something that says, here's what I'm prescribing you, or you send them a follow up email and says, here's, here's the prescription I gave you, otherwise, they don't remember what you're prescribed. And then we're the ones reminding them, Hey, your doctor prescribed X, Y and Z. But that's the process. So you see a doctor doctor interest, the prescription into the compassionate use registry of Texas patient contacts us we dispense against that in terms of getting the medicine and products to patients. We offer a lot of different ways to do that. We started out as 100% a delivery model. So we were delivering to patients homes. We've recently added the the ability for patients to come into certain doctor's offices and pick up their what they've ordered. And even more recently, we've added the ability. It's almost like a miniature retail experience. But we bring unassigned product into the doctor's office, and a patient could walk right out of your appointment. you've entered their prescription and occurred and we can they can shop right there and buy what they want. And then so a one stop shop.58:50  Let me clarify that really quick. So you're saying that a physician can actually have product in their office and they can sell it directly to the patient.58:59  We do the selling? Yes. Okay. We are there in the in the lobby or wherever, wherever we are and patient comes in and they they see what we have to offer and then they buy what the prescription says and sorry, pharmacy extension, essentially essentially I'm okay. Okay,59:13  so just one small caveat on this journey, so far, so much like, just so that people don't think that a physician is just guessing what the milligrammes are, whenever a new minute, whenever a new medication comes out that isn't cannabis. They utilise representative representatives to go and educate a physician. I doesn't matter if it's a new blood pressure medication. Every blood pressure medication that you've ever taken has had a representative go in and basically detail a physician on that. So I would imagine that there is a detailing process on best practices, things to look for cues. Correct. Thank you for bringing that up.59:51  Yes, we as you would a physician would not be guessing. We have we have dosing guides. In For instance, if you want the prescription to be 90 days long. And you're thinking about prescribing x, we have a recommended daily dose and just multiply by 19. Put that into the prescription. So yes, we, we provide all those sorts of collateral educational material and that1:00:09  kind of stuff. I mean, that's, that's not unique just to cannabis. I mean, we do that literally with every single pharmaceutical that has ever been rolled out. Physicians practitioners need to be educated on it. So this, love this because this is no different. And except for that it is because people have worried away from it. And I think it shouldn't1:00:31  be different, right? And we're getting to the point where it's not sure I got here, you one other way, it's similar to the way prescriptions work in the pharmaceutical side is, if a patient were to call us or, or ask for something that was slightly different than what you prescribed, then we have the ability to contact the prescribing doctor and say, Hey, the patient is interested in this slightly different than what you prescribe. So for instance, let's say you, you check the box for tincture, and the patient decides they want to try our 12 ounce beverage or patient wants to try gummies might be in the same ratio might even be the same dose, it's just a different means of administration, we're able to contact you and say, Are you okay? If the patient gets this instead, and then we just write the note into the look like a little hamster typing there. We just write the note into the, into the prescription.1:01:21  But I mean, that happens with generics and name brands and regular pharmaceuticals, too. So I mean, I think I think it's awesome that y'all it's it's completely your legitimising something that should have been legitimise a very, very long time ago. I love that you'll have that in your model. Yeah, it's1:01:36  transparent. Yeah. I love how that's, that's well. And also, let's, since you brought it up several times, let's talk about these different means of administering. If you have examples, like what what are some of the things that you that you've seen your practitioners have success with that some of the clients the patients seem to like, because a lot of people don't realise A lot of people think oh, I, I don't I just have to smoke it. Right. That's the only thing that that it's there for it. So this is a medicinal product. What are some of the ways? Sure, sure.1:02:06  So we started with started with tinctures back in the our first first couple months and and that was when the programme was in early days of the programme. I should back up a second say. One thing to note about the Texas compassionate use programme is we are capped at a THC maximum currently of 0.5%. by weight. If you know your you know the world of cannabis, you're thinking that's a very small amount of THC. It goes up to 1% starting September 1 based on most recent legislation, but one of the things we realised is that if depending on what the product is what depending what the means of administration is 0.5% can actually be a lot right the heavier the other ingredients are. The more you can get in there more THC you can put in the product and still stay below the 0.5% limit. So we had tinctures for a while and then we moved on to Los Angeles. We were the first company in the state to come out with an edible product like that it was lozenges meant to kind of dissolve in your mouth and for absorption of the cannabinoids after lozenges, we came out with gummies we're the first in the state come out with gummies we have one to one CBD THC ratio gummies and we have five milligrammes THC straight up. And in those gummies we've got different terpene profiles, we've got a sativa profile and indika profile that that's getting our doctors from prescribing flexibility we see you know, common common prescription might be take the one to one gummy, that's sativa in the morning, because it can be more stimulating and it's not you know, it's a one to one CBD THC so you have those working together. But when you're getting ready for bed, take the five milligramme indika gummy which can can be relaxing and can help you sleep. So those gummies really helped with prescribing flexibility. We then came out with lotions. So we've got some topical products, which now again you have to have one of the treatable conditions. But if you also have some other symptoms that could be helped by our medicines, then you're in the programme. Sure you have access to everything once you're in the programme. We launched medical capsules, which is a really nice, very precise dosing product for doctors. And then most recently, we were the first. By the way, all of these were first in the state. We most recently launched our 12 ounce beverage cannabis infused beverage, which I guess I have since I brought pot props, I might as well show the prop. It's empty because right now we don't have a prescription. But all these are getting great feedback I'd say are1:04:47  the most popular. What are some of the other products that you brought. These1:04:50  are all empty, of course there's our gummies here, these are the Texas Orange City, the five milligrammes I got one of our lotion, one of our topical lotion jars, here. Sure. Thank you for asking that question because one of the things I should mention is one of the things we did launch, this is our dream tincture. So it's it's designed with a terpene profile for evening use. Yeah, but one of the things we also did with this tincture, and it's a different bottles that we added, lowers, they can go to our website and see a nice rendering of the bottle. But one of things we did with this launch of the dream tincture is we had a

How Long Gone
233. - Chris & Jason

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 93:36


One-on-one pod today recorded from New York and Italy, we made this episode longer and beefier to fill you up until Friday while I finish my summer in Amalfi. Chris and Jason chat about Nespresso, TJ's weight gain, roman fashion reports, the pains of eating pasta for breakfast lunch and dinner for 2 weeks straight, hot waiters with black eyes hitting on my chick, the beach club, the male prostitute lifestyle in Italy, caesar mode activated, getting cat-called by teen boys, what black Air Force ones mean in Italy, vacation is trash, international covid regulations, cigarette updates, Xanax, and we spend the last 40 minutes talking about Certified Lover Boy. https://twitter.com/donetodeath https://twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk ep. 380 - 08.25.2021 - BLOOD BOT BABYLON: FDA, Trump Bait, Evil Advertising, Cuomo Killer, AI, Clones - CCNT 380 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com PAYPAL: https://bit.ly/3v59fkR MEET UPS: https://CanaryCryMeetUps.com   INTRO 5:02 Tony Hawk to sell 100 skateboards painted in his literal blood…for climate change (Input Mag)   FLIPPY 11:34 Restaurant chain acquires MIT start up for salad making robots (Boston Globe)   NEWSOM SCIENCE 17:30 Xanax, Meth, Guns, Ballots…nothing to see here. (Daily Caller) Larry Elder targeted by media: Financial probe (Newsweek), High and waving gun (SF Chron)   PANDEMIC SPECIAL 27:52 Oregon outdoor mask mandates implemented (AP) 75 Doctors stage a “walk out”…or did they? (Insider) FDA fully approves Pfizer jab (NY Times) [En_Pnuemati email] Source: Top 10 corporate fines ever paid [Pfizer 4th, J&J 5th] (The Richest) Dr. Robert Malone (inventor or mRNA jab) on clarifying approval, War Room with Bannon (Clip) Note: Robert Malone back story and fascinating history (The Atlantic)   Resources for exemption:  Rutherford Institute passing legal test for exemption letter (Variations 1, 2) Other mandate info from Liberty Counsel and FAQ Other questions that should be asked   WACCINE/TRUMP 1:17:42 Trump supporters on why they're unvaccinated, hit piece (CNN,

