Podcasts about Radio shack

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Radio shack

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Best podcasts about Radio shack

Latest podcast episodes about Radio shack

Cashing in with T.J. Miller

Host Cash Levy sets a trap in the woods, desperate to catch a guest for his podcast. He manages to snag none other than comedian T.J. Miller (Yogi Bear 3D, former Radioshack employee) for a discussion about ex-girlfriends, bad coffee, and real Italian pizza, like the kind made in the leaning tower. Watch T.J.'s latest stand-up special, Dear Jonah, free on youtube. T.J.'s Upcoming Live Shows Nov 3-5 | Appleton, WI @ Skyline Comedy Club | Tickets Nov 10-12 | Jacksonville, FL @ Comedy Zone Jacksonville | Tickets Nov 13 | Mobile, AL @ Alabama Music Box | Tickets Cash and T.J. Together Nov 18-20 | San Jose, CA @ San Jose Improv | Tickets ------ 12.5 Fan Promo Spots by... Musician James Cursio, Tomorrow's Forgotten Relics EP VpinHub, Virtual Pinball Community Luc1f3rB0b on Twitch @ twitch.tv/luc1f3rb0b ------ Advertisers contact: info@cashinginwithtjmiller.com ------ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

V Interesting with V Spehar
Meet V by the Fountain

V Interesting with V Spehar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 52:05


What are some nostalgic things you remember doing at the mall? For V, it was working their first job at Bath and Body Works, buying CDs from Radio Shack, and watching people take glamour shots at JCPenney. The mall was once poppin', and it used to be the hottest place to build. What happened? Architecture critic and author Alexandra Lange joins V to talk about the inside history of the mall, from the design features that make malls an iconic American institution to when their popularity began to drop off. Plus, where the “dead mall” narrative came from and why repurposing them could help communities like the unhoused.  Follow Alexandra at @langealexandra on Twitter and Instagram. Keep up with V on TikTok at @underthedesknews and on Twitter at @VitusSpehar. And stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows go to lemonadamedia.com/sponsors.Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our True Crime Podcast
187. The Stranger in my Home: Carolina Killer

Our True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 39:03


It is December 23, 1999, in Easley, South Carolina, located right outside Greenville. People were getting ready to celebrate the holidays by cooking, cleaning, and wrapping goodies for loved ones. One of those getting ready to welcome family for a celebration was 87-year-old Martha Browning. Martha was always a hard worker and started working at the local mill at 12 years old. Like most grandmothers, Martha loved her family and fed them until they burst. As Martha was prepping for company, her 34-year-old granddaughter Deanna Tinsley came to town a bit early to help her out, and others would be arriving throughout the day. Her home was a place of love and welcomed anyone that wanted to come by. As the two of them were taking a moment to relax before the hustle began again, a man walked into the home and sat down in a chair. The beginning of a real-life nightmare is about to start for these two ladies, but little did they know this was the last stop for a man responsible for the unthinkable. Join Jen and Cam on “Our True Crime Podcast' as we discuss “The Stranger in my Home:Carolina Killer” LD by the fantastic Edward October from @octoberpodVHS All music is by our EP Nico @wetalkofdream Sources:https://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/2019/12/23/20-years-ago-dallen-bounds-killed-4-greenville-sc-victims-then-shot-himself/2673293001/https://murderpedia.org/male.B/b/bounds-dallen.htmhttps://dbpedia.org/page/Dallen_Boundshttps://skdb.fandom.com/wiki/BOUNDS_Dallen_Forresthttps://horrorhistory.net/2019/12/23/man-kills-ex-girlfriend-her-ex-husband-then-self/https://thecinemaholic.com/how-did-dallen-bounds-die-where-is-casandra-laster-now/https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q4502292https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/60525/?name=Dallen_Bounds&pcat=bmd_death&qh=00efb62f88105f3e8178f4774f82d546https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B091HLPNCD/ref=atv_hm_hom_1_c_lZOsi7_2_4

MUSIC REACTIONS AND COMMENTS
13-Year-Old Girl Finds Porn On New Cell Phone | A mother and her 13-year-old daughter got more than they bargained for when they activated their new RadioShack cell phones in June 2011,

MUSIC REACTIONS AND COMMENTS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 1:59


13-Year-Old Girl Finds Porn On New Cell Phone | A mother and her 13-year-old daughter got more than they bargained for when they activated their new RadioShack cell phones in June 2011, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Marcia Jones alleges in a civil lawsuit against Sprint and RadioShack that after she and her daughter Morgan returned home from purchasing what they believed to be new Sprint HTC Evo 4G cell phones at Stonecrest Mall in Lithonia, Ga., Morgan discovered adult and child pornography uploaded by a previous user on her device. Morgan required counseling after viewing the graphic media, the New York Daily News reports. “ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/you-betterknow4/message

MUSIC REACTIONS AND COMMENTS
13-Year-Old Girl Finds Porn On New Cell Phone | A mother and her 13-year-old daughter got more than they bargained for when they activated their new RadioShack cell phones in June 2011,

MUSIC REACTIONS AND COMMENTS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 1:59


13-Year-Old Girl Finds Porn On New Cell Phone | A mother and her 13-year-old daughter got more than they bargained for when they activated their new RadioShack cell phones in June 2011, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. Marcia Jones alleges in a civil lawsuit against Sprint and RadioShack that after she and her daughter Morgan returned home from purchasing what they believed to be new Sprint HTC Evo 4G cell phones at Stonecrest Mall in Lithonia, Ga., Morgan discovered adult and child pornography uploaded by a previous user on her device. Morgan required counseling after viewing the graphic media, the New York Daily News reports. “ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/you-betterknow4/message

RUN GPG Podcast
Tai Lopez - “Entrepreneurship, Philosophy, & Living The Good Life”

RUN GPG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 56:17


Tai Lopez is an entrepreneur, investor, keynote speaker, online personality, and advisor to over 20 multi-million dollar businesses.  Tai has also acquired major brands and companies such as Pier 1, Radio Shack, and many more.  With more than 400 employees and 7 global offices, Tai believes that knowledge allows for more opportunities in creativity and economic freedom to achieve success, happiness, and a better life.  He's also one of the most prolific and controversial personalities on social media with millions of followers across numerous platforms and is known as a master marketer who has created some of the most successful ads in the history of YouTube.  We talked about all that including the following topics:   Great Ideas & Creativity  Who Is Tai Lopez? Controversial & Compelling Being ‘Authentic' On Social Media Joe Biden vs. Donald Trump's Twitter Elon Musk & Hot Dog Lines Hard Advice On Mentorship From My Grandfather  Top 3 Book Recommendations The Key To Going ‘Viral'  How Instagram & Tik Tok Use ‘Hypnosis'  Mental Illness, Narcissism, & Social Media The Single Most Important Lesson An Entrepreneur Needs To Learn  The Real Solution To Mankind's Problems Finding Your Unified Guiding Light? The Zeitgeist Of Modern Social Media Too Many Shoe Shine Boys Giving Advice About Crypto Why Bitcoin Maximalists Are Pseudo-Intellectuals Where Is The Real Estate Market Headed? Tai's ‘Dinner Guests' Tai's Fantasy ‘Board Of Directors'   Every week, the RUN GPG Podcast aims to provide inspirational stories from people who made a mark in entrepreneurship, entertainment, personal development, and the real estate industry. It is produced by the GREATER PROPERTY GROUP to help the audience grow and scale their business and their life. Know more about GREATER PROPERTY GROUP and the RUN GPG Podcast by going to www.rungpg.com or by getting in touch with us here: info@greaterpropertygroup.com.     Contact Tai Lopez: Website: https://www.tailopez.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tailopez Twitter: https://twitter.com/tailopez Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TaiLopezOfficial   Contact David Morrell: TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@morrellionaire Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegreaterdavid/ Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/fearofdavid     Subscribe & Review The RUN GPG Podcast Thanks for tuning in to this week's episode of the RUN GPG Podcast! Please leave us a review on iTunes. This will help us continue delivering beneficial content for you and our listeners each week!

Intego Mac Podcast
Episode 259: The Dangers of Expired Domains and Old Email Addresses

Intego Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 28:08


When domain names expire, anyone can take them over, and not only confuse people used to a company name, but also access any emails sent to that domain. Show Notes: Expired Domain Dumpster Diving Have I Been Pwned Plain Text Offenders Reused domain: Kagi.com Zombie brand RadioShack is launching a crypto market for ‘the older generation' gail.com Intego Mac Premium Bundle X9 is the ultimate protection and utility suite for your Mac. Download a free trial now at intego.com, and use this link for a special discount when you're ready to buy.

