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Latest podcast episodes about initially

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी
'Tough job': Vikrant Sharma ready to represent thousands of Australian transport workers

SBS Hindi - SBS हिंदी

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 7:25


Vikrant Sharma was only 19 years old when he arrived in Australia as an international student. Initially, he sold door-to-door and washed cars, but his perseverance has led him to become the first Indian-born branch secretary of the Rail, Tram and Bus Union (RTBU). 

The Plywood Podcast
Super Bowl to Nonprofit leader with Malcolm Mitchell

The Plywood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 45:05


Today we are sitting down with Malcolm Mitchell, a Super Bowl Champion turned nonprofit leader who is tackling the issues around illiteracy through his organization, Share the Magic. During his freshman year in college, Malcolm developed a love of reading. Initially, reading was a challenge, however, through perseverance, books became an avenue for expanding his curiosity, creativity, and learning. Malcolm shares his story and challenges throughout his journey."My mother instilled this mentality of open-mindedness... Every human being is important. Everyone has something to offer." - Malcolm Mitchell, Share the Magic FoundationCheck out Malcolm's Work:Share the Magic Foundation - Read with MalcolmThe Magician's Hat by Malcolm MitchellWatch Malcolm's talk at Plywood Presents 2021---Welcome to the Plywood Podcast: Real talk for social entrepreneurs and nonprofit leaders.Plywood is a nonprofit in Atlanta leading a community of startups doing good. Over the past 12 years, we have worked with over 800 startup founders and nonprofit leaders wrestling with the tensions of starting, growing, and sustaining.Think of The Plywood Podcast as a kitchen table conversation debating the pros and woes of running a business and sustaining a nonprofit. We dive into building business plans, sustaining relationships (personal and professional), diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace, forming values while being a part of true cultural change for good, and so much more.Learn more about Plywood at PlywoodPeople.com

Thought Leaders Business Lab Podcast
How Life Experiences Shape Business - Mic Takeover with Danielle Chiel

Thought Leaders Business Lab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:22


Each of us goes through different phases in life. These experiences encourage self-reflection and help us better understand what others endure. In this episode, Danielle Chiel takes over the mic and interviews Samantha about how life experiences shape business. For full show notes, links and transcription visit: https://samanthariley.global/podcast/379/ ABOUT DANIELLE CHIEL At the age of 10, Danielle was taught to knit by her grandmother, Pearl, and instantly fell in love with it. After a career in teaching and a Ph.D. in musicology, Danielle returned to this love, opening a fashion store specialising in hand knits. Initially, locals knitted for her, but industrial changes sent her offshore. Refusing to use established mass-production practices, she travelled to India to find another solution. Once there she worked with women in Tamil Nadu to establish her first knitting hub and KOCO was born. WHERE TO FIND DANIELLE CHIEL Website: https://koco.global/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniellechiel/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/knitonechangeone/ CONNECT WITH SAMANTHA RILEY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/samriley/ Instagram: @thesamriley LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samriley/

Veterans Chronicles
Sgt. Terry Bucklew, U.S. Army, Vietnam

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 42:55


Terry Bucklew was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Initially trained in communications, Bucklew accepted many different assignments on his lengthy deployment to Vietnam - from field wireman to door gunner to running night ambushes.In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles", Bucklew offers his raw history of service in Vietnam, including how he woke up inside a body bag and his frustrations with the rules of engagement, which Bucklew says prevented a decisive U.S. victory.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Set Up a Smooth Agency Acquisition Without an Earnout