Canary Cry News Talk
BLOOD BOT BABYLON

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 260:47


Canary Cry News Talk ep. 380 - 08.25.2021 - BLOOD BOT BABYLON: FDA, Trump Bait, Evil Advertising, Cuomo Killer, AI, Clones - CCNT 380 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com PAYPAL: https://bit.ly/3v59fkR MEET UPS: https://CanaryCryMeetUps.com   INTRO 5:02 Tony Hawk to sell 100 skateboards painted in his literal blood…for climate change (Input Mag)   FLIPPY 11:34 Restaurant chain acquires MIT start up for salad making robots (Boston Globe)   NEWSOM SCIENCE 17:30 Xanax, Meth, Guns, Ballots…nothing to see here. (Daily Caller) Larry Elder targeted by media: Financial probe (Newsweek), High and waving gun (SF Chron)   PANDEMIC SPECIAL 27:52 Oregon outdoor mask mandates implemented (AP) 75 Doctors stage a “walk out”…or did they? (Insider) FDA fully approves Pfizer jab (NY Times) [En_Pnuemati email] Source: Top 10 corporate fines ever paid [Pfizer 4th, J&J 5th] (The Richest) Dr. Robert Malone (inventor or mRNA jab) on clarifying approval, War Room with Bannon (Clip) Note: Robert Malone back story and fascinating history (The Atlantic)   Resources for exemption:  Rutherford Institute passing legal test for exemption letter (Variations 1, 2) Other mandate info from Liberty Counsel and FAQ Other questions that should be asked   WACCINE/TRUMP 1:17:42 Trump supporters on why they're unvaccinated, hit piece (CNN, Clip) Trump is finally pushing jab, why it's too late, and it's ALL HIS FAULT! (Vanity Fair)   WANNA BE WACCINATED 1:41:27 Ultra-Vaxxed Israel Crisis is DIRE WARNING for America!! (Daily Beast) Israel prime minister, “second dose faded against delta…get third jab” (Quote) New study, billions jabbed at risk of Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (Daily Expose, Study) They asked 6 advertisers on how to convince unjabbed (Business Insider)   BREAK (producer party) 2:26:00   POLYTICK/CUOMO 3:18:15 Biden pushes 6uild 6ack 6etter over Afghanistan (Fox) CIA Chief secretly met Taliban leader (NBC Clip) Source: CIA used Viagra to bride Taliban (TabletMag) Headline: Cuomo stripped of his Emmy (NBC News) Cuomo abandons dog at mansion (Vanity Fair) Cuomo commutes 4 convicted murderers' sentences in final hour as Governor (Fox) Headline: Cathy Hochul becomes NY's first female Governor (AP)   AI/DEMONIC POWER 3:53:06 Tiny Neural sensors the size of salt grains for brain computer interface (MedGadget) Headline: AI can erase our minds and steal our bodies (TNW) This massive AI chip has compute power of human brain (PC World) Headline: Brain implant creates feelings in fingertips (TNW) Revelation 9:20, 1 Timothy 4:2   ADDITIONAL STORIES Smallest bio-super-capacitor provides energy for biomedical applications (Phys Org) US Military must prepare now for DeepFake POW (C4ISR Net opinion) Moderna, 6 month effectiveness pre-print study in Lancet (The Lancet) Israeli Japanese partnership launch Autonomous robots (No Camels)  Many celebrities already have cloned pets (GZero Clip) Custom songs produced by robots (Electrek) Milk Crate Challenge is trending (Today) YouTuber Boy Boy snuck into secret arms-dealer conference (YouTube) Push to ban killer robots gets Pope and Vatican boost (Catholic Review) A New World of robot-human interoperability is dawning (Forbes) AI Robot arm for inspection (Automation World) Unique robot designs and why they are here to stay (Yanko Design) Samsung splurges $200 bn to prep for “New Future Order” (The Register) Throwback: Jan 2016, FBI prevented mass masonic temple shooting (Daily Beast) These robots can move your couch (Science Daily) University of Kentucky, food delivery robot deployed (WKYT, clip) Can robots evolve into machines of loving grace? (Wired) Shapeshifting robots, the latest developments (Analytics Insight) Afghan female robotics team defiant as they flee Taliban to Qatar (NBC News) Afghan female robotics team defiant as they flee Taliban to Mexico (Reuters)   PRODUCERS ep. 380: SIR HOLMES: Good and Faithful knight of the CANARIUM Derek PR**, Dame Lynn: Lady of the Lakes**, Marsha M, Scott K, Cherie H, Aaron W, Dustin H, Classy B, Brian H, Rebekah B, Aaron J, James H, Juan A, Valli V, Malik W, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Laura C, Tinfoil Hat Man, Big Tank, Veronica D, Brandt W, JC, Kim W, OverTheRainbow, Gail M, Runksmash, Ciara, David D, Shawnta M, Ellen S   TIMESTAMPS: Jade Bouncerson   JINGLES: The Day's Upon Us Mike   ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Mark A

Too Much Effing Perspective
2. Ex-Morrissey bandmate Matt Walker on why some drummers spontaneously combust...and some don't

Too Much Effing Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 47:30


Matt Walker shares the inside scoop on what it's like to work with two of the most brilliant and challenging guys in rock music (Morrissey and Smashing Pumpkins' Billy Corgan); how he was forced to lie to a Russian border guard when touring with Garbage; and why destroying a drum kit each night is better than taking Xanax. Please note: Matt's audio quality during the conversation is a bit rough -- a hazard of recording over the Internet during the pandemic. But it's a great conversation that's worth a close listen. Thanks for understanding.

MJBulls
Cannabis Business Advisors | Sara Gullickson

MJBulls

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 12:01


Her aim in this pandemic is to become the Xanax for her clients.  “If we take a fee from somebody we have to do the best possible job”.   With over 12-years of industry experience that includes creating many companies, working as a CEO of a publicly trading cannabis company and being awarded multi-state medical marijuana licenses; Sara Gullickson is the cannabis industries top consultant.    Sara's passion to spread the cannabis culture across the United States by helping companies get licenses while managing and growing their company operations.  She joins Dan Humiston to shares how the pandemic has affected her new cannabis company and how the processing and screening of cannabis businesses has changed.  In addition, she predicts what the cannabis scene will look like in 2021. Produce  by PodCONX MJBulls - https://podconx.com/podcasts/raising-cannabis-capitalDan Humiston - https://podconx.com/guests/dan-humistonSara Gullickson - https://podconx.com/guests/sara-gullicksonLinkedinInstagramFacebookTwitter

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

In this episode I talk about dumbing it down - I have come to see that nothing valuable for the spirit is complicated. 

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.
Episode #227 - "Take 'The Gossip Challenge'"

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 15:47


In this episode I talk about gossip and talking behind people's backs. And I propose a challenge. 

Big Energy with Kassi Underwood
21. How I Self-Healed Anxiety

Big Energy with Kassi Underwood

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 28:14


Kassi talks about hitting rock bottom with anxiety and shares the 5 most important changes she made to self-heal. Contents include: a bottle of Xanax, gluten free food, bold-faced lies Kassi has told, tips to stop people-pleasing, the infamous “zero” meditation, and much more.