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Magnavox Odyssey goes on sale VCS games grow up Atari's 5200 bets on classics These stories and many more on this episode of the VGNRTM This episode we will look back at the biggest stories in and around the video game industry in September 1982. As always, we'll mostly be using magazine cover dates, and those are of course always a bit behind the actual events. Ethan from the The History of How We Play is our cohost. You can find his other fine retrogaming work here: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ or https://twitter.com/GameResearch_E Get us on your mobile device: Android: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly92aWRlb2dhbWVuZXdzcm9vbXRpbWVtYWNoaW5lLmxpYnN5bi5jb20vcnNz iOS: https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/video-game-newsroom-time-machine And if you like what we are doing here at the podcast, don't forget to like us on your podcasting app of choice, YouTube, and/or support us on patreon! https://www.patreon.com/VGNRTM Send comments on twitter @videogamenewsr2 Or Instagram https://www.instagram.com/vgnrtm Or videogamenewsroomtimemachine@gmail.com Links: 7 Minutes in Heaven: Cytron Masters Video Version: https://www.patreon.com/posts/72623378 https://www.mobygames.com/game/cytron-masters https://www.mobygames.com/developer/sheet/view/developerId,8515/ Joel Billings - SSI - https://www.patreon.com/posts/36827469 Corrections: August 1982 Ep - https://www.patreon.com/posts/july-1982-70742832 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari_2600_hardware https://www.bhamwiki.com/w/Aladdin%27s_Castle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E.T._the_Extra-Terrestrial_(video_game) https://www.mobygames.com/game/atari-2600/communist-mutants-from-space https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari_ST https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GEM_(desktop_environment) Leonard Tramiel - Part 2 - Atari - https://www.patreon.com/posts/71643153 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framebuffer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_nut#CornNuts Mitsubishi Luma Video Phone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJgBhesWdfg https://www.technologizer.com/2012/02/12/atari-oddities/9/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Kaplan 1972 Magnavox goes on sale https://www.newspapers.com/clip/94004237/magnavox-odyssey-showing-at-car/ Magnavox's Odyssey 50th Anniversary Special - https://www.patreon.com/posts/72485867 Time Out incorporates https://www.newspapers.com/clip/73836916/time-out-family-amusement-center/ https://arcadeblogger.com/2017/08/18/time-out-arcade-amazing-classic-arcade-pictures/ https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/2021/11/29/why-computer-space-was-a-success/ 1982 New penalties for copyright infringement signed into law Replay Septmeber 1982 pg. 9 Play Meter September 15, 1982 pg. 15 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGb7ZbEa0e8 https://www.amazon.de/-/en/Myron-Sugerman-ebook/dp/B0773ZWFTJ https://youtu.be/tvZgqYGEqR0 Restrictions, fee hikes, permits, and bans... Games People Pay September 4, 11, 18 Distributors aren't accepting trade ins Play Meter September 15, 1982 pg. 18, 10 https://ubm-twvideo01.s3.amazonaws.com/o1/vault/gdc04/slides/everything_you_need_to.pdf Atari Coin-Op cuts manpower https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n2/mode/1up Stern gets out of pinball Play Meter September 1982 pg. 29 https://www.mobygames.com/company/stern-electronics-inc https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stern_(game_company) RePlay adds conversion kits to their annual equipment guide Replay Septmeber 1982 pg. 3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game_conversion https://www.mobygames.com/game/arcade/mr-do Zaxxon ad goes national Play Meter September 1982 pg. 36 https://youtu.be/u3NUO2GFGAI Sega brings 3D to the arcade Replay September 1982 pg. 26 https://youtu.be/6Z6PJ6sOmXg https://www.mobygames.com/game/subroc-3-d https://www.mobygames.com/game/turbo Bushnell to return to game making Games People Pay September 18, 1982 pg. 1 https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n3/mode/1up Roger Hector - Atari, Disney, Sega, Namco, Sente - https://www.patreon.com/posts/72058794 https://www.mobygames.com/company/bally-sente-inc Pacman screen breaks https://archive.org/details/video-games-player-volume-1-number-1-fall-1982/page/n8/mode/1up https://pacman.fandom.com/wiki/Map_256_Glitch Midway sues Pacman guide book makers Replay September 1982 pg. 25 https://casetext.com/case/ty-inc-v-publications-international Games People Pay September 4, 1982 pg. 1 Pacman cartoon debuts Replay Septmeber 1982 pg. 20 https://youtu.be/t-Ex3Ce1KNU https://youtu.be/oNyXYPhnUIs https://youtu.be/Q84HUwBJPxk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pac-Land Coleco breaks quarterly earnings record Playthings September 1982 pg. 11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleco Colecovision gets nearly half a million orders Toy & Hobby World September 1982 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ColecoVision Atari bets on classics while Coleco taps into the arcades https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n3/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/atari-5200/1982/ https://www.mobygames.com/browse/games/colecovision/1982/ Atari announces 2600 emulator for 5200 https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n3/mode/1up https://web.archive.org/web/20170513013736/http://www.atarimuseum.com/videogames/consoles/5200/cx55.html Intellivision 2 announced https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n1/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellivision#Intellivision_II Mattel drops Intellivision Keyboard Toy & Hobby World September 1982 https://retroconsoles.fandom.com/wiki/Keyboard_Component Milton Bradley buys GCE Toy & Hobby World September 1982 https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n3/mode/1up Parker Brothers predicts $200 million in video game sales Toy & Hobby World September 1982 Tom Dusenberry - Parker Brothers - Hasbro - Atari - https://www.patreon.com/posts/42807419 Games by Apollo expands https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n1/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/company/apollo-inc https://gamehistory.org/wabbit/ https://www.mobygames.com/company/spectravideo-international-ltd Mattel ships defective carts https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/company/mattel-electronics Porn comes to the VCS Games People Pay September 4, pg. 2 https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n1/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/company/mystique https://www.mobygames.com/company/jhm-limited https://kotaku.com/porno-hustlers-of-the-atari-age-1847622176 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troma_Entertainment Horror comes to the VCS https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n1/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wizard_Video#History https://www.mobygames.com/company/wizard-video-games Advertising seen as key to video game sales Toy & Hobby World September 1982 Michael Katz Part Part 1 - Coleco - Epyx - Mattel - https://www.patreon.com/posts/35169258 Data Age gives away free audio record https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n2/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Huxley https://www.discogs.com/release/4773502-No-Artist-Mindscape https://www.mobygames.com/company/data-age-inc https://youtu.be/un-nOHXKGrk Bruce Davis named VP of Legal Affairs for Imagic https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n4/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Davis_(video_game_industry) Atari teams up with McDonald's https://archive.org/details/Atari_Coin_Connection_Volume_6_Number_7_September-October_1982/page/n1/mode/1up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qrsrn-fMHcw Palmtex gets Game & Watch rights Toy & Hobby World September 1982 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_%26_Watch TI rebate hits stocks Toys Hobbies and Crafts September 1982 pg. 14 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-99/4A Commodore cuts wholesale prices https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n3/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VIC-20 Leonard Tramiel - Part 1 - Commodore - https://www.patreon.com/posts/leonard-tramiel-69195513 Intel introduces the 286 https://archive.org/details/eu_BYTE-1982-09_OCR/page/n61/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_80286 MSDos is the new CPM https://archive.org/details/eu_BYTE-1982-09_OCR/page/n63/mode/1up https://archive.org/details/eu_BYTE-1982-09_OCR/page/n496/mode/1up https://books.google.de/books?id=BzAEAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=infoworld+sept+1982&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwitz4i9tKD6AhUL7aQKHQZXDNcQ6AF6BAgKEAI#v=onepage&q=infoworld%20sept%201982&f=false pg. 12 https://classictech.wordpress.com/2021/08/26/vector-graphic-vector-4-dual-processor-system/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_PC_compatible#Non-compatible_MS-DOS_computers:_Workalikes Tandy expands beyond Radio Shack https://archive.org/details/1982-09-compute-magazine/page/n7/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80_Color_Computer Atari teases new computer https://www.newspapers.com/clip/62343859/profile-on-atari/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari_8-bit_family https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari_8-bit_family#600XL_and_800XL Matushita introduces the 3 inch floppy https://archive.org/details/eu_BYTE-1982-09_OCR/page/n59/mode/1up https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floppy_disk_variants#compact_floppy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amstrad_CPC Creative Software buys Broderbund licenses https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n2/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/company/creative-software-inc https://www.mobygames.com/company/brderbund-software-inc https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epyx_Fast_Load IBM Charlie Chaplin ads appear https://archive.org/details/CreativeComputing1982-09/page/n25/mode/2up https://youtu.be/kQT_YCBb9ao The Games Network wants your games https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_2.5/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_2.5/page/n26/mode/1up http://tgn-inc.com/ First Star Software announced https://archive.org/details/1982-09-compute-magazine/page/n144/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/company/first-star-software-inc https://www.mobygames.com/game-group/boulder-dash-series On-Line Systems changes its name https://www.mobygames.com/company/sierra-entertainment-inc Gamestar announces solo Football https://archive.org/details/arcade_express_v1n4/page/n1/mode/1up https://www.patreon.com/posts/72097282 Brian Fargo releases the Demon's Forge https://archive.org/details/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_2.5/Computer_Gaming_World_Issue_2.5/page/n41/mode/1up https://www.mobygames.com/game/demons-forge https://www.mobygames.com/game/hunted-the-demons-forge Invisiclues premiere https://archive.org/details/softalkv3n01sep1982/page/91/mode/1up Michael Dornbrook Part 1 - Infocom - https://www.patreon.com/posts/44335732 Milton Bradley takes games analog Toy & Hobby World September 1982 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/4907/pac-man-game https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/6598/frogger https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/6731/donkey-kong Video game magazine boom hits Games People Pay September 4, pg. 5 https://archive.org/details/joystik_magazine https://archive.org/details/vidiotmagazine_202003/Vidiot%2001%20%28Sep-Oct%201982%29%20Premiere%20Collector%27s%20Issue/ https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22Videogaming+Illustrated%22 https://twitter.com/GameResearch_E/status/1551241458069504001 D&D movie in the works Toys Hobbie sand Crafts September 1982 https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0063953/?ref_=fn_al_nm_2 https://www.escapistmagazine.com/inside-the-lost-1980s-dungeons-dragons-movie-gary-gygax-loved/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeons_%26_Dragons_(film_series) ET merch anticipation is great Playthings September 1982 pg. 20 Toy & hobby World September 1982 https://www.ebay.de/itm/252701971251 https://www.mobygames.com/game/donkey-kong/cover-art/gameCoverId,242550/ Toys Hobbies and Crafts September 1982 pg. 18 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E.T._the_Extra-Terrestrial https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dukes_of_Hazzard#Casting_of_Coy_and_Vance Recommended Links: The History of How We Play: https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/ Gaming Alexandria: https://www.gamingalexandria.com/wp/ They Create Worlds: https://tcwpodcast.podbean.com/ Digital Antiquarian: https://www.filfre.net/ The Arcade Blogger: https://arcadeblogger.com/ Retro Asylum: http://retroasylum.com/category/all-posts/ Retro Game Squad: http://retrogamesquad.libsyn.com/ Playthrough Podcast: https://playthroughpod.com/ Retromags.com: https://www.retromags.com/ Sound Effects by Ethan Johnson of History of How We Play. Copyright Karl Kuras Find out on the VGNRTM  

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine
Magnavox Odyssey Special

Video Game Newsroom Time Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 195:25