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 33:11


Are you planning to sell your agency at some point in the future? How are you preparing to make the process easier for yourself and your team? Our guest for this episode created a lifestyle business that allowed her to lead the life she wanted. When she decided to sell, she realized the business was already set up to work without her, which made for a pretty seamless selling process when the time for an acquisition came along Jodie Cook is an entrepreneur, writer, and athlete who started as a freelance social media manager. She created and successfully ran her social media agency, JC Social Media, for ten years -- even growing it during the pandemic. She's sharing the story of how she grew her agency and sold it, without an earnout, in 2021. In this episode, we'll discuss: Why she decided to sell her lifestyle business. How she prepared for the selling process. Why you should hire a broker. Sponsors and Resources E2M Solutions: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by E2M Solutions. E2M is a web design and development agency that has provided white label services for the past 10 years to agencies all over the world. Check out e2msolutions.com/smartagency and get 10% off for the first three months of service. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Building and Growing Her Agency As often happens with agency owners, Jodie started as a freelancer and went on to create her agency once she had too much work to handle on her own. To promote services, she went to networking events telling people she was a social media manager until she got a few clients. After a while, she got to a point where she had a full-time job worth of work for herself and could choose between continuing as a freelancer or building a team. As for hiring, Jodie says she stuck to hiring other social media managers. It was a role she knew and could evaluate and train for and as a result, she developed a successful training process. However, she also sees her agency could only ever grow as far as her own knowledge would allow. And in hindsight, it would've made sense to scale by hiring for roles that are not her strength. Setting Up a Lifestyle Business Agency owners get into the business for various reasons but at some point, we can all expect to have some degree of freedom. Jodie found herself as the owner of a big agency where everything relied on her and didn't feel happy. This is when she did something that would change her life and her agency. She created a document with four columns where each column represented a step for how the business would start to change to a lifestyle business that could run without her. This was a very important exercise that would later allow her to be better prepared for a sale later on. The four columns contained: Every single process that happened at the agency Who was in charge of every task (at that moment, it was pretty much all her) Who would be in charge in the future (either by getting promoted or looking for a new hire) Her plan (actions she needed to take and even dates) Growing the Agency Through the Pandemic and Beyond Back in March 2020, just as the world changed with the pandemic, Jodie had been running her agency as a lifestyle business. She usually traveled for a couple of months of the year and the business ran very well. She was no longer needed there all the time for things to work correctly. This all came crashing down with the start of the pandemic. Clients in the hospitality and travel sectors were suddenly out of business and the agency shrunk by about 25% in one week. The shift meant Jodie got back to being very much involved in the business. Initially, she tried to figure out how to make a shift in the changing economy. This included a decision on whether or not to lay off part of her 16-member team. After a team meeting, they decided to carry on, secure the clients they still had, and work to look for new clients. The agency offered online webinars, replacing all their in-person events, and started to build the business back up. They not only managed to get back to where the business was before March 2020, they actually grew past it. Preparing to Sell a Social Media Agency With the agency back on track, Jodie asked herself what was next. She could easily go back to having a lifestyle business, but she really didn't want to be pulled back by another emergency like this one. So she made the decision to sell in August 2020. Once she got intentional about an acquisition, Jodie started to reach out to people that knew more about the subject and could point her in the right direction. The key is not discussing an agency sale with your team and just having a small group of trusted people who can help you navigate the process. Keeping it quiet until you have signed agreements saves you from hearsay and speculation by your clients and team. She eventually started working with a broker who clarified how to prepare for the sale process. Basically, it entailed setting up processes, a second tear management team, and documentation. Jodie was relieved to see most of this was already in place because of how she set up the agency to begin with. This