You Learn You Turn
Lively conversations on addiction, recovery and mental health

You Learn You Turn

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 57:22


Sam Kleckley openly shares his story of xanax addiction and how he ultimately found a life of health, balance, and success. As a person in recovery, he knows the worst part of being caught in addiction is the feeling that you are all alone. His podcast, Live Life in Motion, shines the light on those that have overcome adversity. He hopes that anyone that hears his podcast and is struggling will feel less alone. Edwin McCain is a singer/songwriter and part of the youturn family. He too has shared openly about his substance use disorder so others will feel more comfortable asking for help.These two made for quite a lively discussion!See below for Sam's Podcast information: Welcome to Live Life in Motion. A podcast designed to motivate you to become the best version of yourself. Episodes will feature guests from all walks of life, including experts in the field of mental and physical well-being.We will share stories from individuals that have overcome adversity and pushed forward in life, as well as insights on the tools and techniques that helped them excel.Each of us is destined for success and here you will learn how to unlock your untapped potential.Click subscribe and start living life to the fullest. Check us out on Instagram @LiveLifeinMotion

The Twitch and MJ Podcast Podcast

A man high on Meth and Xanax stumbled into a kid's party... Methy the Clown was born! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Required Readcast
#24: The Old Man and the Sea

Required Readcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 51:26


It's time for that classic summer beach read, The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway! Grab your fishing pole and Xanax, and join Jess and Lauren as they debrief the most demoralizing fishing story ever written. (Thanks for nothing, Papa.) Like us on FB, follow us on Twitter and Insta and pick up a copy of A Wrinkle in Time to join in on our next month's book! Theme music and lyrics by Max McEwan and Noah Wilson, vocals by Erin C. Willis.

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.
Episode #226 - "How Do I Know If I Should Make Amends?"

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 19:58


In this episode I talk about an e-mail I received concerning amends.  How do you know if you should make an amends?WEBSITE ////// INSTAGRAM

Over the Rainbow - Achieving Mental Health for Real
Amie - As long as the cuts are not too deep

Over the Rainbow - Achieving Mental Health for Real

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 49:22


Please join me and Samantha Hudson as she tells the story of her daughter of 13 slipping through the cracks of the UK CAMHS(Child and Adolescence Mental Health Services) system. Amie is suffering in silence, forced to cut herself to relieve the anguish of anxiety and depression. Her mother is hoping to raise Money so Amie can get real help from a private psychiatrist and mental hospital. CAMHS is government Health care which is failing our children. No child should have to endure the mental pain without any medicine to give relieve and no way to get a simple anxiety dulling medicine like Xanax. Sam also suffers from mental illness. which she is enduring. Anyone who knows the Demons of severe anxiety and depression must hear the cries of our Children. This show will never have a commercial, but i am asking you to please read and listen to Amie's story and donate if you can help get this girl get the care that she needs. I know her pain and without the Xanax I would be cutting too. Amie's attacker was a classmate who even her mother does not know what she was put through. But it was not just bullying it was sexual abuse that has aggravated Amie's depression or CPTSD. I know this is not so popular of a show about how to recover for real. i am dedicating my life to get the message out. medicine is needed at times and Mental health is a physical disease that can not be treated in every case with just therapy, meditation or cannabas. People pop advil and Tylenol with out batting an eye, but mental Illness needs to be always cured by talking or singing or whatever the new fad is. I am in the game because of the right medicines that treat a very physical problem. Please Donate what you can and share the link so others can help. It's a sad statement that teenagers need to turn to NF for validation. Someone to tell them that they are ok. Amie doesn't even have a counselor to help her. It just her and her mom. The father has left her child in the hands of strangers. Please help if you can. I love you all without conditions. Maybe with a little luck we can make a dent in the stigma of mental Illness and recovery for the sake of the world. People in the UK fight back and demand better treatment for our children. Listen to this story, the story of politics and ineptness and pure meanness from the people that suppose to help. Amie is not getting help, so her mother is campaigning on her behave so ease her pain. What are we doing as Amie is suffering without end. Please help. If not money Share or people in the UK speak up and be counted before its too late for Amie. There is only one link: https://gofund.me/92333d9b

Recovery Elevator
RE 338: Old Narratives

Recovery Elevator

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 53:07


Episode 338 – Old Narratives   On today's podcast we've got Rebecca she took his last drink on October 22, 2019, she is from Madison Wisconsin, and  is 31 years old.   Finding Your Better You Highlights When we don't know the root of our triggers, when we don't know the narratives that are ingrained in our brains and in our souls.  We think something is wrong with us. And when we think something is wrong with us, we feel shame. Part of taking responsibility of your healing is knowing yourself, so that you can get outside of this shame cycle and can walk the bridge over to self-empathy. When I know myself better, I can zoom out and see what was happening in my mind, understand myself better and allows me to manage my relationships differently. This makes me navigate my cravings better, because mine come when I feel this belief of, I am not considered.   Look within and find some narratives that are living inside of you? Stories that live in the past, yet they are being perpetuated in your present life. We can re-write those stories. But only until we detect them.   Insights from Rebecca's Journey   [09:18] Kris introduces Rebecca.  Rebecca began drinking at age 14 and she hated it.   She was afraid of drinking because her dad was in law enforcement.  She noticed a shift in her drinking at age 25.  In 2011, her dad went to prison and that trauma had a huge impact on her life.  She was also a victim of domestic violence.  She thanks alcohol for getting her through terrible times and for the life she has now.  Rebecca's drinking became all day drinking because she was isolated, alone, and bored.  She would binge drink to soothe loneliness.  She was falling apart, other than work.    She began listening to recovery podcasts and reached out to her employee assistance office.  She entered a therapy group that helped with alcohol addiction and trauma. She was holding on some trauma from her past that became an excuse for drinking.  She was stuck in a Day 1 cycle and a shame cycle. She went to rehab and detoxed from alcohol and Xanax.  It was a very structured program that gave her some tools.    Learning to connect was important for Rebecca.  She leaned in heavily on AA and found a local community of sober women.  She is now very engaged with Café RE which has helped keep her sober.  She constantly evaluates her program. She continues to suffer from anxiety and depression, but she isn't alone anymore.  She really wants to give back and is now able to do so.  She always challenges the narrative recognizing that a bad day can be turned around.   Rebecca said, keep it simple!    Kris' Message Kris is celebrating four years of continuous sobriety.   He shared a quote from Marianne Williamson, “Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate.  Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.  It is our light, not our darkness that frightens us most.  We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous.  Actually, who are you not to be?  Playing small does not serve the world.  We born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us.  As we let our own light shine, we give others permission to do the same.”  Take some time to recognize the work you are doing.  Resist the urge to minimize yourself.  You are a gift to this world.  You deserve happiness.    It all starts from the inside out.   Sponsor Exact Nature re20@exactnature.com Shout out to The Chocolate Moose, a Bozeman Retreat Sponsor.   https://www.thechocolatemoose406.com/ @thechocolatemoose406 on Instagram     Upcoming events, retreats, and courses: Bozeman 2021 You can find more information about our events including Costa Rica and Denver   Resources Connect with Cafe RE - Use the promo code OPPORTUNITY to waive the set-up fee. Recovery Elevator YouTube - Subscribe here! Sobriety Tracker iTunes   

Medicine, Marriage & Money
48. How Conversational Intelligence affects our relationships with Dr. Linda Street