50 years ago, television manufacturer Magnavox launched a revolutionary new device that allowed users, for the first time, to manipulate the images on their home television sets.  How did this technological wonder come to be?  How did its development evolve?  Find out with our own resident Warden of the Department of Corrections, Ethan Johnson.   Links: https://www.mobygames.com/game/super-breakout/cover-art/gameCoverId,20988/ https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2014/07/13/the-browning-of-mcdonalds/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnavox_Odyssey https://twitter.com/j_ljunggren/status/1573688288661180416 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakout_(video_game) https://thehistoryofhowweplay.wordpress.com/2022/09/16/the-first-video-game-console-a-new-history/   Timeline: August 31, 1966 - Baer conceptualizes the TV Gaming Display.     -He was supposedly in New York and was meeting somebody before going back up to New Hampshire.   September 1, 1966 - “Disclosure Backup DATA - TVGD” is drafted by Ralph Baer, witnessed by Bob Solomon.     -Game types: Action games, board games, artistic games, instructional games, board chase games     -”Example: ‘Steering' a wheel to control random drift of color (hue) over the CRT face”     -Pumping game mentioned     -”Bar, line, or dot generation - players control selective blanking, blinking, color coding of lines, bars, dots, fields via generator”   September 6, 1966 - TV Mode Data Entry Device, witnessed by Bob Solomon, Baer mocks up a schematic of the basic technical idea of driving signals to the screen.     -”Etch-a-sketch” drawing gives misleading impression of the vision of the system at present   December 1966 - Mocking up of screen splitting   December 20, 1966 - Herbert Campman approves the exploration of TVGD, “NBDA - Low Cost TV Data Entry Devices”     -$2000 for development, $500 for materials   January 2, 1967 - Robert Solomon joins “TVTY - NBD”     -His mockups show the screen split into even grids via an overlay or of two lines crossing each other like a cursor   February 6, 1967 - Robert Tremblay writes a schematic.   February 11, 1967 - “Discussion w/ R. Solomon Future planning - TV Gaming”     -Heathkit generator being used for driving objects, “to allow generation of a vertical bar, movable across the TV CRT face, & adjustable color”     -Modulator is set to Channel 3     -Next objective is to split the tv into two independent colors     -Pumping contest mentioned   February 12, 1967 - “List of possible games” using horizontal split of the screen, best illustration of their possibilities at this time     -Scoring, Bucket Filling, Game Timer, Skill Games     -Joystick controller sketched   February 17, 1967 - Bill Harrison sketches up electronics for the gun controller, “Odd-Even TV Game”   May 2, 1967 - Harrison writes up a spec on how TV color and video signals work     -Indicates them going back to square one     -Subsequent days see a number of schematics   May 4, 1967 - “TV Gaming”, illustration of split screen idea -“One major problem exist due to the inability to pass a 60 cps square through the picture tube. [...] This is at least partially due to poor low frequency response of the Heath IG-62.”   May 8, 1967 - “TV Generator” custom hardware for running through the Heath generator.     -Tested first on a RCA Model GH 560W   May 9, 1967 - Various game elements are toyed around with     -Diagrams for two pots to act as a “joystick” and a different implementation of the pumping game     -”1 Sound, 2 Pot [Circle drawing] Color Wheel, 3 Bars Vert & Hor”   May 10, 1967 - “Misc. Ideas for T.V.G.” by Bill Rusch to Ralph Baer     -1. Picture Drawing, pots or joysticks plus buttons for choosing color, “Need memory scheme, of course”     -2. Car Steering, movable road, top down or first person     -3. “Same as 2, but skiing”     -4. Chase Game, “Use ships, dots ot probably best two old “dog fighting” type WWI planes… or, up-to-date, plane and missile… or ship and torpedo.”     -5. Maze Game, “if hits line of maze, “rat” disappears and reappears back at the starting point”     -6. Rotating Spiral, “Maybe have 2nd player control instantaneous rotation speed”     -7. Racing game, disappearing if touching bounds, “if car in rear runs into car in front, rear offending car disappears and other one wins”     -8. “Roulette” (in quotations), with arrow at the top of the wheel     -9. “Baseball” Guessing Game, different colored strips, “Batter selects strip in which bat will appear. Pitch pushes “pitch” button, bell rings and ball appears on screen [...] If both appear in same strip, “HIT” Sign flashes [...] otherwise, “Strike” lights up.”     -10. Baseball “Skill Game” #1, “As above, except “ball” stays on for brief period only”     -11. “Map” Game - 1 or 2 Players, “”Teacher” (Player #1 or the “machine”) pushes button which lights up one state and starts timer displayed on screen”, timed with right and wrong buttons     -12. “Tracer Bullet Shooting Game”, player adjust briefly flashing bullets with the joystick to hit a plane then timer stops, “Could also make into single player game by having planes' movements controlled automatically and semi-randomly”     -13. “Baseball Skill Game” #2, selectable skill levels, pitching game Holy Baseballs, Batman!”     -14. Skeet Shooting #1, similar to plane game     -15. ESP Game, players try to guess each other's numbers represented by colors (showing that they couldn't do alphanumerics)     -16. “Hares and Hounds” Game, hares are numerous and small and move quickly whereas hounds are large and move slowly     -17. “Bullfight”, same as above with singular dots and using color for the cape     -18. “Soccer, Hockey, Polo, etc.”, would have team number players, “When displayed ball (puck, etc.) is touched by a man it moves in direction man was going”     -19. Skeet (Airplane) Shooting #2, “Probably best to have “stored” random target program so each player gets same choice of targets for score comparison”     -20. Golf Putting, two controls for choosing angle and power of the ball     -21. “Horse Racing”, another guessing game with color, features the bell again, “Note: The above would make an interesting “Non-TV” Board Game… perhaps could sell idea to someone like Parker Brothers”     -Pings Baer, J Mason, Bill Rusch, and Bob Solomon   May 15, 1967 - Games listed include a game with a telephone dial using the bar up the screen method, and a double bar graph game     -”To Produce Moveable Dot”, “To Produce Lines” outlines   May 16, 1967 - Several games outlined     -1st game, “Pumping Contest”, with a board featuring two buttons. Player one presses the fill the bucket, player two presses to lower the bucket.     -2nd game, “Firefighter's Pump Test”, color shifts from red to blue as player uses a two-sided pump mechanism. Interestingly the controller is atop a similar one to the pumping contest controller with “S2 not used” suggesting a modular controller.     -3rd game, “Color Catching Contest”. Players have to stop a cycling color on the screen that they call out. A variation using a “Flywheel or phonograph turntable” with a stop button, players have to select their color on the turning device after selecting the color on the overlay. Players have a +30/-30 score table on the overlay.     -4th game, “Roulette”. Physical roulette wheel, same as color guessing game. Implies color may switch on screen according to where the ball is on the reel.     -TVG #5, “Car Ride (Race)”. Shifting driving game with special controller. Includes a wheel, a shift, and an accelerator. Harrison suggests giving player 2 control of the shifting road via a joystick.   May 18, 1967 - First game of “Pumping Contest” is played.     -”Winners name will be withheld”   May 19, 1967 - “Car Ride” may be successfully implemented     -May 22, Baer suggests it be made two player who both use joysticks rather than the drive setup.   May 24, 1967 - “TV Generator”, successful production of two independent spots.   May 31, 1967 - Attempts to add on-TV audio. Schematic is crossed out for unknown reason.   June 1, 1967 - Ralph Baer toys with a checkerboard chase game with obstacles. Subsequent pages show maze-like design patterns.     -Bill Harrison toys with circular switches for changing game functionality and audio again.   June 5, 1967 - “Target Shooting Game” is revived. Gun barrel is made with a cardboard tube with a photocell at the other end.   June 7, 1967 - Archives two independent dots, a line, and a color background. Both background and one dot are green.     -Only able to switch between two colors for things like the Color game, green and blue.   June 14 - “Cludge” introduced for generating random numbers through “a digitally coded card is inserted in the dismatchy”.     -Use of “cludge”, an MIT hacker term.     -Said it would be a way to player a monopoly-type game.   June 14/15 1967 - Presentation of the games and funding proposal.     -14th show for Herbert Campman, 15th show for Royden Sanders, Harold Pope, and D Chisholm -Proposal for “Special Display Techniques”, “To investigate the feasibility of using Raster Scan Displays for low-data-rate graphic display applications”    -Requires three engineers, six techs, and 0-3 admins.         -Expected completion in January 1968. Design Aug-Sept, Breadboarding Sept-December, Final Report in January -Total budget of $17,240 -”Summary of Major Games”     -”Chess Board Game”, chase game where the player can only move orthogonally.     -”Fox Hunt”, three player game with fox, hunter, and scorekeeper. Fox is red.     -”Fox & Hounds Chase”, two players with three hounds and one fox. Fox tries to get from upper right to lower left.     -”Target Shooting”, stationary or moving targets     -”Color Guessing Game”, physical spinner and score kept with TV     -”Bucket Filling Game”, Pumping Contest   June 15, 1967 - “Items for Coverage” new list of games ideas     -”Analogic (Sleep Inducing) Application”, pattern generator, would have an automatic TV shutoff.     -”Child & Adult Psychology Test”, building blocks, “Textile, wallpaper design generation”     -”Warship vs Torpedo Boat”, animated streak flies towards the warship. IMPORTANT     -”Use of phonograph record to explain game”, prior use of cassette tape.     -”Target Shooting”, given new feature targets. “Add Sound, Limit Ammunition Available, Adjustable Sights”     -”Drawing Games”, said to use “optical memory”. Would have a phosphorescent painted overlay “For use in dark room only”     -Plan to use a phonograph to alter the game state     -A game for learning binary   June 15, 1967 - “Alternate Course for TV Game”, reordering of the technology     -So much happening on this day indicates a worry over the project future.   June 16, 1967 - Circuit card concept presented by Bill Harrison, cards essentially act the same as pin connectors would   June 17, 1967 - “TV Gaming - Status Report & Brief Review of TVG Applications”     -1. Decision of separate unit or integrated into TV set, “Note: Type 1A above could be provided in KIT form” (with a rectangle around KIT form)     -2. They would build a stand alone unit, circuit cards for Target Shooting and Chess games specifically     -3. A full list of applications: “Games for Entertainment, Skill, Chance, Artistic Games, Instructional Games, Bar graphs and lines, Card Games, Sports Games, Wargames, Probability games/study, Clinical Psychology Tool, Analogic”         -”Special effects” including disappearing, blinking, and phonograph/tape recording   July 7, 1967 - When the next batch of documents pick up.     -Parts testing, a switch to monochrome, focus on the light gun.   August 3, 1967 - Harrison conducts a test of the power with batteries.     -Giant RCA 9 volt battery.   September 15, 1967 - R&D Plan, summary     -Notes on approach and scope         -”Paper study and demonstration of applications for reaction and feedback”         -”Attempt circuit simplifications, aiming toward cost dedication”         -”Find source of contact overlays”         -”Create additional minimum cost functions for increased versatility” What could this mean?         -”Creation additional applications for system”     -New cost estimate of $8101, running through November         -”Develop added applications for existing equipment”         -”Modify equipment for added applications”         -”Demonstrate equipment and rework applications”   September 29, 1967 - Bill Rusch begins to try and come up with more applications for the two hardware dots.   October 4, 1967 - Special Sales Order for TVG project.     -Ralph Baer, Equipment Design, William Rusch, Task Manager. No Harrison.     -Pings a huge number of people in the company for the first time   October 10, 1967 - Harrison plays around with field shapes, not as complicated as the mazes but with rectangular variations.   October 12, 1967 - Bill Rusch works on circuit simplification.   October 18, 1967 - “Moving Spot for TVG”, the idea of something which could bounce around various spots on the screen. The spots would be predetermined and controlled via a push button to cycle through the various spots.     -First idea was a batting game which would send the ball back to its thrown position     -Second idea was Ping Pong, “coincidence” is introduced     -”Gun Ping Pong” as a target shooting game with predetermined paths set by off screen dots   October 31, 1967 - “TV Gaming Device” schematics are drawn up.     Game Sequence (10 games): Checker Games, Chase Games, Ping Pong, Hockey, Volly Ball, Checkers with Obstacle, Hand Ball, Target Shooting, Pumping Game, Golf   November 3, 1967 - William Rusch proposing circular ball for a soccer game   November 7, 1967 - Monthly status report by Bill Rusch for October, “A new system concept has been implemented. It offers cost savings and permits new classes of applications.”   November 15, 1967 - “Create New Fields” by Rusch, paths and tracks for games like racing, ‘collision' games (like orbiting planet lines), and missile game.   