gave her the opportunity to sell faster and be comfortable meeting with potential acquirers. She wasn't selling in a desperate moment, loved her team, and actually raved about them so it was genuinely easy to convince buyers how great her agency was. Furthermore, this helped her feel more like she was interviewing the buyers instead of them interviewing her. Successful Interviews with Potential Buyers When discussing either a sale like this or even interviewing prospective clients, you want to feel in control. The person who is more eager to speak and prove themselves has lost control of the meeting. A possible buyer might even think you have something to hide if you seem too anxious. As Jason advises, you want them to speak first because whoever speaks last is now in control of the meeting. Also, this way you can listen to them talk about their agencies and their plans for the future. Jodie listened to potential buyers first and then offered relevant information about the agency. If she had spoken first, she would probably go on tangents that didn't really matter to them, which could ruin the meeting entirely. Letting the potential acquirer speak first also gives you time to evaluate them to see if their agency is a good fit with yours. Remember, culture fit is one of the most important aspects of a successful acquisition. Selling Your Agency Without an Earnout All in all, the purchase process took six months, which is pretty quick for this type of transaction. There were two months of meetings with potential buyers. This was followed by two months of heads of terms with three of them, and then two more months of due diligence. Initially, the three offers they got included an earnout and tied the purchase of the business to Jodie's role in earnout period. Basically, they wanted her to take care of the team and sales which would get her more involved in the business rather than stepping away, which was the goal. Ultimately, she was able to convince the buyers against the earnout. Clients tend to grow attached to agency owners in the sales process and they only want to deal with them. They agreed to have no earnout and the handover process took two weeks. It takes a lot of confidence to get the deal you feel is best for you. Don't be scared into accepting the first offer-- have a number in mind before negotiations begin and be prepared to wait for it. Is it Important to Get an M&A Broker? Jodie did consider handling the sale by herself. If you commit to learning everything you need to learn for this process, it may be the best course for you and your agency. However, looking at the hours she would have to invest into this each day (at least 10 or 12) she decided labor would be best put into continuing to grow her agency. She opted to look for and hire a broker. If you're working with a broker, remember they are incentivized to get you a sale but not necessarily to get you the best possible deal. Sometimes brokers won't educate you on whether you could be making a better deal, so remember to learn as much as you can about the process. Have the confidence to say no and wait for a better offer. It will save you a lot of regrets. When looking to hire a broker, Jodie discovered many don't charge based on the completion of the sale. They charge a monthly fee and hence they may not necessarily be as invested in selling your agency. Because of this, she made sure to ask for completion rates and chose someone with a very high completion rate. Jason also recommends using a broker that charges an upfront fee, another fee once you get to the LOI, and a percentage of the exit. No recurring fee. This means they have more skin in the game are more invested in selling your agency. Life After Selling Your Agency Life after your agency's sale could be more difficult to adapt to than you imagine. A lot of agency owners feel depressed and purposeless after selling their life's work, and it's understandable. Your "why" for selling should be very clear from the beginning. Additionally, you should start planning for your post-sale life and have other projects in mind so you can find your new purpose. Jodie visualized the sale and had in mind the exact amount she wanted from the sale. She also had plans to travel and start a new stage of her life. It looked slightly different than she had planned, as it was still the middle of the COVID restriction. However, she took the time to figure things out and even wrote a book, Ten Year Career. Niching Down to Be a  Successful Social Media Agency When she first started her agency in 2011 she says it was still possible to be a general social media agency. That is something she would change if starting an agency today. “I don't believe you can be a general social media agency. I believe you have to have a niche,” she says. She would choose a vertical and horizontal niche. Then her agency would be experts in a specific space like Instagram for restaurants or TikTok for dentists. Want the Support of Amazing Digital Agency Owners? Do you want to be around amazing agency owners that can see you may not be able to see and help you grow your agency? Then go to the Digital Agency Elite to learn all about our exclusive mastermind.