Medicine, Marriage & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 50:07


I encourage you to reach out to me at katemangona@medicinemarriageandmoney.com with any questions, concerns, or suggestions! For a free copy of The Medical Marriage Survival Guide: An Instruction Manual For Physicians in Love E-book/Workbook?→ Visit https://library.medicinemarriageandmoney.com/the-medical-marriage  and I will send it to you! If you spent less time arguing with your spouse, what would your life look like? → sign up to find out at https://www.medicinemarriageandmoney.com and click “I AM READY” for a free 60-minute coaching consult! Let me coach you! I can show you what is possible.   WHAT YOU WILL DISCOVER IN THIS EPISODE   Medicine:  The inappropriate conversation and Falling in love with her hairdresser Why she calls her hubby her human Xanax   Marriage:  The firecracker and the volcano (fizzles out and destruction) Learning to take ownership over my experiences instead of controlling his Money: Why asking for money is not greedy How feeling undervalued affects how we practice medicine Negotiation: What is conversational intelligence What is negotiation How to create positive reactions with words How to create a higher trust, co-creative placed The addiction of being right   TAKE HOME POINTS FROM Dr. Linda Street Negotiation does not have a winner and a loser, especially in marriage. This is a discussion where we WANT to agree. Why would we want our spouses to feel they could not trust us or not share their ideas?  Language selection is SO IMPORTANT  in our conversations- appreciative over judgemental. I really want to understand...how can we parent in a way that we are both happy with instead of “Why did you…..” judgey to defensive mode, We both want to parent our children so they don't end up in prison. Culturally we have been conditioned to be right...an addiction to be right! Negotiating with our patients...What are their concerns? Why won't they take the medication or follow our advice??? We have the same goals right? HEALTH!!! Stay curious! WALK AWAY ASKING YOURSELF Who is my human Xanax? Am I addicted to being right? How can I approach my next conversation with language that creates a higher trust? How can I foster conversational intelligence amongst my children, spouse, and co-workers?    FEATURED ON THIS SHOW Website: www.simplystreetmd.com,  Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/simply-worth-it-physician-negotiations/id1548597809 Facebook: Www.facebook.com/groups/negotiather   *This podcast is a member of the Doctor Podcast Network

Luke Ford
HBO's Alex Gibney Doco Crime of the Century (8-5-21)

Luke Ford

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 67:05


The Opium Wars: https://lukeford.net/blog/?p=70956 https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-crime-of-the-century-tv-review-2021 What would America have been like without slavery? https://www.takimag.com/article/alternative-america/ Peter Zeihan on the geo-politics of Latin America, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVrNWPltr6g Covid deaths in 2021: https://www.statista.com/statistics/1101932/coronavirus-covid19-cases-and-deaths-number-us-americans/ https://www.healthsystemtracker.org/brief/covid-19-continues-to-be-a-leading-cause-of-death-in-the-u-s-in-june-2021/ Dr. Marcia Angell writes in the New York Review of Books in 2018: The problem with these three books, and it's a big one, is that they treat the Purdue story as though it were the whole story of the opioid epidemic. But OxyContin did not give rise to opioid addiction, although it jump-started the current epidemic. Heroin has been a common street drug ever since it was banned in 1924. Morphine has also been widely abused. Nor would taking OxyContin off the market end the epidemic. The overwhelming majority of opioid deaths are caused not by OxyContin but by combinations of fentanyl, heroin, and cocaine, often brought in from China via Mexican cartels, and frequently taken along with benzodiazepines (such as Valium or Xanax) and alcohol. These drugs are cheaper and stronger, particularly fentanyl. Fentanyl was first synthesized in 1960, and soon became widely used as an anesthetic and powerful painkiller. It is legally manufactured and highly effective when used appropriately, often for short medical procedures such as colonoscopies. The illicit production and street use is relatively new, but it is now the main cause of most opioid-related deaths (nearly 90 percent in Massachusetts). The steady increase in opioid deaths after OxyContin came on the market has been supplanted by a much faster increase starting around 2013, when heroin and fentanyl use increased dramatically. We now have two epidemics—the overuse of prescription drugs and the much more deadly and now largely unrelated epidemic of street drugs. By concentrating on the first, we are closing the barn door after the horse is long gone. https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/12/06/opioid-nation/ Julia Lovell writes in her excellent 2015 book, The Opium War: Drugs, Dreams, and the Making of Modern China: The missionaries became natural allies of the smugglers: when they first arrived on the coast of China, they docked among opium traders on the island of Lintin; they interpreted for them in exchange for passages up the coast, distributing tracts while the drug was taken onshore; and in the Chinese Repository, Canton's leading English-language publication, they shared a forum for spreading their views on the urgent need to open China, by whatever means necessary. By the 1830s, merchants and missionaries alike favoured violence. ‘[W]hen an opponent supports his argument with physical force, [the Chinese] can be crouching, gentle, and even kind', observed Karl Gützlaff, a stout Pomeranian missionary who would, during the Opium War, lead the British military occupation of parts of eastern China, running armies of Chinese spies and collaborators. The slightest provocation would do. In 1831, traders had written to the government in India, demanding a fleet of warships to avenge the Chinese authorities' partial demolition of a front garden that the British had illegally requisitioned…

Banshees and Booze
Ep 137 - Open the Porcelain Throne Gates

Banshees and Booze

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 55:51


Not to brag, but we're "central air on 76 degrees" rich, y'all! It's time to strap on your carabiners and take a Xanax for that claustrophobia of yours, because this week we're talking HAUNTED CAVES!!! Yes, Tami's meditation space has been forever ruined by this research, but that's ok because she got to drink! Amie talks not one but TWO haunted caves; one in jolly old cursed AF England, and one in the "definitely discovered by white dudes" Grand Canyon. Tami puts in 0.5% effort by reading directly from a link shared by a listener (thanks, Carter!), and both of them put their emotional intellegence to the test by starting us off with a 3 minute therapy session. That is... if Amie decided to record this time BOOM, SHOTS FIRED *air horn noise*!!! . We're Social!: www.bansheesandbooze.com www.instagram.com/bansheesandbooze www.twitter.com/bansheesnbooze . Theme Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ . Artwork: Laura de Mooij www.instagram.com/disneybabydoll/

Get Lit Minute
Morgan Parker | “Heaven Be a Xanax”

Get Lit Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 6:18


In this week's episode of the Get Lit Minute, your weekly poetry podcast, we spotlight American poet, novelist, and editor, Morgan Parker. "Heaven Be A Xanax"When people say how are youI say goodIt is a rule no one can answerCrying in The Gap by my therapist's officeor I am still angry with my parentsfor traumatizing methrough organized sportsDangerous and satisfying body of waterI can almost remember heavenor Still a woman slaughtered for wonderor Unfortunately misplaced gripI am not doing a good job waitingWhen I get to heaven I'm goingto wear my good braso no one can stay mad at meI won't have any feelings to hurt justcheeseburgers on cheeseburgers ondeep colored slumberJust men offering their golden bodiesAnd I will take the offering on my tongueAnd it will not be a vaultAnd someone will not invade meAnd I will kneel to prayAnd I will address the prayer to myselfAnd I will be allowedSupport the show (https://getlit.org/donate/)