November 20, 1967 - Checkerboard generation by Rusch, Pool and golf game ideas with ricochet shots   November 21, 1967 - With a “Breakthru” that appears to be a trigger of the coincidence circuit, Rusch comes up with a list of several “APPLICATIONS”     -Pool, Ping Pong (with direction and speed determined by player object), Soccer, Ping Pong (over a center net, like TfT), “Ski Ball”, “Golf shot to elevated green”, Football Kick (forward facing), “Golf Putting Several (dark) holes”, “Better Football (Field Goal) Kick” (side view), Soccer/Hockey, Race Car with bumping vehicles, Volley Ball, “Doubles Ping Pong or Tennis), Golf with Five Spots     -Implementation of shadows     -”Penny Arcade Hockey” with spinning shapes as the bats, similar to Chicago Coins' Goalee   December 4, 1967 - More illustrated game ideas by Rusch. New semi star-like shape to represent player     -”Ball on a Band/Balloon Bounce”, bouncing a ball off a paddle to see how many times it can be hit     -”Dart Throwing” with gravitational pull     -”Basket Shooting”, 1 or 2 players     -”Plane + Ship Shooting + Bombing”, plane circles above and bombs hip below. Both move on set paths.     -”Two Planes shooting at each other”, basically Jet Fighter     -”RACE GAME with Int. joysticks, Obstacles and Bouncing!”, bouncing around an environment with walls     -”Boxing”, rudimentary humans, undecided if top or bottom view     -”Handball”, bounces off sides of the screen and drains on bottom     -”Pinball Game”, gains points if it hits dots on overlays as it ricochets. Drains through black box on overlay.     “Hands Off Bounce-Chase”, players bounce around until they collide with each other, marking the time   December 6-12 1967 - Harrison and Rusch investigate pool and hockey. Initially the circuits seem to be a no go, but success is reported on the 12.   December 13, 1967 - Rusch proposes new TVG ideas     -”Ouija Board TV set Game”     -”Puzzles - kids can ‘build' pictures with visual multi-shaped ‘blocks' etc” Demonstration visual is a pentomino         -Rusch outlines a vase-like figure “Silhouette”     -”Puppet Shows”     -Presuming a battery powered TV, ”Cheap Radar for Boats? Car tuner etc, In Planes?”   December 18, 1967 - “Mirror system on piano, organ”   December 20, 1967 - Other Rusch ideas     -”Combine TV and Telephone”     -”Shooting Galley with moving ducks and spinning hills”     -”Use TV as Oscilloscope”   January 2, 1968 - Report for December 1967     -”Additional operating modes (rebounding, shrinking target size) display circuitry was developed and demonstrated”     -Patent applications to be submitted   January 4, 1968 - Rusch, “MUST PERSEVERE FOR CREATIVE IDEAS”   January 11, 1968 - Harison to do list for gun, now in its rifle form     -”Finish pistol”     -”Put function from PC board into chassis”     -Photocell sync   January 17, 1968 - “Cost Estimate (Electronics Only)” by Harrison     -”Gun, $2.60”     -”Antenna Crowbar, $.51”     -”3 spot function box, $12.00”, 24 transistors, 1 Silicon controlled rectifier, 1 photocell, 1 inductive pick-up coil, 8 thin potentiometers, 8 long shaft potentiometers, 30 diodes, 60 resistors, 20 capacitores, 8 electrolytic capacitors. 161 parts, 10 individual parts.     -Total, $15.11   January 18, 1968 to February 19 - Meetings with Teleprompter/CATV about licensing the device.   January 26, 1968 - “CATV Demo Box”, for using a direct broadcast signal   January 31, 1968 - Herbert Campman issues a stop order for the project   February 20, 1968 - Harrison works on gun electronics     -Indications by numbering on the documents suggests there may have been other interim activity on either side   August 11, 1968 - Harrison resumes schematic work     -Creates general layouts for their functionality at present         -Includes generation of several spot types: Round ball, a diamond shape, the star-like shape, a vertical rounded rectangle, and a wide rounded rectangle   September 6-17, 1968 - Harrison is given the task to use Rusch's circuits to do five important functions:     -”Video ?”, “Coincidence detectors”, “Gated Differentiator”, “Wall Bounce”, “DMV Voltage Controlled”   October 26, 1968 - “LIST OF GAMES Playable w/ Various Configuations ”Games are prepared split into four categories. 2 spots with coincidence, 3 spots with reciprocate, 3 spots with Net/Wall line, 3 spots + ball and coincidence     -”Overlay Checker Games, Maze Games”     -”Chase Games”     -”Ping Pong, w/o net, w/ net”     -”Hockey (with overlay goals)     -”Handball, single handed, doubles”     -”Gun Games (gun added), single spot stationary or manually moved, ball intercept (auto or manual)”'     -”Golf Putting Game”     -Color still a noted feature of system   January 1969 - Noted as an approximate date, new games list     -”Handball”, “Ping Pong”, “Volley Ball”, “Hockey”, “Golf Putting”, “checkers Games”, “Chase”, “Target”, “Pumping Game”, “Coed Square Games - Add code generator”     -Controller with two potentiometers and one button is created     -Games currently toggled with a switch         -”1st position - table tennis or hockey”         -”2nd position - Chase or Overlay games + rifle”         -”3rd position - Hand Ball (incomplete)”   January 14, 1969 - Meeting with RCA.   March 1969 - New “TVG - DigBox” “Conservative estimate” of parts and price     -Without two players, case, controllers, gun, or connectors     -$12.65 total. 35 diodes, 30 transistors, 90 resistors, 1 silicon controlled rectifier, 10 large capacitors, 15 small capacitors, 10 potentiometers, 1 PC Board   March 10, 1969 - Meeting with Zenith.   March 12, 1969 - Meeting with GE.   March 18, 1969 - Meeting with Sylvania.   April 2, 1969 - Meeting with RCA.   May 7, 1969 - Meeting with GE.   May 26, 1969 - “Hockey ADD ON for TVG” by Bill Rusch     -Would allow for ball to move in the direction of the hit, with velocity, and bounce off walls     -Two separate generators for square and round ball spots     -Cost $12.00 for the electronics, plus $5.00 for the joysticks   May 28, 1969 - Meeting with GE and a representative from the Institute for Analytical Research.   May 29, 1969 - “Round Spot for TVG ??” by Harrison, seeming to express disbelief that they are still trying     Meeting with Motorola. (Warwick was demonstrated to at some point and Sony was considered, if not strictly demonstrated)   July 1970 - Magnavox representatives, encouraged by Bill Enders formerly of RCA, come for a demonstration of the Brown Box.   August 26, 1970 - Baer and Lou Etlinger travel to Magnavox's headquarters in Fort Wayne to demonstrate the Brown Box.   1971 - Bill Harrison creates a game list with the logic gates denoted as well as a currently unused color switch     -Ping Pong. Hockey, Hand Ball, “Volley Ball (also checkers with obstacle)”, “Pumping Game ?”, Target Shooting, Chase Game, Checker Games, Golf Putting, Code Gen   March 11th, 1971 - Sanders and Magnavox sign their initial licensing agreement for the technology of the Brown Box.   March 30, 1971 - Visit to Magnavox in Fort Wayne report by Baer     -In attendance: Gerry Martin (Console Product Dev), Bob Sanders (VP Engineering), Bob Wiles (Color TV Product Mfg), Bob Grant (TV Engineer Manager), Paul Knauer (Chief Color TV Engineer), George Kent (Section Chief, Color TV Engineering), Clarence Graef (Color Engineer), Gene Kile (Manager of Design), Clyde “Wiley” Welbaum (Design Director)     -Baer went with Kile and Welbaum. Harrison met with Kanuer, Kent, Graef, and Grant.         -Baer group was taped, 4 hour discussion         -”It was pointed out that product introduction in the TV business occurs in April & May”, unlikely for 1972     -”There was a positive attitude displayed by all attendees to the demo and at subsequent sessions with the exception of Bob Saunders who refused to enter into the spirit of the TV, as he did on our prior visit - cannot ‘read' his real position as yet.”     -”All parties recognize the need for an engineering team supported by at least one non-engineering, creative, imaginative software man”     -The control would have two controllers with 4-6 ft wires, use circuit cards, to look like a portable cassette recorder   June 10, 1971 - Bill Harrison does more schematics on “Chroma Gen for Magnavox”   June 28, 1971 - Harrison produces notes on a Magnavox meeting     -”gun not so good”     -Meeting happening in New York to discuss saleability of machine, marketing of the games such as names and whatnot     -George Kent is optimistic   July 20, 1971 - “Skill-O-Vision” by Bob Wiles outlines their plans for a market test     -Idea was discussed in San Diego with a man named Ken Crane     -Test would be conducted from Monday the 26 to Thursday the 29th     -Bob Wiles, Clarence Graef, and Vern Parnell would demonstrate the device   Provided Questionnaire outlines both a script and a set of questions     -”Under no circumstances will the electronic games impair your television reception”     -Game cards are used, English control is implemented, Reset button     -Games are Ping Pong, Checkerboard I, States and Capitals, Baseball, Rifle Range Questions, filled out in a California and a Michigan (October) test, 82 respondents:     -Interest         -89% Very much     -Like and dislike         -Top likes: competitive, Unique, Educational     -Preference of game card or a dial selector     -Demographic: Adults, Teens, Preteends, Grade Schoolers, Preschoolers         -Adults     -Other toys     -”Do you Presently Own a Color TV Set?”         -78% yes     -Preference on Skill-O-Vision name         -65% like     -”Would you buy this product if it were offered for sale at $75? If no, what price do you think the product should sell for?”         -80% yes     -Married or single     -Age of head of house     -Education level of head of house     -Income bracket   October 1971 - A decision is made to market the console   October 15, 1971 - Robert Fritsche memo on Skill-O-Vision, interprets data from the initial tests to push for family marketing and a new name   February 2nd, 1972 - Magnavox signs the final agreement to put the Brown Box system out on the market imminently.   April 25, 1972 - Odyssey patents accepted.   May 3, 1972 - The first Magnavox Profit Caravan show is held in Phoenix, Arizona.   May 23-25, 1972 - The Magnavox show in Burlingame.   August 1, 1972 - Another agreement is signed between Magnavox and Sanders.   September 1972 - Odyssey from Magnavox is released.     -Materials and labor costs are $35 for the console, $99.95 general cost.   November 28, 1972 - Robert Fritsche sends out a memo about Odyssey survey cards, letters, and interesting reports on Odyssey's use     -LA Air Traffic Control purchased two units for a training program with modification     -Veterans Administration in NY (Bioengineering Research Service), created qudrapalegic accessible version with a microswitch behind the head     -University of Kentucky testing motor responses with two units     -Optometrist in NJ, “He has modified the conditions under which Odyssey is used to better develop binocular, hand-eye, and other ocular skills.”     -High schools to use Odyssey in “Visual Training programs”     -”Head Start” in Maryland studying Odyssey   November 27, 1972 - A Bally lawyer calls Magnavox over the question of licensing     -Magnavox says they are not current in the position to designate sub-licensees.   April 1973 - Magnavox begins sending out legal probes.     -Terms of license are 7% on net sales, $5000 advance, no less than $1000 per year.         -Later reduced to 6% and $500 minimum.   April 15, 1974 - Bally files suit in New York, Magnavox files suit in Chicago. The former files for invalidation of the patents, the other files for infringement.     -Seeburg Industries Inc, The Seeburg Corporation, Williams Electronics Inc, World Wide Distributors are added.   September 1974 - Magnavox bought by Philips.   July 1975 - Atari files suit against Magnavox for invalidation.     -Quickly incorporated into the main case.   September 1975 - Sears gets added due to Home Pong.   January 1976 - Standard license agreement     -$100,000 advance     -5% for the first 250,000 units     -4% for the second 250,000 units     -3% in excess of 500,000 units   June 1976 - Atari, Bally, and Sears settle.     -Atari licensing agreement. $1.5 million in installments. 4% first 20,000 units, 3% after.     -”ATARI hereby grants to MAGNAVOX and SANDERS, subject to the reservations [...] a fully paid non-exclusive license to make, have made, use, sell and lease LICENSED PRODUCTS under the ATARI PATENTS, without the right to sublicense. ATARI further grants to MAGNAVOX and to SANDERS an option to grant non-exclusive sublicenses in foreign countries outside the United States under ATARI PATENTS provided that a payment is made to ATARI of 1% of the Net selling Price of the sub-licensed products.”   January 1977 - Initial case finalized in Magnavox's favor.   September 1977 - APF Electronics, Unisonic, Executive Games, URL, Taito America, Control Sales, Jewel Co, Osco Drug, Turn-Style, Jay-Kay Distributors, K-Mart, Bennet Bros, Venture Electronic International all sued by Magnavox.     -Fairchild, Allied Leisure, and Radio Shack also sued.     -Appears to be piecemealed off in settlements.     -URL does go bankrupt and Magnavox sues for settlement.   1978 - Bally is sued again over Bally Professional Arcade.   1980 - Magnavox v Mattel is filed     -Ends in 1982 after a 9 day trial, settlement at the 11th hour.     -Establishes precedent for programmable games.   1982 - Magnavox v Activision   1982 - APF and MIT jointly sue Magnavox     -Bolkow patents   1984 - Bally sued AGAIN   1986 - Magnavox v Nintendo     -Over both the original patents and the light gun   1992 - Magnavox v Sega of America   1993 - American Vending Sales, Inc, Atlas Distributing, Inc, Capcom U.S.A. Inc, Coin Machine Corporation of America, Data East U.S.A. Inc, Konami America Inc, Leland Corporation, Romstar Inc, Snk Corporation of America, Temco, Inc, Tradewest Inc, World Wide Distributors Inc, Taito America Corporation sued.   February 15, 1994 - “Konami agreed to pay North American Philips $495,000.  This amount represented a 3% royalty for each game Konami sold between June 1987 and April 1989 that incorporated the patented device”  