Unstuck | Mindset Coaching For Women
What's Really Keeping You From Putting Yourself Out There

Unstuck | Mindset Coaching For Women

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 33:54


You love what you do in your business…who you help, and how you help them, but there's just one thing you're still dealing with…putting yourself out there. Sharing about what you do, showing up consistently, building an online presence. You know you need to do these things to have the business you want to have but you're also feeling a block towards it. It feels scary, hard, or just not appealing at all. If this sounds like you, then you may be battling a fear of visibility. In this episode, I'm going to break down what it means to have a fear of visibility and how you can move through it to show up for your business. “Just give it a try and see what happens when you move past that fear and do the thing.” - Shawn Mynar “When something doesn't feel the way you want it to feel, you have the power to shift that too.” - Shawn Mynar “You are the CEO of your business, and you're the CEO of your mind.” - Shawn Mynar FULL TRANSCRIPT BELOW: (please note, transcripts are auto-generated so you can expect errors in grammar, punctuation, and spelling) 0:00 Do you love what you do in your business, you know, who you help and how you help them. But there's just one thing, you're still dealing with putting yourself out there, sharing about what you do showing up consistently building an online presence. You know, you need to do these things to have the business you want to have, but you're also feeling a block towards it, it feels scary, hard, or just not really that appealing. If this sounds like you, then you may be battling a fear of visibility. In this episode, I'm going to break down what it means to have a fear of visibility, and how you can move through it to really start showing up for your business. Let's dive in. Hey, hey there, friends, and welcome back to the unstuck entrepreneur podcast. So, so grateful to have you checking out this episode, and all the other episodes that are calling to you, as I put them out every single week, just for you, it means so much to have you supporting this show. Now, this episode, we're taking it back to my mindset roots. And I'm just really want to have an episode to give you some encouragement, and advice on a specific fear that I think quite a few of you are dealing with, especially as a new business owner. So most of you know by now that I love talking business strategy. And we've had quite a few episodes over the past few weeks, really talking about that strategy. But I love even more talking about the mindset and energy shifts that are required for your business. Because really the strategy, the stuff that's really fun to talk about that a lot of business coaches do talk about a lot. That doesn't mean anything, if you aren't, mentally and energetically ready, and showing up in that way, as a business owner. So that's what we're gonna work on today. And really talking about a fear, like a specific fear that I haven't talked about yet on the show. And really what if I think about it, I really think that this fear is kind of at the crux of a lot of the other fears that we have as business owners, and that we've talked about here on the show. Like if I really boil it down, if you really think about it, I think this one is kind of it in a lot of ways. So that's what we're going to chat about today, starting with a quote from Theodore Roosevelt, it is hard to fail. But it is worse to never have tried to succeed. If I really think about my journey to where I'm at today, and now being almost 10 years into my business. I think this is really summing up how I approached my business this entire time, it is hard to fail. Yes, of course, no one wants to go there. No one wants to experience that. But it is worse to never have tried to succeed. And like think about that, what would it be like to go through your entire life or even spend the next year or the next six months, stalled out and not doing what you really want to be doing? And not achieving the success that could be right there for you. It could literally be one more door that you have to open. But never experiencing that because you're too afraid to fail, or in this case, what we're going to talk about today, you're too afraid to show up, you're too afraid to be seen. And do you really want to continue down that road? And 4:05 do you want to look back? I don't know why. But this is always something that is so clear in my mind, and really is what drives me forward basically every day. Do you really want to look back a year from now or 10 years from now or 20 years from now or on your deathbed and know you never tried and know that you got so caught up in what could happen and all the negative things that could go down that you never tried to succeed? No one wants that. I certainly don't. And like I said, this is really what has been driving me my entire business now almost 10 years down the road. And so I thought this was a perfect quote to share with you today as we move into talking about the fear of visibility. Like I said, I think this is something that is plaguing a lot of business owners, all business owners, but especially the ones that are just getting started, which I know is a lot of you listening today. It's this fear of visibility, like I mentioned, but we can also call it the fear of being seen the fear of putting yourself out there the fear of showing up. And this really showcases itself a lot, especially today, in building an online presence, which is becoming more and more and more important, pretty much by the day, as a business owner and any business owner, it does not have to just be someone who wants an online business these days, it is all businesses, they need to have an online presence. And so like for instance, even if you are a gym owner, and you have a gym, or you have a practice where you see clients or patients, one on one in your brick and mortar place, you still need an online component of your business, you need a website, you need a social media presence. This is how people find you these days, even if they are local people, they are still going on to Google, they're still going on to social media to find you. So we all let's just do this blanket statement, I'm willing to go there. With this blanket statement, we all need an online presence. For instance, today, I was just looking for a new place to go get an oil change for my specific car, it has to be a specific place for my specific car. So I went on to