Strokecast
Understanding Post Stroke Depression

Strokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 48:06


  Click here for a macine generated transcript   Surviving a stroke is not the end of a medical issue. It's the start of a new journey, with new challenges. Major depression is often one of those challenges. It interferes with recovery, rehab, adjusting to a new life, and maintaining relationships. In short, it's big problem. And it's pretty common. According to new research by Dr. Laura Stein from the Icahn School of medicine, depression after stroke is twice as likely to occur as depression after heart attack. There's something unique about stroke that leads to depression. On top of that, if a person lived with Generalized Anxiety Disorder before stroke, they are 1.7 x as likely to experience Major Depression after stroke. In this conversation, Dr. Laura Stein talk about her research and what survivors, caregivers, and medical practitioners need to know. Bio Laura K. Stein, MD, MPH is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and attending physician at the Mount Sinai and Mount Sinai Queens Stroke Centers. She is board certified in Neurology and Vascular Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Stein received a BA from Amherst College and her MD and MPH from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She completed her internship, neurology residency, and vascular neurology fellowship at Mount Sinai.  Dr. Stein's interests are in stroke clinical care, stroke outcomes research, and medical education. She is the Neurology Residency Associate Program Director and precepts first year medical students in the Art and Science of Medicine preclinical skills course. Dr. Stein received the Department of Neurology Resident Class of 2020 Award of Appreciation for Dedication & Commitment Towards Excellence in Mentorship and 2020 Institute for Medical Education Excellence in Teaching Award.  The Research Dr. Stein's research was part of the American Stroke Association's virtual International Stroke Conference. You can read the paper here. You can read the article where I first encountered her work here. The approach of looking at depression after heart attack vs looking at depression after stroke is an interesting one. It's a nice way of controlling for other potential causes. The research looked at Medicare recipients, Medicare is a US government health insurance program, generally for folks 65 and older. It lets researchers draw from a rich collection of data. There are two significant tradeoffs, of course. First, it's restricted to the US so there's no international representation in the study. Obviously, depending on the research question in particular, that may or may not be an issue. Second, it's restricted to folks 65 and older. Can we say that the results of this study apply to younger stroke survivors? Maybe? Probably? We don't know. And this study was not designed to answer that question. I'd say it does get us closer, though, and it opens up an opportunity to do further research that asks different but related questions. That's what good studies do. The answer specific question with solid evidence and clear analysis. And the result can introduce new questions for researchers to explore in different studies. In the meantime, it's likely safe to say, that regardless of age, stroke survivors are probably more likely to experience depression, and the community needs to be vigilant for the signs of depression and seek treatment accordingly. Symptoms of Major Depression Diagnosing depression involves identifying symptoms from a couple lists. To "earn" a depression diagnosis, a patient needs 5 symptoms from list 1 and all 4 from list 2. They are: List 1 (Pick 5 or more) Depressed Mood (most days) Loss of Interest or pleasure Weight loss or gain Insomnia or hypersomnia (nearly every day) Psychomotor agitation or limitation Fatigue (nearly every day) Feelings worthless or experiencing inappropriate guilt Decreased concentration (nearly everyday) Thoughts of death or suicide List 2 (All 4) Symptoms cause significant distress or social/professional impairment Symptoms not attributable to a substance or medical condition Symptoms not explained by another disorder No history of manic episodes You can read more details about the symptoms here. You can probably see one of the issues. Many of those symptoms may be directly attributed to the disabilities and brain damage of the stroke without it being Major Depression. That's why it's important to work with a medical professional to tease them apart. Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder Generalized Anxiety Disorder is about more than feeling nervous. It's more complicated and severe. The National Institute of Mental Health describes it this way: People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) display excessive anxiety or worry, most days for at least 6 months, about a number of things such as personal health, work, social interactions, and everyday routine life circumstances. The fear and anxiety can cause significant problems in areas of their life, such as social interactions, school, and work. Generalized anxiety disorder symptoms include: Feeling restless, wound-up, or on-edge Being easily fatigued Having difficulty concentrating; mind going blank Being irritable Having muscle tension Difficulty controlling feelings of worry Having sleep problems, such as difficulty falling or staying asleep, restlessness, or unsatisfying sleep You can read more about the condition here. Neuropsychology While most psychologists and psychiatrists can help stroke survivors and others with depression and other conditions, there is a specialty that may be even more helpful -- neuropsychology. A while back, I talked with Dr. Karen Sullivan from I Care For Your Brain. She wrote the "Interactive Stroke Recovery Guide."*  You can listen to that conversation or learn more at http://Strokecast.com/Karen A neuropsychologist has additional, specialized training to work specifically with folks who have brain injuries. They dive deep into the details of the injury to provide the best customized treatment plan, leveraging expertise that generalists don't have. They work with folks with a wide array of functionality and challenges. FLAME vs FOCUS As long as we are talking about depression, we should also talk about antidepressants a little -- specifically SSRIs and how the relate to stroke. In 2011, the FLAME study was published in the Lancet. In short, it demonstrated that stroke survivors who took Prozac (Fluoxetine) experienced stronger motor recovery. Many hospitals saw those results and began putting more stroke survivors on Prozac because, well, why not? If the patient tolerates it well, and it can help folks work better, it's probably a good idea. And if it reduces or prevent post stroke depression (or other depression) that's a solid win. I talked with Dr. Nirav Shah about this back in November of 2018. You can listen to that episode here. That's how I started on an SSRI in my stay. They originally tried Prozac with me, but I had a not great reaction to it. It apparently gave me an anxiety attack. So we quickly stopped that (thank you, Xanax, I think). We talked about it some more and tried again with a different SSRI -- Lexapro (Escitalopram) because I had tolerated it well during a tough time some years earlier. Cheap, no negative side effects, and potentially helpful is win. A month after my interview with Nirav, and a year and a half after my stroke, the FOCUS study came out, attempting to duplicate the results of the FLAME study on a bigger scale. It failed. The scientific consensus now is that SSRIs do not help with motor recovery. They do still help with depression. The hospital no longer recommends SSRIs as part of the motor recovery protocol. So what does that mean for folks like me? I asked my doctor last year if that meant I should stop taking them. We talked about it and she explained I could certainly stop if I wanted to. "But, dude -- it's 2020." And she had a valid point. (Okay, maybe I paraphrased that) And that's why Escitalopram still has a place in my pill organizer. As always, everyone's stroke and circumstances will vary, so talk to your doctor before making any changes to your medication. Hack of the Week Get a dog. A dog can be helpful after stroke, whether it's a service dog or simply a companion animal. When you have a dog, you have a responsibility to take care of it. You have to feed it, walk it, groom it, and give it cuddles. Sometimes that may be reason enough to get out of bed and get moving for the day. Links Where do we go from here? If you think there's a chance you might be experiencing depression, talk to your medical team Share this episode with someone you know with the link http://Strokecast.com/depression Subscribe to the free, monthly Strokecast email newsletter at http://Strokecast.com/news Don't get best…get better.

Love, Marriage and Reality TV
Married at First Sight Season 13 Episode 2

Love, Marriage and Reality TV

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 60:03


Mykaela and Zack have their wedding day, and they're both very happy with what they see at the altar. Johnny and Bao have their traditional tea ceremony and their first dance. Myrla continues to reveal her horrible personality while shopping for her wedding dress and getting ready for her wedding day. Pool Gil - he's too good for the hot mess coming his way. Jose gets the tackiest tuxedo known to man. Ryan continues to act like he's on Xanax 24/7, while Brett is hopeful for their marriage.

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.
Episode #219 - "If I'm Looking for God, I've Found God"

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 20:14


When I was in early sobriety someone said, "God says, don't be afraid. If you know to look for Me, you've already found Me." Here, I talk about this. 

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.
Episode #218 - "A Step Three Check-In"

Recovery Radio Podcast - KMP3 - Long-Term Sobriety in A.A.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 18:22


In this episode I talk about some simple ways I can tell I need to remind myself I'm no longer running the show.- Which side of the counter am I on?- God is our employer- Everyone a potential customerWebsite here.Instagram here.