Workbook Radio
Episode 077- Jonathan Rice, Part 1

Workbook Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 10:26


Jonathan Rice is a poster artist, illustrator and designer. Jonathan has years of experience working for some of the country's largest agencies and brands like Y&R, Tracy Locke, Pepsi, and P&G. But Jonathan's heart was always drawn to making great, visually interesting Illustrations, art and design that everyone can appreciate and love. On this episode we talk about Jonathan's career of many hats, how he's gotten back to illustration, and his advice to other who think it's too late to pursue what they love. To view Jonathan's portfolio, click here.  To view Jonathan's webiste, click here. More on Jonathan: Jonathan is a creative visualist and brand consultant who believes in delivering the BIG IDEA no matter what medium it takes to do so. And he's done that everywhere he's worked. Jonathan's creative skills have been honed over twenty-five years working for some of the country's largest advertising agencies—like DDB Dallas/Tracy Locke, The Lord Group/Y&R, Temerlin McClain (TM Advertising) and Eisenberg & Associates. Jonathan has been fortunate to work with influential and sought-after brands including: Pepsi, GTE, Verizon, Texas Instruments, Procter and Gamble, RadioShack and SmithKline.   Jonathan ventured into the world of public affairs and political advertising during his stint as Creative Director at The Eppstein Group, one of the most successful public affairs advertising firms in Texas. His creative work helped contribute to the firm's winning percentage (better than 90%) in local, regional and statewide elections during his tenure.   A master of his craft, Jonathan has proven his skills in advertising, branding and identity development, direct marketing, strategy, conceptual thinking, broadcast, print, and digital creative. In his industry, he's known for creating client partnerships built on trust, respect and results.   Since graduating from the University of Texas at Arlington, Jonathan's stellar work has been highlighted in industry publications such as Communication Arts, Archive, Print, and Graphic Design USA, winning numerous local and national awards in broadcast, print, newspaper and outdoor. Many of his logos and corporate identities have been featured in the celebrated Logo Lounge book series.   Jonathan and his wife Sandra, a copywriter and aspiring novelist, have two beautiful grown daughters and one brand new baby granddaughter. He is also a self-confessed “Disney nerd” who revels in taking friends and family on yearly expeditions to Walt Disney World.

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
From Punched Cards to Java 11

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 59:03


An airhacks.fm conversation with Glenn Holmer (@gholmer) about: astrology, TRS-80, Radio Shack, learning Basic, RPG and COBOL in 8 month, working for weyco group incorporated, learning assembly with core dumps, blanks instead of zeros, enjoying modern Cobol, running warehouse software on Novell Netware, starting with Java 1.1 in 1997, anonymous inner classes and JDBC were introduced with Java 1.1, AS 400 support for Java was excellent, Java and NDS, running Applets in a browser, HotJava the browser in Java, icefaces and ICEBrowser, creating a web app with Java servlets, starting with Tomcat, switching to Glassfish, starting with plain editors, then NetBeans, Programmers Paradise, CodeWarrior metrowerks, forte for java IDE, becoming the very first Java programmer, the ultrasonic box scanner, migrating from GlassFish to Payara, writing millions lines of code with a team of five, remembering jEdit Glenn Holmer on twitter: @gholmer

The High Performance Zone
Jerome "BONE" Maldonado a 9-figure Real Estate Investor and Equity Owner of Radioshack, Modell's, Pier 1 Imports and much, much more is a prime example of having a good work ethic trumps all.

The High Performance Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 73:07


Jerome Maldonado has built a super-successful career in the construction industry. Over the years, he's founded multiple companies and amassed an eight-figure business empire. However, he's also experienced plenty of setbacks along the way. So today, in his capacity as a coach, Jerome shares the lessons he's learned from his decades of entrepreneurship and teaches others how to invest in commercial real estate.In this episode, you'll hear from Jerome Maldonado on:(00:20:30) His dark night of the soul. Jerome recalls the moment when ridden with debt and despair, he prayed for divine intervention in an El Paso church. (00:27:04) His formula for financial success. He talks about the ethics that guide him in business and puts forward his belief that financial success only happens when you finally stop caring about what everybody else around you is thinking.(00:40:27) His winner's mindset. Jerome describes how he got started in the construction industry and credits his rapid success to his phenomenal work ethic and his ‘nothing to lose and everything to gain' mentality.(01:00:57) Good debt versus bad debt. He differentiates between good debt, which enables you to buy assets that produce income (such as rent or dividends), and bad debt, which does not contribute to your wealth.(01:12:13) Letting go of limiting beliefs. Jerome urges everyone to stop living scared and have the courage to live life and do business on their own terms without being crippled by the fear of failure or feeling anxious about being judged by others.

The NPCs - Video Game Commentary, Video Game News, And More!
The NPCs Discuss - The Arcade Resurgence

The NPCs - Video Game Commentary, Video Game News, And More!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 53:59


#Arcade #BandaiNamco #Arcade1Up In this week's episode of Discuss, we take a look at the resurgence of a beloved form of video game entertainment and what its revival means for gamers and non-gamers alike. I'm of course talking about the Arcade! While the Arcades in the US had begun to drift into the murky depths that imprison Blockbuster and Radio Shack, it doesn't mean they went away for good. The home console space and its adoption of online play made for a more enticing experience than leaving the house with a pocket full of quarters. Many local arcades began to close up shop and resell their cabinets to collectors or to other arcades that needed replacements for their own broken cabinets. As the waves of nostalgia took over many people's imaginations and motivations, we started to see a change in the arcade market. Cabinets became even more expensive to purchase, so for one to play arcade classics it became a slight challenge. However, the idea to make your own using nothing more than a cheap $35 PC took off and soon everyone who wanted an arcade of their own in their own home could make it happen. And the industry took notice. Companies now sell build-it-yourself flat pack arcade cabinets, and adoption of new arcade titles and ideas brought both old and new back into the floors of the arcades we knew and loved. Intro & Outro: Run by J+1 Pick up his tracks on Bandcamp today @ https://jplusone.bandcamp.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-npcs-podcast/support

Telecom Radio One
170. Director of IT Joe Whalen Takes a Break From Hosting His Own Podcasts to Be a Guest on Ours

Telecom Radio One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:42


Joe Whalen Joe Whalen is the Director of Information Technology at an electronics manufacturer in the DOD sector. With 30 years of experience in the industry, ranging from Radio Shack to his current position, Joe found himself falling into leadership early in his career. Of course, leadership is still a crucial part of what he...