Google, and I found a place and then I went onto their website to learn more about them. And yet, it wasn't a great website. You know, they're a car shop. So probably not going to be something that they really put a whole lot of money or time into to getting this beautiful, amazing interactive website. But it was enough for me to know what they do to know what they stand for, to know their values and to know they're gonna take care of my car. And we all need that, whether you want to have an online business, or you have a physical business, I got on a tangent there. But I think that's important, because we all just need to wrap our heads around the fact that we have to show up online on a regular consistent basis. Okay, so now that we've got that out of the way, then we can start to understand where this fear of visible ability comes up. Because the online presence, the online space, is becoming even more important, which means and you know, especially if you're someone who has a service based business, then your face needs to be shown now, does that mean that your face has to be plastered all over everything for you to have a service based business? No, but you are the brand, it is your business as a service based business, you are the business. So no, you don't have to go show up with your face every single day all over the place. Because I know that's a big block for a lot of people, but you are the face of your business. And with that, and with the ever growing importance of having an online presence for your business, there is even more of a fear of visibility of being seen. 8:38 And it's just adding another layer of resistance for you to get through in order to have the business that you want to have. Because now not only do we have this deep seated fear of visibility, which I'll go over where that came from. But we now we also have to really put ourselves kind of on this stage in a way to have the presence that we need to have in order to have the business we want to have. So it's really amplified at this point. And we'll continue to go that way as obviously, online things and social media things and website things and all the others these other places that we have to show up to have a business as that continues to grow and expand. So will our need to show up in those places, which then can create even more blocks and resistance if you still are dealing with this fear. So how it is going to show up it really stems from this place of being afraid of not being liked. Being afraid of being rejected. Being afraid of being made fun of a failing in front of people of making a mistake in front of people, a fear of being judged a fear of being talked about behind your back. And in a lot of ways, like I said, this is really at the crux for so many other things that we're dealing with. As a business owner when we talk about the mindset work that we have to do, because it can come across as impostor syndrome, as procrastination as perfectionism, as you know, the person that takes all the business courses and just as constantly learning how to do the strategy of business, but then never doing anything with that, I see that a lot. And that's why I'm so adamant about talking about this mindset and energy work, because you're just going to be wasting a ton of money over and over and over again, as you continue to learn all the strategy, but then never do anything with it. Because of what we're going to talk about today. It could look like stalling, wavering in what you want to do with your business and how you want it to look and where you want it to go, you know, bringing up all these questions. That's really kind of the stall tactic. It can look like a lack of confidence, and clarity. There's so many ways, so many blocks that we have when it comes down to our business. That really, if we peel back the layers of the onion, like I talked about is necessary. As part of this mindset work. As we peel back those layers. It comes down to this fear of visibility, which like I said, encompasses that not being liked the fear of rejection, being made fun of failing, making a mistake, that all falls under this fear of visibility. And I think now we just need to all agree that we probably have this to some degree. I mean, how possibly can you get through all of your adolescent years, all of your teenage years, without developing a fear of visibility at this point, 12:11 I truly don't know if that is even possible. Because as I'm sure you can guess, this fear of visibility starts from a very young age, most likely, it stems from most likely a time when you were made fun of maybe in school or with your friends or with your family members, you're made fun of you were laughed at you were bullied, you were called on and you got the wrong answer, and everyone was looking at you. And I can bet that most of us can think back to a time when we were young where that happened. Maybe you were bullied. And now that has really been stuck in your memory, maybe you got called on and you made a fool of yourself in front of the entire class. Or maybe you did get laughed at in the middle of the cafeteria, when you dropped your food, you know, like all of those possible scenarios would be the start of a fear of visibility. Because when that event happened, you had an emotion that was triggered, that didn't feel good, or probably really sucked, you were embarrassed. You were ashamed. You got hot and sweaty, and you just wanted to crawl into a hole and never see anyone again. Probably a lot of us have been there. And you know, I'll tell you my truth. This is just being totally honest with you guys. My fear of visibility, it still shows up today. And it specifically shows up. I am very aware of this. It shows up when I'm on other people's zoom calls with a group of strangers. And I get this fear of speaking in front of them of like, I might say the wrong thing I might mess up. I might fumble my words. I might have a question that is totally dumb. And so it manifests in me not speaking up not asking a question if I have it, not sharing something that I think would be relevant because I'm afraid it won't be relevant. This still happens to me today. And as a lot of you know, I have led at this point, hundreds of my own zoom calls where I'm the one talking on the Zoom call, basically the entire time. I've done at least now over a dozen webinars with hundreds of people on live. Obviously I show up every day, in my business, online on social media all All over the place, I have this podcast, I've been podcasting for over seven years now, I have a blog, I've had