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
251: Ask Matt, Rhonda, and David (with Dr. Rutherford Knows)

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 31:23


#251, Ask Matt, Rhonda, and David (with the famed Dr. Rutherford Knows) Today we are again joined by the fantastic Dr. Matthew May for an Ask David. Rhonda and I are thrilled that Matt will be joining us every month. His input will give you a broader range of insights and answers to your many excellent questions! Today's questions were submitted by the more than 6,000 people who registered for my free talk on July 8, 2021 on the Rapid Treatment of Anxiety Disorders which was sponsored by PESI. I was very grateful to PESI for organizing this event, since it was open to shrinks as well as the general public, and that is the same audience that Rhonda and I are trying to reach with our Feeling Good Podcast. By the way, thank you for your ongoing support of the Feeling Good podcasts. Our four millionth download should happen in August! Please keep telling friends about the podcast if you think they might be interested. The very shy but erudite Dr. Knows may again join us and make an occasional comment. Let us know if you like his input and want to hear more from him in future podcasts. If you don't like him, we can quietly sweep him to the sidelines. Here are the questions we'll answer today: Hello Dr Burns, excited to be here at your talk today. Could you tell us more about dependency on anti-anxiety medications (benzodiazepines like Valium, Librium Ativan, Xanax, and so forth) and how to inform the client about the dangers of addiction? If this treatment you describe for anxiety disorders is 'rapid' does it linger? Is this rapid response you describe in your treatment of anxiety disorders merely first-aid? Am I right in assuming that the sustained work of psychodynamic therapy, body work, and so forth will still be required? Can you discuss any published or ongoing empirical research on the efficacy of TEAM-CBT compared to other therapy techniques? How does Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), developed in New York by the late Dr. Albert Ellis in the 1950s, fit into the picture? How does the cognitive distortion, Fortune Telling, apply to specific phobias? Rhonda, Matt, Rutherford, and I thank you for joining us today, and hope you enjoyed the dialogue! Rhonda, Matt, and David (plus Rutherford)

Are You My Podcast?
Sex/Life (Netflix)

Are You My Podcast?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 73:27


This week, Sarah and Mary recap the Netflix series, “Sex/Life.” This episode is especially NSFW, so keep that in mind and use earbuds like the classy people that you are. Sarah is less than thrilled with Billie's poor decisions and weak character, however, like most, is appropriately thrilled with the shower scene in episode three. Mary needs a private room and a Xanax to get through this series but she wouldn't have it any other way. Lots of laughs - give it a listen wherever you get your podcasts.Mary needs a private room and a Xanax to get through this series but she wouldn't have it any other way. Lots of laughs - give it a listen wherever you get your podcasts.Subscribe, follow, like, and review wherever you get your podcasts.Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and join us on Patreon. sarahcolonna.com  maryradzinski.com   © 2020-2021 Are You My Podcast?

Let The Hate Flow Through You With Jeremy Sheer and El Jordano Diablo

Comedian Vaughn Wesley joins the Fat Woke Boyz to discuss his hatred of Mumble Rap.  Vaughn has a very specific reason behind his hatred, and from there the conversation flows from one place to another like a beautiful benzo trip.  Find out what Vaughn really enjoys with his audio adventures plus Sheer says some swears.  Recorded and produced by Paul Wolfe. #Cleveland #Youngstown #Warren #Trap #Metal #Punk #Unitarian #Rap #Xanax #Benzodiazepenes

Report This Post
146f - Real Housewives

Report This Post

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 32:01


Grab a Xanax and a pitcher of wine and enjoy some posts inspired by the worst franchise in television history! Thanks to JAMIE for selecting this topic! Head over to PATREON.COM/REPORTTHISPOST for more

Banshees and Booze
Ep 131 - Fauci 2.5

Banshees and Booze

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 59:02


The world is starting to get back to normal, so what do we do? Try to ruin it for everyone! Pop a Xanax or slam some mini bottles, because this week we're talking about HAUNTED AIRPLANES! Tami gives Amie so many chills that they come back to her by telling the tale of the ghosts of Flight 401. And Amie goes straight to the source with some terrifying tales of first-person ghost encounters on planes. Fresh-baked socks, anyone? . We're Social!: www.bansheesandbooze.com www.instagram.com/bansheesandbooze www.twitter.com/bansheesnbooze . Theme Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ . Artwork: Laura de Mooij www.instagram.com/disneybabydoll/

Conversations
Wakefield's Kristen Dunphy — turning pain into gold

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 47:24


The screenwriter and showrunner on writing television drama, her struggles with mental health, and how her time in psychiatric hospitals inspired the acclaimed ABC TV drama series Wakefield (CW: drug references and suicidal ideation. Please use discretion when listening)

Doc Talks With Dr. Brian Sheppard

Lexi, originally from Northeast Arkansas, lived a seeming normal life with a mom who had an undiagnosed mental health condition which led to a lot of anxiety. Once in college she began to use Xanax and Adderall. She was arrested and kicked out of school after a suicide attempt. She now works as a phase 2 director in a woman's addition support home.    We talk with Lexi again about the struggles of sobriety, rebuilding trust with his family, and how to recognize warning signs that someone you know may be addicted.   You can find Lexi at:  IG: lexilamey FB: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100016532790835 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClOwOTfQLLdbR_t6cVJ3Oow   Resources:  The Harbor Home -  www.theharborhome.com National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 800-273-8255 SAMHSA's National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) You can find Doc Brian at:   Twitter: talksdoc TikTok: doctalkswithdocb https://www.facebook.com/doctalkswithdocb https://www.instagram.com/doctalkswithdocb/ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/doc-talks-with-dr-brian-sheppard/id1536345675 https://open.spotify.com/show/1qSaIZ2lsOKDtL4ueox7FY https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6prIruH_Izrrx-0MWqJm9w/ https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=586625&refid=stpr https://www.deezer.com/show/1941482  

Doc Talks With Dr. Brian Sheppard
From Arrest to Redemption with Lexi Lami

Doc Talks With Dr. Brian Sheppard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 55:02


Lexi, originally from Northeast Arkansas, lived a seeming normal life with a mom who had an undiagnosed mental health condition which led to a lot of anxiety. Once in college she began to use Xanax and Adderall. She was arrested and kicked out of school after a suicide attempt. She now works as a phase 2 director in a woman's addition support home.    Don't miss this story of grace and compassion that carried her to where she is today!    You can find Lexi at:  IG: lexilamey FB: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100016532790835 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClOwOTfQLLdbR_t6cVJ3Oow   Resources:  Harbor Home: www.theharborhome.com National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 800-273-8255 SAMHSA's National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) You can find Doc Brian at:   Twitter: talksdoc TikTok: doctalkswithdocb https://www.facebook.com/doctalkswithdocb https://www.instagram.com/doctalkswithdocb/ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/doc-talks-with-dr-brian-sheppard/id1536345675 https://open.spotify.com/show/1qSaIZ2lsOKDtL4ueox7FY https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6prIruH_Izrrx-0MWqJm9w/ https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=586625&refid=stpr https://www.deezer.com/show/1941482    

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
Michelin-starred chef Josiah Citrin on losing his son to a drug overdose

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 50:03


Josiah Citrin, the Michelin-starred force behind Mélisse and Citrin in Santa Monica, lost his 23-year-old son Augie to an opioid overdose in December. Citrin is speaking out about the tragedy to hopefully prevent other parents from experiencing the same kind of heartbreak. “You don't worry about a Vicodin or a Xanax. Obviously, we worry about our kids being addicted to it and having a problem, you know, substance abuse. But I don't think it was ever like oh, it can actually kill you,” Citrin says. “We need to talk to our kids about this. And really let them know how dangerous that is out there. And don't think it's not gonna happen to my kid.”

The Life Stylist
SOLOCAST: Natural Pain Relief, Structured Water, Non-Toxic Cookware, Top Brain Function Hacks & More #349