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 3: Some RadioShack dealers aren't happy

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 29:34


5pm - Sue Bird's career ends as Aces top Storm to reach to Finals // Bill Barr Says DOJ ‘Getting Very Close' to Having Sufficient Evidence to Indict Trump' // Some RadioShack Dealers Aren't Happy as the Brand Leans on NSFW Tweets // Hillary Clinton says she switched to wearing pantsuits after 'suggestive' photos were taken of her and used in a lingerie ad in Brazil // LETTERSSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cyclist Magazine Podcast
61. Sam Bewley loves Giants, hates motorbikes (sometimes)

Cyclist Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 68:56


Team BikeExchange-Jayco's Sam Bewley joins Anthony and James from Girona, a few weeks before calling time on a career than spanned 14 years and took him from racing at Livestrong under the tutelage of Axel Merckx, to a brief stint at Radioshack with Lance Armstrong to a lengthy career at Orica-GreenEdge. He's learned a few things in that time, including how to eat, how to overtake like he's still racing track and just how important a moto can be in a Grand Tour. He's a good bloke, good racer.For this episode, James is again joined by Anthony Walsh, aka The Roadman Cyclist.For more on the Cyclist Magazine Podcast - https://www.cyclist.co.uk/cyclistmagazinepodcastSubscribe to Cyclist Magazine now - https://cyclistmag.co.uk/cyclistmagazinepodcast Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

AutomationTown
For When You Need A QR Code

AutomationTown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 33:01


Okay okay okay hear me out: printing automation. No come back, it'll be good, I swear.Instead of covering something people want to talk about, Chad & Jason cover printers, and how to build them into your cloud Zapier or Make workflows. Why is that a thing that exists? Why is it a tool you should still have in your toolbelt? Why are you 5 sentences deep into a podcast episode description?The boys also meet Buzz McTompkins, the head of 104.3 TheBuzz, Stuart from Radio Shack calls in with another embarrassing question and we automate a preschool.SHOW NOTES:—------------------------------------------Scott Stratten (QR Codes Kill Kittens): https://jo.my/qrcodeskillkittensQR Code Monkey: https://jo.my/qrcodemonkeyAli Pay: https://jo.my/alipayGO QR: https://jo.my/goqrBeanconStac: https://jo.my/beaconstacJotURL: https://jo.my/joturlqrLitter Robot: https://jo.my/litter-robotIFTTT: https://jo.my/iftttN8N: https://jo.my/n8nAUTOMATIONTOWN SOCIALS:—------------------------------------------Twitter: https://t.jo.my/twitterWeb: https://t.jo.my/automationtownRSS Feed: https://t.jo.my/rssABOUT HOSTS:—------------------------------------------Chad DavisTwitter: https://t.jo.my/chad-twitterLinkedIn: https://t.jo.my/chad-linkedinJason StaatsTwitter: https://t.jo.my/jstaats-twitterYoutube: https://t.jo.my/jason-youtubeAUDIO PRODUCTION:—------------------------------------------Paul O'Mara - https://t.jo.my/paulomaraSPONSORS:—------------------------------------------Want to sponsor an episode? Contact us at https://t.jo.my/sponsorcontact 

AutomationTown
For When You Need To Print

AutomationTown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 29:10


Okay okay okay hear me out: printing automation. No come back, it'll be good, I swear.Instead of covering something people want to talk about, Chad & Jason cover printers, and how to build them into your cloud Zapier or Make workflows. Why is that a thing that exists? Why is it a tool you should still have in your toolbelt? Why are you 5 sentences deep into a podcast episode description?The boys also meet Buzz McTompkins, the head of 104.3 TheBuzz, Stuart from Radio Shack calls in with another embarrassing question and we automate a preschool.SHOW NOTES:—------------------------------------------Make: https://t.jo.my/integromat-makeZapier: https://t.jo.my/zapierIFTTT: https://jo.my/iftttGoogle Cloud Print: https://jo.my/googleprint PrintNode: https://jo.my/printnodePrintify: https://jo.my/printifySellIntegro: https://jo.my/sellintegroiBeacon: https://jo.my/ibeaconPhilips Hue App: https://jo.my/phueTypeform: https://jo.my/typeformAUTOMATIONTOWN SOCIALS:—------------------------------------------Twitter: https://t.jo.my/twitterWeb: https://t.jo.my/automationtownRSS Feed: https://t.jo.my/rssABOUT HOSTS:—------------------------------------------Chad DavisTwitter: https://t.jo.my/chad-twitterLinkedIn: https://t.jo.my/chad-linkedinJason StaatsTwitter: https://t.jo.my/jstaats-twitterYoutube: https://t.jo.my/jason-youtubeAUDIO PRODUCTION:—------------------------------------------Paul O'Mara - https://t.jo.my/paulomaraSPONSORS:—------------------------------------------Want to sponsor an episode? Contact us at https://t.jo.my/sponsorcontact 

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3667: Hacker Public Radio 2021 - 2022 New Years Show Part 2

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022


Hacker Public Radio New Years Eve Show 2021 - 2022 Part 2 Massachusetts MCAS Tests https://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/ A Level Test mention - http://www.gostudyuk.com/a-levels-and-equivalents/ COVID-19: quarantine, masks, vaccination, testing, etc. Michael Mina @michaelmina_lab https://twitter.com/michaelmina_lab West Virginia & Kentucky Accents https://www.dialectsarchive.com/west-virginia https://www.dialectsarchive.com/kentucky Netminer talks about being a security guard & Security Guard tools of the trade Detex Clock https://www.watchmanclocks.com/productdetails.aspx?ProductID=56 Mag light flashlight https://maglite.com/ Ohio Linux Fest https://olfconference.org/ Not Curses https://notcurses.com/notcurses.3.html Sixel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sixel The Book Of Boba Fett https://www.imdb.com/title/tt13668894/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Boba_Fett Under The Helmet : The Legacy of Boba Fett https://www.imdb.com/title/tt15715890/ Mordancy talks about Mark from Command Line Magic Command Line Magic Homepage - http://www.climagic.org/ Command Line Magic Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/user/climagic/videos Command Line Magic Twitter - https://twitter.com/climagic Command Line Magic Mastadon - https://mastodon.social/@climagic Mordancy also suggests https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse https://explainshell.com/ More Website Suggestions Regex Crossword is a crossword puzzle game, where the crossword clues are defined using regular expressions https://regexcrossword.com Learn VIM while playing a game https://vim-adventures.com/ Tennesee Valley Authority https://www.tva.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_Valley_Authority West Virginia Coal Mines https://www.americangeosciences.org/critical-issues/maps/interactive-map-coal-mines-west-virginia Nuclear Power Plants in the USA https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_the_United_States https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=207&t=3 Moss Wants to Build a Pi Hole https://pi-hole.net/ Take The Long Way Home (SuperTramp) https://youtu.be/zKGOCOAI_2c Push To Talk Mumble Settings https://www.mumble.com/support/mumble-server-push-to-talk.php Dont use Balena Etcher, try instead https://bztsrc.gitlab.io/usbimager/ USBImager is a really really simple GUI application that writes compressed disk images to USB drives and creates backups. Available platforms: Windows, MacOS and Linux. Its interface is as simple as it gets, totally bloat-free. It is very small below 300 KB compared to more the than 130 MB of Etcher. A Maintenance Tool For Ubuntu uCareSystem Core basic https://ostechnix.com/ucaresystem-core-basic-maintenance-tool-ubuntu/ https://github.com/Utappia/uCareSystem To get rid of old kernels with no work - just paste in the commandline echo $(dpkg --list | grep linux-image | awk '{ print $2 }' | sort -V | sed -n '/'`uname -r`'/q;p') $(dpkg --list | grep linux-headers | awk '{ print $2 }' | sort -V | sed -n '/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/([0-9.-]*)-([^0-9]+)/1/")"'/q;p') | xargs echo sudo apt-get -y purge the result is a sudo command to remove old kernels. And finally this one: sudo apt autoremove && sudo apt autoclean && sudo apt clean Moss talks about ArcoLinux https://arcolinux.com/ Minnix uses Funk Whale https://funkwhale.audio/ Moss announces the passing of Betty White - RIP https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/10/entertainment/betty-white-cause-of-death/index.html https://www.rollingstone.com/tv-movies/tv-movie-news/betty-white-dead-obituary-197806/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Golden_Girls https://www.grunge.com/659496/the-truth-about-betty-whites-guinness-world-record/ The guys mention - Ultramarines : A Warhammer 40k movie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultramarines:_A_Warhammer_40,000_Movie https://youtu.be/3fpvOyD5Jr0 Warhammer Cosplay https://youtu.be/9RpfpSyWGhk https://youtu.be/VZ8_aU0G094 https://www.belloflostsouls.net/2020/08/40k-cosplay-the-ultramarine-by-upw-designs.html https://www.instructables.com/Warhammer-40K-Tech-Priest-Cosplay-SKS-Props/ Matrix Movie (Matrix Resurrections) + other NPH (Neil Patrick Harris) films https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Matrix_Resurrections https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10838180/ 8-Bit Christmas https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11540284/ Doctor Horrible's Sing-Along https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1227926/ Bruce Campbell in Black Friday + other Bruce projects https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11649338/ Deadite (Evil Dead films) https://evildead.fandom.com/wiki/Deadite Burn Notice https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0810788/ The Adventures of Brisco County Jr. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105932/ Burn Notice Movie - The Fall of Sam Axe https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1697851/ Ash Vs Evil Dead (TV Series) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4189022/ https://evildead.fandom.com/wiki/Ash_vs_Evil_Dead Christian Clemenson https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0166061/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Clemenson Freddie Highmore https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Good_Doctor_(TV_series) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6470478/ Chat about Lenovo ThinkCentre Products https://pcsupport.lenovo.com/us/en/products/desktops-and-all-in-ones/thinkcentre-m-series-desktops/thinkcentre-m58 https://www.lenovo.com/in/en/desktops/thinkcentre/m-series-sff/m83/ https://www.lenovo.com/gb/en/desktops-and-all-in-ones/thinkcentre/m-series-tiny/M700-Tiny/p/11TC1MTM700 Moss Plugs - https://itsmoss.com/ and talks about installing Linux on his ThinkCentre https://itsmoss.com/2021/12/22/installing-linux-on-a-thinkcentre-tiny-m700/ A Deeper Dive Into Funk Whale https://funkwhale.audio/ https://funkwhale.audio/en_GB/faqs#decentralized-and-federated https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Funkwhale https://twitter.com/funkwhaleaudio Peer Tube - Free software to take back control of your videos https://joinpeertube.org/ https://twitter.com/joinpeertube Joe and Danny talk 3-D Printing & Core XY Printers Voron Design https://vorondesign.com/ The Best CoreXY 3D Printers in 2022 https://all3dp.com/1/best-corexy-3d-printer/ The Voron 2.4 Build Experience https://youtu.be/0E0dM0ZdpRE Core XY Explained https://youtu.be/_ramiM3KHYE Volcano Hot End & Block https://e3d-online.com/products/volcano-hotend https://e3d-online.com/products/volcano-block-for-sensor-cartridges CES 2022 https://www.ces.tech/About-CES.aspx Danny gives a thumbs up to the Android Playstation 2 Emulator - Aethersx2 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=xyz.aethersx2.android X-Files : Resist Or Serve for the Playstation 2 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_X-Files:_Resist_or_Serve Walkthrough for X-Files : Resist Or Serve https://youtu.be/_1DoMfufliQ PCSX2 - An Open-Source Playstation 2 Emulator supporting over 98% Of the PS2 library https://pcsx2.net/ GTA Vice City https://www.rockstargames.com/games/vicecity Armored Core : Masters Of Arena https://armoredcore.fandom.com/wiki/Armored_Core:_Master_of_Arena http://www.cheatcodes.com/guide/walkthrough-armored-core-master-of-arena-playstation-16686/ Joe Has Some Tech Repairs to Do Playstation 3 that needs the optical drive repaired https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/PlayStation+3+Blu-ray+Disc+Drive+Replacement/3484 Xbox 360 Drive replacement https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Xbox+360+Optical+Drive+Replacement/3358 Skullcandy HESH 3 Battery Replacement https://youtu.be/PLM7wfTCzms (generic headphone battery replacement video) LG Tone Repair https://youtu.be/DJvzWsT_ESY Open Razer https://openrazer.github.io/ Clonezilla has built in SSH support https://clonezilla.org/ Radio Shack reviving, rebranding into cryptocurrency platform https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/radioshack-rebrands-cryptocurrency-exchange-platform https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/pop-culture-news/radioshack-clarify-twitter-wasnt-hacked-just-sell-crypto-now-rcna36112 Deal Extreme https://www.dx.com/ Brick & Mortar Computer Stores Past & Present COMP USA https://www.compusa.com/ Fry's Electronics https://www.frys.com/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fry%27s_Electronics Micro Center https://www.microcenter.com/ Tiger Direct https://www.tigerdirect.com/ Ben Heck & Oscilloscopes https://youtu.be/RuC8XmDX9iA Mordancy has projects https://www.proxmox.com/en/ https://www.docker.com/ https://jitsi.org/ https://joinpeertube.org/ https://matrix.org/ https://bitbucket.org/product F(x)tec Pro¹ Phone https://www.fxtec.com/ Joe and Mordancy chat Cryptocurrency https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/cryptocurrency.asp Nishant gives up Windows for Fedora https://getfedora.org/en/workstation/download/ Linux LPIC Certifications https://www.lpi.org/our-certifications/summary-of-certifications https://www.lpi.org/our-certifications/lpic-1-overview https://www.lpi.org/our-certifications/lpic-2-overview ITIL Certification https://www.axelos.com/certifications/itil-service-management 3M PELTOR ComTac™ VI Hearing Defender https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/v100849027/ TP-120 Socket https://connectors.nexus.com/item/telephone-plugs-and-jacks/telephone-plugs/tp-120 Fluke 107 Pocket Digital Multimeter https://www.fluke.com/en-us/product/electrical-testing/digital-multimeters/pocket-107 Razer Nari Ultimate Headset https://www.razer.com/gaming-headsets/razer-nari-ultimate/RZ04-02670100-R3U1 Garuda Linux https://garudalinux.org/ Centos https://www.centos.org/ FreeBSD https://www.freebsd.org/ Q-tile - A full-featured, hackable tiling window manager written and configured in Python http://www.qtile.org/ Adam WIlliamson - Fedora Team https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/User:Adamwill https://www.happyassassin.net/ https://twitter.com/adamw_ha https://fedoramagazine.org/fedora-qa-adam-williamson/ Raspberry Pi Price Jump https://www.tomshardware.com/news/raspberry-pi-4-supply-issues Headphone Repair Chat BeyerDynamic DT770 https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DT770pro80--beyerdynamic-dt-770-pro-80-ohm-closed-back-studio-mixing-headphones Audio Technica ATH-M50X https://www.audio-technica.com/en-us/ath-m50x HP Thin Client Model T6xx (watch for them on Ebay) https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c06433828 Firefox Phone https://firefoxosdevices.org/en/#type:smartphones|coming-devices:yes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefox_OS Love 2D Gaming Engine https://love2d.org/ Roblox https://www.roblox.com/ Minecraft https://www.minecraft.net/en-us Alpine Linux https://www.alpinelinux.org/ Rick & Morty https://rickandmorty.fandom.com/wiki/Rick_and_Morty_(TV_series) Gravity Falls https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_Falls Final Space https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Space Peter Cushing Dr. Who movies https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Peter_Cushing https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Who_and_the_Daleks https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daleks%27_Invasion_Earth_2150_A.D. Blake's 7 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blake%27s_7 Gorillaz - Clint Eastwood https://youtu.be/1V_xRb0x9aw