that for 10 years, I have no problem with any of this. But I get on to someone else's call, where I'm not the expert on that topic, I don't really know for sure what I'm talking about, obviously, usually I'm there to learn. And I go back to that place where I'm in school. And I get called on and say the wrong thing, and get laughed at. They happened, it happened to me. And I know, there's probably so many more situations where that was my experience. And it made me very shy, it made me very reserved. And then you know, going through and getting into my high school years, I was able to become less shy and reserved, which was great. But then I got into the trap of just wanting to be liked and wanting to fit in, and not giving myself or allowing myself to find my own kind of path. My own expression of who I really was, I basically just tried to blend in. And I share this because I think a lot of you can relate. I mean, I know for a fact, when I do host zoom meetings, there are definitely people who are afraid to be visible, afraid to show up afraid to share, afraid to ask questions. And that is totally understandable. And of course, I 16:32 don't push them to, if that's not something that's comfortable for them. So just know that in other situations where it's not my call, I am that person. And so I totally can relate and I totally get it. And I want you to know, and I have made sure that I know for myself, that it is natural to have those thoughts, and feelings and to have them still show up as an adult, because you haven't done any work to separate the two or to acknowledge what's going on or to find your power in this situation. And we'll talk about that coming up. And for me, I've done the work to find this empowerment when it comes to my business and showing up for my business. And I'll share how I did that. But have I done that yet for my personal life for when I am on in these situations where I find this fear of visibility coming up? Not yet. Nope. And that's why I still am dealing with it. So I guess also a reminder that it can be it will show up in different places, I guess. And it can be something and will be something that you have to work on in separate situations of your life. It's not something that all of a sudden is just gone. Once you do decide to show up in your business, or once you do decide to show up on other people's zoom calls, or whatever it is. It's something that needs to take place, often and consistently and in different areas of your life. Now, how did I get to the point where I don't feel this way? In my business, I don't have any nervousness when I do start my Zoom calls, or I'm on webinars, nothing like that. I'm very confident. I'm very clear. I'm excited. I love doing webinars, especially live ones, believe it or not, I love it. And how did I get there? Because if you would have told me that this is what I was going to be doing. You know, back in my high school days, I would have thought you were absolutely crazy. There is no way I would be able to do such a thing and to be in front of hundreds of people live and openly sharing and talking and discussing and teaching and all this stuff without these fears. So what did I do? And here's the honest truth. And I know as soon as I say it, you're all going to grow and and be like Oh, of course she's talking about this again. But we've got to really get this point ingrained in all of you so that you can start doing it too. Here's what I did. 19:24 I showed up scared. I had these fears. Initially. All of this same stuff came up as I was hitting publish on my first blog post which I will never forget how nerve racking that was when I did send off my first email newsletter to my list. When I did post on social media for the first time. I had those fears of being visible of being seen of being made fun of of being judged. I had all that, and I still had it after my second, my third, my fourth, my 10th, my 20th post. But then it dissipated, it dissolved. Because the thing that I was afraid of happening, didn't happen. In fact, the opposite happened. Instead of getting made fun of or getting laughed at or being judged, I was getting messages of praise for my work, and of gratitude for how I was helping people. And when that happened, that proved my fear wrong, that was my way of proving my fear wrong, which if you've listened to the show for a while, then you know, that is my number one tip, and tool and tactic to help you get over your fears is to prove it wrong. And so do you have a case in the past that you can reference about when that fear didn't actually happen? Or can you do the thing and realize you're still okay? Realize it didn't come to fruition, or realize that maybe it didn't, it wasn't that bad. And it's something that you can live with, in order to reach your goals. And that's the case for my situation. By putting myself and my work out there. Even when I was scared, I was able to see, I was able to realize that it's not always the case that if I put myself out there, I will be made fun of or judged or laughed at, there's actually another thing that could happen, that will most likely happen more often happen. And it's one that feels really good, knowing you're helping someone else, knowing people are really valuing your work. That feels pretty amazing. And so amazing that it was worth the risk of occasionally, you know, getting judged in order to help that other person in order to be there. And to provide this work. That was actually really reaching the right people. And of course, that's not to say that I've never gotten hate or complaints, or bad reviews or all that stuff. It's just part of having an online presence. So just know, right here right now, you will get the haters, they are literally out there. And they've made it their full time job to spread hate of people that they don't even know. So just, that's helpful. I think once I realized that that was going to happen regardless, and now I can tell you, so you know that and you can be prepared because it's going to happen. And yeah, that happens. And I would be lying. If I tried to say that it doesn't affect me whatsoever. That little voice still comes back in. But it is so much weaker. Now it doesn't have a, an emotional vibration to it. It's just like that voice that then because it's so weak, I can easily make that shift, to decide not to give it that energy, give it that power. And I can move on. And this is all stuff that happened with time that happened by continuing to face my fears, and do it anyway, so that I could prove that voice wrong. And in that process, not