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 85:59


I drop my 25 years’ worth of biohacking tools, lifestyle hacks, and products in this bonus episode, where I take another dive into your questions from The Life Stylist Podcast Facebook Group.  Plug in to find the answers to where you can source low-EMF light bulbs, get natural pain relief, drink deuterium-depleted and structured water, prepare food with non-toxic cookware, and optimize your brain function.    05:40 —Debbie asks: where can I purchase quality non-LED light bulbs?  The issues with flicker and color temperature in commercial light bulbs. Incandescent is a solution if they’re under 100 watts (otherwise, there can be stress-inducing flickers). Waveform Lighting offer full spectrum bulbs. BLUblox Lumi Sleep+ bulbs are great for slipping into a relaxed mood at night Wear blue-light-blocking glasses when the sun goes down. BLUblox, Ra Optics have some fashion-forward options    10:58 —Jonathan asks: what are your best natural remedies for symptomatic pain relief? Start with your diet! Remove inflammatory foods such as grains, lectins, and sugar. Take ice baths every day. I just had my Morozko Forge installed, which is fantastic because you can set the temperature, the water is self-cleaned with O-zone, and it has zero EMF. Use code “LUKE150” to receive a $150 discount on Cold Forge and Filtered Forge models and code “LUKE500” to receive a $500 discount for the Prism Forge model. Neurocranial restructuring Dr. Dean Howell. Check out episode #345: “It's All In Your Head: Neurocranial Restructuring for Migraines & Pain.” Laser therapy with Power Medic Lasers. Check out episode #110: “Ending Injuries, Pain, and Infertility with Cold Lasers w/ Arne Grinsted.” Target vibration therapy post-workout with the Hypervolt. Network spinal analysis created by past guest Donnie Epstein. Check out episode #138: “EpiEnergetics: The Miraculous Healing Powers of Donny Epstein” Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) is the best system to help joints regain motion so that you can move freely. In Austin, I go to Alive + Well in Bee Cave  I recently found a practitioner for The Feldenkrais Method, here in Austin. Michelle Drerup is incredible: michelledrerup.com. I used to find acupuncture beneficial for pain and moved onto electro-acupuncture, combining ancient Eastern and Western medicine. For those in LA, head to Dr. Roy Page. I’m a huge fan of chiropractic healing and used to go to Dr. Har Hari at the Transformational Center in LA.  Pulse centers are all over the US, and their PEMF is excellent for soothing injuries and improving joint mobility. Check out episode #212: “PEMF Power! Speed Healing Pain & Injuries with Pulse Centers (Special Report).” I’ve dabbled with the Egoscue method, where practitioners train you to do specific exercises at home. Self-discipline is required! Nu-Fit is great. I just checked out their HQ, here in Austin, TX, with Alyson. TRT SoftWave Therapy. If you’re in Sarasota, Fl. Dr. John Lieurance is the guy to go to.  For supplements, the best thing is Kratom from superspeciosa.com and super clean. I just take 2-3 capsules if I’m in pain. It’s potentially addictive (although I’ve never found it to be the case). I always suggest that everyone examine their emotional pain before turning to an escape and using something like Kratom frequently.  Kava is a great natural alternative to Benzodiazepines, Xanax, and Valium, with no addiction risk. TRU KAVA is the only kava I touch. Go to: gettrukava.com. Enter “LUKE15” at checkout for 15% off. Check out episode #219: “Kava Culture: Nature’s Xanax and Your Nervous System Solutions w/ Cameron George.” I’ve just tried out the Feel Free Kratom/kava blend. It’s super strong, so sample ¼ to see how it works with your body chemistry.    39:17 —Megan: Is there a way to make deuterium-depleted water at home? I’ve done a lot of research on this and have interviewed many world experts, and I don’t believe you can make it at home.  Dry fasting and Keto can help your body deplete deuterium levels over time.  The best way to decrease deuterium is with drinking water like Litewater. A monthly subscription is $300 but it’s worth it.  Live Spring Water in LA, if you’re out there. Check out episodes:  #165: “Deuterium Depletion: The Most Powerful Health Hack You've Never Heard Of w/ Dr-Que Collins Dr. Laszlo Boros” #166: “Deuterium Depletion Revisited: The Missing Link w/ Dr. Anne Cooper” #340: “Unlocking the Mysteries of Quantum Technologies & EMF Protection”   46:46 — Nicole: What are the best non-toxic cookware brands? Most retail is completely toxic - non-stick Teflon is the worst! Stainless steel is a marketing lie, with most made from aluminum and nickel - both of which are very toxic. I love the natural and organic feel of Xtrema ceramic cookware.  All glass kettle for boiling water. Coffee makers and electric tea kettles can leech metals and plastics.   52:15 —Justin: What is the easiest and most effective way to structure water at home? I place my water near Somavedic devices.  Water in the sun in a Miron glass water tastes amazing. Run your water through a Vitalizer Plus Vortexer. Exposing water to my Joovv red light is a next-level bio-hack I love.  You can install a GRANDER unit into your house after fitting a filtration system to restructure your water from the mains into your house. I’m excited to install this in my home.   1:02:17—Narive: Any bio-hacks for improving executive function, multitasking, and processing speed?   Find what is stressing your brain function. Test for heavy metals and mitigate EMF in your home.  Encourage your brain to produce brainwaves on demand with neurofeedback. I went to Biocybernaut Institute in Sedona and Peak Brain Institute in LA. NuCalm meditations.  Check out episode #318: “The Neuroscience of Stress: How to Meditate Like a Monk in Minutes w/ Nucalm ft. Jim Poole” Breathwork and targeted prayer for cognition. Vedic meditation.  Kundalini yoga. Microdosing (LSD and psilocybin) to help you multitask. Plant medicine ceremonies like ayahuasca and 5-meo-dmt. Check out: Episode 326: “5-MeO-DMT Integration Session: Bufo Alvarius Toad Medicine w/ Aubrey Marcus”Episode 202 and 203: “Welcome to the Jungle: My Ayahuasca Journey at Rythmia”: parts I and II. Qualia Mind Essentials. Qualia Life.  Blue Cannatine with methylene blue, nicotine, CBD, and caffeine.  Dusk and dawn sungazing (with precautions). AmpCoil Tesla-based PEMF delivery system with PEMF frequency technology. Molecular hydrogen inhalation by Vital Reaction.  Hydrogen tabs by Water & Wellness.   The Ultimate Hydration & Recovery Drink. NanoVi Cellular Repair Technology to bring down inflammation. Ice baths and cryotherapy. Exercise. Infrared saunas. I have one by Clearlight.  Bulletproof coffee or mold-free coffee that you mix with a healthy fat. Take a magnesium supplement. I like Magnesium Breakthrough.   Stick to a keto diet and/or take exogenous ketone esters. I use Perfect Keto. Use the code “THELIFESTYLIST20” for 20% off.  Small amounts of nicotine gum or lozenges from Lucy. It’s addictive, so be cautious!  Try inversion therapy (e.g.: headstands, gravity boots).  Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been my most powerful tool. I invested in The Vitaeris 320 by Oxyhealth. Bowel cleansing with gravity-fed colonics or Oxy-Powder.  Good sleep! Do everything you can. Track your sleep with a health tech device. Use the OOLER sleep system or chiliBLANKET to regulate body temperature and save money when running the AC.   More about this episode.   JOIN MY NEW ONLINE EMF HOME SAFETY MASTERCLASS! Visit online.lukestorey.com/emf-class to join. Only $149! Are you aware of the dangers of EMF exposure in your home but have no idea where to start when it comes to finding and fixing them?  Are you concerned about your exposure to the current 3G, 4G, and 5G wireless networks now activated in most major cities? Have you attempted to test the levels yourself using EMF meters you found online and ended up confused and frustrated? EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) are one of the most toxic elements in our living and work environments. Due to the technical nature of accurately testing for them—and the training required to do so properly—many of us resign ourselves to the fact that we just have to accept them and the consequences they bring in order to use the modern technology we depend on. But you don’t have to. In this seven-part video documentary series, you will follow world-renowned building biologist Brian Hoyer as he tests an entire home, room by room, to determine the source and level of every known type of EMF. By the end of this series, you will not only be thoroughly educated on the various types and sources of EMF commonly found in homes but also of the many mitigation tools and techniques available thanks to the cutting-edge technologies. Visit online.lukestorey.com/emf-class to join. Only $149!   Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events - things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient: magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you’re going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off at www.bioptimizers.com/luke, and you’ll even find up to 40% off select packages of Magnesium Breakthrough. AND...   BLUBLOX. Blue light hitting your skin at night can disrupt your sleep and circadian rhythms. The flicker and EMF from regular light bulbs or other red LED bulbs may damage your health according to some studies. BLUblox has designed the ultimate zero flicker, zero blue, and green light bulb for after sunset use. You can get all of this epicness and more by using the code “LIFESTYLIST” for 15% off at BLUblox.com/lifestylist. AND…   ORGANIFI RED. When that 2:30 feeling rolls around, just drop a scoop of Organifi Red in some cold water, stir it with a spoon, and enjoy the antioxidant benefits. Healthier than coffee and no crash! Recharge your mind and body with a delicious superfood berry blend of premium, organic superfoods that contain potent adaptogens, antioxidants and a clinical dose of cordyceps, with zero caffeine and only two grams of sugar. Go to organifi.com/lifestylist and use code “lifestylist” for 20% off any item in the store.  HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You’ll really love Luke’s Master Market Online Store!  It’s a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke’s hand-picked biohacking and health products, all in one place. Get exclusive discounts and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals

Savage Lovecast
Savage Love Episode 756

Savage Lovecast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 51:11


When your baby has a peanut allergy and your in-laws don't take it seriously, well, the sparks are gonna fly. The eternal question: can you make your penis bigger? Dan's answer may not shock you. ON the Magnum version, Dr. Shanna Swan author of "Countdown" is on to talk about declining sperm counts, environmental toxins and the fate of the human race. Pop yourself Xanax before listening. And, hear two separate tales of women looking to hire unicorns for one special evening. 206-302-2064 voicemail@savagelovecast.com This episode of the Savage Lovecast is sponsored by : a website dedicated to getting scientific truths out about women's sexual pleasure. Savage Lovecast listeners can get a discount if they go to OMGYES.com/Savage. Thanks to Roman for supporting Savage Lovecast. Roman is a men’s health company that offers remote online diagnosis for ED and convenient monthly delivery of medication. Visit . If approved, you’ll get fifteen dollars off your first order of ED treatment. This episode is brought to you by Talkspace- online therapy that makes it easy to get extra mental health support. For $100 off your first month, go to and use the offer code Savage.

The Life Stylist
The Kava Connection: Nature's Answer to Anxiety & Mood Management w/ Cameron George #341

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 160:56


Kava is unlike many of the plant medicines I’ve spoken about previously. A) it’s legal, and B) it doesn’t quite send you into another stratosphere of consciousness like Ayahuasca or 5-MeO-DMT. Instead, it’s a subtle, softer, slow burner that can be easily incorporated into your daily routine, like your regular cup of joe you brew in the morning. It manages your mood, health and, as I learned today, neutralizes trauma in the body and environment.  Joining me to tell you more is Cameron George, passionate Kava educator and founder of TRU KAVA, the purest, potent, and sustainable Kava supplement I’ve ever tasted.  Enjoy 20% off your first order by heading to gettrukava.com and using the discount code ¨LUKE20.”   12:39 — What Led Cameron to Kava His pain-to-purpose journey Addiction to Adderall  Financial and emotional breakdown  Micro breakthroughs from plant medicine  Transitioning from Benzodiazepine to Kava 43:45 — The Origins of Kava   Where Kava is cultivated Examining plant intelligence Why Kava is not addictive Nootropic effects of Kava    1:15:24 — What Role Kava Can Play in the World Integrating Kava into modern culture Kava as a gateway tool for physic integration  Why you can’t trust the quality or potency of product in a local Kava bar How Western filtration methods butcher Kava’s natural effects Redefining the market for Kava The multiple benefits of Kava  1:52:25 —Kava and EMF Protection Kava as a sodium and calcium channel blocker EMF sensitivity and Kava consumption 1:59:14— Debunking the Kava and Liver Toxicity Myth How pharmaceutical companies tried to imitate nature – and failed miserably  Regulation risks 2:14:46 —Cameron’s Kava Vision  Creating a palatable and effective Kava product Revamping Kava bars and integrating Kava into a modern framework Tru Kava oil    More about this episode. Watch it on YouTube.   JOIN MY NEW ONLINE EMF HOME SAFETY MASTERCLASS! Visit lukestorey.com/emfmasterclass to join. Only $149! Are you aware of the dangers of EMF exposure in your home, but have no idea where to start when it comes to finding, and fixing them?  Are you concerned about your exposure to the current 3G, 4G, and 5G wireless networks now activated in most major cities? Have you attempted to test the levels yourself using EMF meters you found online and ended up confused and frustrated? EMFs (electromagnetic frequencies) are one of the most toxic elements in our living and work environments. Due to the technical nature of accurately testing for them—and the training required to do so properly—many of us resign ourselves to the fact that we just have to accept them and the consequences they bring in order to use the modern technology we depend on. But you don’t have to. In this seven-part video documentary series, you will follow world-renowned building biologist Brian Hoyer as he tests an entire home, room by room, to determine the source and level of every known type of EMF. By the end of this series, you will not only be thoroughly educated on the various types and sources of EMF commonly found in homes but also of the many mitigation tools and techniques available thanks to the cutting-edge technologies. Visit lukestorey.com/emfmasterclass to join. Only $149!   Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey   THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: MAGNESIUM BREAKTHROUGH. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. When most people think of stress, they think of their job, traffic, tense relationships, current events, things like that. But the root of so much of the stress we experience comes down to a deficiency in one overlooked nutrient — magnesium. So, if you're ready to help your body deal with stress, instead of putting a band-aid on it after the fact, you’re going to want some Magnesium Breakthrough. You can use the code “luke10” for 10% off at magbreakthrough.com/luke, and you’ll even find up to 40% off select packages of Magnesium Breakthrough. AND... TRU KAVA. Kava is nature’s most powerful anxiety reliever that has also been shown to boost mood, mental clarity, and deep sleep by naturally restoring GABA levels in the brain over time. However, due to contamination with toxic plant parts and low-quality extraction processes, most kava products currently on the market contain little to none of these benefits. TRU KAVA products are 3rd party lab tested for quality and safety and are made using proprietary solvent-free extraction methods that capture the full traditional kava experience, packaged in tasty ready to use forms. TRU KAVA is available in both a pristine oil form called KAVAPLEX and in the brand new ELEVATE Kava Shots. Enjoy 20% off your first order by heading to gettrukava.com and using the discount code ¨LUKE20.” AND… ATHLETIC GREENS. A lot of wellness trends have come and gone over the last two decades, but there’s one trend that has continued to grow exponentially: juicing. However, juicing at home can be very laborious, and buying juices at the local juice place can be very expensive. So I was stoked when I discovered this company called Athletic Greens, who make an incredible green juice powder that contains 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole food-sourced ingredients that work together to fill the nutritional gap in your diet, increase energy and focus, aid with digestion, and support a healthy immune system without the need to take multiple products or synthetic products.  So, if you're ready to get down with some Athletic Greens, they are offering my audience a free one-year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs. Just go to athleticgreens.com/lifestylist to get your FREE year supply of Vitamin D and 5 free travel packs with your first purchase. HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the Show? You’ll really love Luke’s Master Market Online Store!  It’s a win/win! Get direct links to all of Luke’s hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, get exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals Resources Website: gettrukava.com Instagram: @trukava Related Shows Episode #219: Kava Culture: Nature's Xanax and Your Nervous System Solution w/ Cameron George

DISGRACELAND
Lil’ Peep (Mini Episode): A new hip-hop and emo fusion; trap beats, tender lyrics, too much Xanax and an overdose that’s still mysterious.

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 2:20


Lil’ Peep was a once-in-a-generation talent. Poised to become a new Cobain, Bowie or Dylan, but whose life was cut short by an overdose that’s still mysterious. Depression, anxiety and a unique fusion of hip-hop, emo, grime and raw, empathetic lyrics resulted in a deep connection to fans that in the end, may have done him in at the tender age of 21. This is a mini episode of Disgraceland. To listen to the full episode as well as all archived episodes of Disgraceland, episodes on The Rolling Stones, Cardi B. Ozzy Osbourne, Prince and others follow @disgracelandpod on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.