Run Into The Ground
030. The Blue Album feat. Nick Tazza

Run Into The Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 117:40


This week we have Nick Tazza of Algernon Cadwallader, Dogs on Acid, and Ape Up! to talk about Weezer's debut The Blue Album. We go really deep on regional punk scenes, what its like to be a Jade Tree recording artist, the Ferret Music office, X-Fest, Radio Shack, the Be Happy house, bringing a step ladder to the house show, spray painting CD-Rs, linkin_Park_P4percut.exe, Andrew's Compaq, Joe Pulito, Misfits cover bands, the 2000 Subway Series, the Ape Up! European tour saga, Weezify, music cruises, drumming influences, Pinkerton, The Rentals, Peter Gowland's album art, Rivers Cuamo, Leaves Cuomo, making sweet love to memories, crossing the Beach Boys with hair metal, writing songs in Excel, and Fat Mike encounters. // Follow us at @danbassini, @mysprocalledlife, and @nicholas.tazza @runintotheground. Listen to our RITG Mixtape Vol. 7 here and our Best of RITG playlist here.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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What the Hell Were You Thinking
Episode 375: A Tandy Company

What the Hell Were You Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 33:03


Show Notes Episode 375: A Tandy Company This week Host Dave Bledsoe throws a tantrum when he cannot find a single ¼ inch to RCA audio patch cable anywhere in Best Buy and has to have several drinks in a nearby dive bar to calm his nerves. (Always some excuse with this guy.) On the show this week we tell the tale of the early tech giant you probably bought your first cell phone from in the early 2000's. (It is Nokia ringtone time!) Along the way we learn that Dave never really fit anywhere as a kid. (Nothing ever changes with this guy) Then we dive right into the history of Radio Shack from their origins as a Boston radio retailer to the rise of the Tandy Company who bought them with money made from assless leather chaps. (To be honest, ALL chaps are assless.) Then we tell you about how Tandy Computers beat out some little fruit based startup in California to become the dominant computer in American homes. (For a little while) Our Sponsor this week is Bert's Battery Barn, if it holds a charge we have it! We open with a Tandy Commercial from their halcyon days and close with Popgun spotting a faded Radio Shack sign on the side of the road. Show Theme: https://www.jamendo.com/track/421668/prelude-to-common-sense The Show on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheHell_Podcast The Show on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whatthehellpodcast/ The Show on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjxP5ywpZ-O7qu_MFkLXQUQ www.whatthehellpodcast.com Give us your money on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/Whatthehellpodcast The Show Line: 347 687 9601 Closing Music: https://youtu.be/cEuZoIlTVvo We are a proud member of the Seltzer Kings Podcast Network! http://seltzerkings.com/ Citations Needed: Tandy Corporation https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences-and-law/economics-business-and-labor/businesses-and-occupations/tandy-corp Inside RadioShack's slow-motion collapse: Why the fall of the 94-year-old electronics chain didn't have to be this way https://financialpost.com/news/retail-marketing/inside-radioshacks-slow-motion-collapse-why-the-fall-of-the-94-year-old-electronics-chain-didnt-have-to-be-this-way Computer Changes In The 1970'S https://www.thepeoplehistory.com/70scomputers.html The Personal Computer That Beat Apple (For a While) https://time.com/3968790/tandy-trs-80-history/ From hero to zero: meteoric rise and fall of Tandy computers https://cybernews.com/editorial/from-hero-to-zero-meteoric-rise-and-fall-of-tandy-computers/ Uncited Additional Reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RadioShack https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tandy_Corporation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_D._Tandy https://www.nytimes.com/1978/11/06/archives/charles-tandy-60-industrialist-started-work-at-12-400-radio-shacks.html https://financialpost.com/news/retail-marketing/inside-radioshacks-slow-motion-collapse-why-the-fall-of-the-94-year-old-electronics-chain-didnt-have-to-be-this-way https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/tandy-charles-david https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_TRS-80_and_Tandy-branded_computers Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Publishing Secrets
Published and Paid #6: 7 Reasons to Consider Creating a Course

Publishing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 19:27


In this episode, you'll also hear:Important questions to ask when considering creating a course Why creating a course is often more profitable, impactful, and helpful than writing booksWhat to keep in mind when turning your book into a courseWhere to get a FREE guide to walk you through the first (very low-risk) steps, plus the opportunity to consult an industry expertBe sure to read all the way to the end for the link to the FREE guide and to connect with course creation expert Kate Nash!The reality is that the publishing industry is constantly changing. More than ever before, it's important to think outside the box when it comes to making a living as a writer. That's where the Published and Paid series comes in. Over the past five episodes, we've been exploring new opportunities and discussing exactly where and how to get the tools you need to succeed. Remember, it all starts in the mind. Once you start thinking differently and using the tips, tricks, and strategies we've been highlighting in this series, you'll be able to publish and profit in a way that honors God. Make Money as a Writer by Creating a Course So far we've covered four paths to make money as a writer: through publishing books, public speaking, coaching programs, and copywriting. Today, we're going to look at another income stream that you've probably benefited from, but that you may not have considered as something you could do to make extra money. That income stream is turning your book – or podcast or blog – into a course. Courses can be extremely profitable, especially if you have expertise in a highly sought-after topic. And thanks to the internet, it's easier than ever to create and sell a course. There are numerous platforms that will host your course and handle all the logistics from registration to payment processing. Best of all, a course can help you make an impact for Christ around the globe.Most of us have taken a course at some point in our lives, whether it was for work or school, and we know how beneficial they can be. So it makes sense that your audience would benefit from you taking the material you've already created and turning it into a course. Now, if you're like the members of our Christian Authors Network community, you probably have some questions, like:What exactly should I put into the course? How do I figure out how much content to include? How do I price my course? Where will I find customers for the course? How in the world do I find the time? What if I put in the work and create the course, and no one wants to learn what I have to share? Those are all fair questions! And some people would say, “Hey, listen, that's just FEAR – False Expectations Appearing Real.” But the reality is that these are questions that need to be addressed. Let's be clear: creating a course comes with its share of challenges, just like anything else that makes a difference in the world. Yes, it will cost you something, and not only a small investment of money – it's also going to take time, effort, and energy. But you may find that the benefits far outweigh the costs. 7 Reasons You Should Create a CourseSo why should you consider creating a course? There are many good reasons, but for now, let's look at seven of them to help you consider this viable and very profitable option. 1. You've already created the content – why not maximize it and share it with more people? Many of us have created a piece of content that we were really proud of, but we knew in our heart that not enough people got to see it. Maybe you self-published a book and didn't have the marketing budget to get it in front of enough eyeballs. Or maybe you wrote this amazing blog post, and it got lost in the sea of the internet. Whatever that content is, if you know it's quality content that helps other people, why not turn it into a course so it can reach a wider audience? These days, online marketplaces like Udemy and Skillshare and course creation tools like Teachable, Thinkific, and Kajabi make it easier than ever to create and launch courses and share your knowledge with more people.2. You can make more money from selling courses than selling books. When it comes to earning potential, there's no question that courses beat out selling books, simply because courses tend to have a higher price point.Imagine you create a course and sell it on the low end at $100 for each person who signs up. If 10 people sign up, you've made $1,000. On the other hand, if you sell a book for $10, you need to generate 100 sales to make that same $1,000 – and that's not even factoring in the extra fees you'll have to pay to ship those books. While you may continue to revise and enhance your course over time, you won't have to pay a fee every time someone signs up for it. That means you retain more of the income that's generated from each sale than you do from book sales. In other words, creating a course takes a little extra effort, but it can be a much more lucrative way to earn money in the long run. 3. Courses are a great way to build authority in your field. When you have authority in your field, people see you as the expert. They believe that you know what you're talking about and that you can show them the way to solve their problems. Of course, publishing books is an effective way to build authority and credibility. But when you create a course, you increase the complexity of what you're able to offer – and also the value. You create the opportunity to put your knowledge and expertise on display for the world to see. Creating a course reinforces that you are an expert in your field, because you're not just writing – you're also teaching others and directly helping them reach their full potential. Now, make no mistake, there is tremendous power in books. But when it comes to credibility and authority, there's a huge difference between being able to write and being able to teach a concept. When you demonstrate that you can transfer knowledge by teaching others, it instantly raises your market value, helping you build a powerful brand and expand your reach.4. By creating a course, you help people learn in a structured, organized way. We are conditioned from a very young age to have information presented to us in a logical, step-by-step format, because that's the easiest method for us to follow and understand what we're being taught. When you create an online course, not only are you earning money through helping people learn, but you're also giving the people who sign up confidence that they can actually put the knowledge to use. People want to have hope that they can make changes. They want to learn concrete skills that will help them change their lives for the better. By creating a course that effectively presents information and the tools for applying it, you offer people a source of hope. 5. Courses give you the opportunity to add multimedia content. People learn in different ways. Some learn best by reading, others by watching videos, and others by listening to audio. Unlike books, courses allow you to accommodate all those different learning styles by providing content in multiple formats. In addition, multimedia content adds another layer of depth and complexity to the information you're presenting. By incorporating visuals, audio, and other forms of media, you can provide a well-rounded understanding of the course material through strategic repetition. Finally, multimedia content helps break up the monotony of an online course to keep students engaged. Let's be honest – we can be distracted from reading something pretty easily, can't we? Incorporating multimedia elements, however, helps draw people back in when they get distracted, increasing engagement and helping ensure they get what they signed up for. 6. Courses allow you to create a community of learnersWhen you create a course, you're not just creating content. You create a community of learners who share a common goal: to improve their skills and up their knowledge in a certain subject area. So when you think about it, creating a course is an opportunity to build something that's much more than just a collection of information. Remember that you're not creating a course for yourself; you're building something for the benefit of other people. You're empowering them to learn at their own pace and giving them the tools they need to succeed. And, just like books, courses have the potential to make a difference long after you are gone. If it's important to you to make a difference in the world, a course may just be the right path for you. You may even find that it's one of the most rewarding things you can do. 7. Course participants are more likely to take action than readers. If you're like most people, you probably have a list of things that you really want to do, learn, or change. But it can be hard to find the time or motivation to actually take action. That's why online courses can be such a great investment – not only do they provide us with the information we need to make a change, but they also provide a level of accountability and structure that is often lacking in our day-to-day lives. When your audience signs up for your online course, they're actually making a commitment to themselves and to their fellow participants that they're going to take action and see results. That's why people who take online courses are often more likely to take action and see results than people who simply read about the same topic. So by creating a course in your area of expertise, you offer your audience the opportunity to make that commitment and start taking action.Remember Your “Why”As you consider converting your work into a course, remember that it's all for the benefit of your audience. God has given you a message and called you to a certain group of people. What if those people are waiting on the next evolution of that message – your course – to guide them across the finish line and get them from where they are now to where they want to be? As an expert in your field, you can be their guide and teacher, helping them navigate the journey. When you write a book, you give people the first step in the process, but then it's up to the reader to do all the rest of the work themselves. But as humans, even when we have great intentions of doing things ourselves, life happens, and we forget or fail to follow through. Your audience might just need you to come alongside them and show them the way, and creating a course is a great way to do that. Turn Your Book into a Course: FREE Guide DownloadNow that you understand the reasons you should at least consider creating a course, it's time to take action. And don't worry – this is a very simple step you can take right now to explore how easy it would be to turn your book, blog, or podcast into a course. Click here to grab a FREE copy of the Turn Your Book into a Course guide by Christian Authors Network approved partner Kate Nash. If you haven't already interacted with Kate in our community, she's an industry expert in course creation. She's developed hundreds of courses taken by more than 250,000 students. She has worked for major players like RadioShack and Publix, and she's been a certified professional in talent development for almost 20 years. And now she dedicates her time to helping authors, writers, and creators like you put together programs that help transform the lives of their clients. In other words, Kate is a course creation genius. With her guide, all you have to do is explore the answers to 10 simple questions, and you will be crystal-clear on your next step. Kate is also the perfect person to answer all of your questions about creating and selling courses, so on that same page where you'll download the Turn Your Book into a Course guide, you can also sign up for a consultation with Kate and get all those questions answered. Even if you're still on the fence about creating a course, this is the perfect opportunity for you to take action with very little risk. Remember, this could be the very thing your audience needs to get the results they are after. So go grab that guide and start exploring your options, and then come back next week for the next installment of Published and Paid.  BIO:My name is Tamara "Coach Tam" Jackson and I am a published author, Facebook© Certified Digital Marketer, host of the Top 100 Publishing Secrets podcast, and founder of The Christian Authors Network (C.A.N.) Facebook© community. I specialize in helping mission-driven authors, coaches, and entrepreneurs increase their exposure, impact, and income through strategic self-publishing and digital media appearances. Just say yes and we will work together to attract a tribe of loyal followers that 1) "get you", 2) love what you do, and 3) are happy to invest in your book, business, cause, or movement. Plus, we will accomplish all of this without fake, salesy, sleazy, or manipulative tactics. Yes you CAN write, publish, and profit in a way that honors God; join the community today at https://christianauthors.net/fbgroup.   GET CONNECTED:Connect with fellow Christian Authors: http://christianauthors.net/fbgroupDownload the Free Christian Author Marketing EBook: https://265point.com/secretsbook1Get Booked as a Guest Speaker for Free: http://christianauthors.netFollow Tam on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TamaraJacksonTransformationExpert/Interact with Tam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitnesstamara265/

The Butcher Shop
EP #25: Hunter Biden laptop leaked?

The Butcher Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 39:45


TIMESTAMPS!1:11 Corinna Kopf makes millions posting basic pics on Onlyfans.10:27 Radio Shack wildin on twitter.13:15 Hunter Biden iCloud gets hacked and show's the true extent of his drug use.-FOLLOW US HERE TO STAY UP TO DATE-https://www.instagram.com/thebutchershoppodcast/https://www.tiktok.com/@thebutchershoppodcasthttps://twitter.com/TBSPODCAST305Support the show

20,000 Leagues Under the Internet
Ep.97 – How to Get Bullied Online

20,000 Leagues Under the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 62:01


Kyle is absent this week so we thought we'd do something a little different; we clean out our notes apps of all the small internet related stories that just don't justify their own episode. With that being said, we cover a lot of news that's happened recently and from far in the past. We address some of the comments on our Jimbly/Nexialist episode, dive into the rollercoaster of a ride that is Jake Novak's TikTok, shed some light on the red bikini of 2017, mourn the loss of the Choco Taco, give some relationship advice and finally talk about what the hell is going on over at RadioShack. Linktree Find out more at http://20kleaguespod.com This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

20,000 Leagues Under the Internet
Ep.96 – Horny Brand Twitter

20,000 Leagues Under the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 66:34


We've all seen brands flirting with their audiences and each other over the years from Wendy's to Duolingo to Pedialyte. Oftentimes the brands doing the flirting make no sense and have no business being horny on main and leads to many awkward moments and slip-ups. It was all fun and games initially with the inclusion of internet slang like "BAE" and "bruh", but things escalated quickly once the COVID-19 pandemic hit and blue balls set in. Audiences turned on company socials screaming "silence, brand!" and "go to horny jail!" culminating in watchdog accounts like "Brands Saying Bae" deriding and making fun of the r/fellowkids energy companies like McDonald's, Virgin America, and Cheetos were giving. We couldn't cover everything in this episode, but Jon and Harland will get to the bottom of the Radio Shack rebrand next week while Kyle is gone, so stick around! Sources: https://www.vulture.com/article/when-brands-got-horny.html[body] Linktree Find out more at http://20kleaguespod.com This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

It Was Murder Podcast
Old Friends Never Die (Bonk Bag Exclusively at Radio Shack)

It Was Murder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 105:50


Maybe our rewritiest episode to date.

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily
Christine “Samsung Ambassador” Quinn

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 54:38


Sold! We're in escrow on Selling Sunset bombshell Christine Quinn's extremely beachy read “How to Be a Boss B*tch” (asterisk her own). From her vague struggles with ADHD to her vague struggles with modeling, marrying into Grubhub to hanging out with the CEO of Radio Shack's daughter, and the bloodless aesthetics of modern wealth—this is a $20 million episode built on a pile of dirt. PLUS! Get the low down and dirty on our trip to Atlantic City—only in the VIP Lounge—coming this Friday. Subscribe here: patreon.com/cbcthepod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.