only am I proving the voice wrong, proving those stories or beliefs wrong, but I'm also finding other truths that are way more valuable. And way more important. In this case, it 24:04 was Oh, when I put myself out there and share my work. I get praise and I get gratitude for doing the work that I do. And so that became my story that became my truth. And it got easier and easier. And that's why you see happen so often with those of you listening, who are new business owners, and did take the leap to put your work out there, even though it was scary. And this is the case for pretty much all of us. Sure there are people who don't have this fear of visibility, aren't worried or scared about any of this. And they can just easily put themselves out there and not think twice about it. But most of us are in this category that when we start it feels uncomfortable and it feels scary. But those of you who have done it who have faced the fear And did it anyway, what I see in you is the same thing that happened to me, that response dissipates, that fear dissolves, and you are really able to show up in the way that you want to for your business much quicker than you would expect. Because you have just taken that initial scary step to prove your fear wrong. So that's the first thing. And I, as I said, I know you guys are like, Yeah, of course, you say that all the time. But it's just hard, I just want you to give it a try. Just give it a try and see what happens when you move past that fear, and, and do the thing. And then there's one other thing that I just want you to try on, I want you to remember, and especially when you are in those moments, see what happens when you come back to this idea. So you have a situation, and then you have the response to the situation. So there's an event that happened. And then there's this emotion or this feeling and these thoughts that came up in you, because of that event that happened. And a lot of times in our minds in our bodies, we continue to think that they are one in the same this thing happens. And then this is how I feel, this is what I think this is what I experience. But in all actuality, they are two completely separate things. There's the event, and then there's your response to that event. One, you don't have any control over, and one you have complete control over. So you can't change that event that happened, that thing that happened happened, you can't change that, and events will continue to happen, that are going to happen regardless. But you do have the power over the response you have towards that event. And that's the case for everything that happens in your life, there is an event and there is the response. And the response is really your emotion, your feeling, and the thoughts that come up because of that event. But they are two different things. And you can separate them so that those events don't trigger that response in you. And especially when it comes to business and moving forward in your business, when you know that you are the one that has a say in how you respond to an event, then you feel a lot more powerful. As I mentioned, if I would have had haters back, you know it 10 years ago, I would have responded a lot different than how I do now because I have taken control over the response to that event and haters are going to happen. But my response has changed because I'm the one in charge of that response. So bring your power back to you and do what you can to take charge of your responses. And when it comes to your business, you have the power to change that response in all of the events that happen. You get to choose how it feels to you what words you say to yourself when it happens. And guess what, when something doesn't feel the way you want it to feel. You have the power to shift that emotion to. 28:58 So really all this to say you're in charge. Let's get back to remembering who's in charge here. Yes, you are the CEO of your business, but you're also the CEO of your mind. So let's remember that these events don't have to hurt. They don't have to be scary. They don't have to be hard. You have the tools to move through and calm that emotion, calm that feeling calm those thoughts. You get to decide you have the power. And so if you're someone who has been working with this fear of visibility, maybe it's something that you didn't even know was happening until today. Totally fine. Regardless, I see you and yes, the pun is intended there. I see you with your fear of visibility, but I know how it feels I've been there. There are still parts of my my own mindset that I'm working through this fear of visibility, that's normal, that's okay. But I don't want you to not try for success because of this fear, to not go after what you really want, because of this fear. And I don't want you to because now we know that you're in charge of that. These are two separate things, you can put yourself out there. And it cannot be scary, because you are the one in charge of how that feels of how you take that situation on. So what can you do to move past that, to shift it to dissolve it? And like I said, like, I will always say, one of the best ways of all time, is to do it anyway, is to push through and do it because as soon as you do it, he'll realize, in most cases, it's like, and I'm talking like 99.999% of cases. It's not what you thought it was going to be, what you thought was going to happen, didn't happen, and won't happen, and then it dissipates. But one thing I know for sure, for every single one of you listening is that you have too much to share with this world to just continue keeping it to yourself. It is time to show up as the you that you are, shine your light. Share your gifts, share your knowledge, share your experience, so that you can help others in the way that you're meant to. I encourage you just to show up and be yourself and see what happens. I promise. It's not as scary as it sounds. All right. I will leave you with that my friends, and until next time, take care Transcribed by https://otter.ai  

The Daily Gardener
May 18, 2022 Tsar Nicholas II, Ralph Waldo Emerson, W. G. Sebald, Mary McLeod Bethune, The Medicinal Forest Garden Handbook by Anne Stobart, and Mount St. Helens

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 17:44


  Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1868 Birth of Tsar Nicholas II (books about this person), the last Emperor of Russia, King of Congress Poland, and Grand Duke of Finland, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his abdication on 15 March 1917. On his fiftieth birthday on this day in 1918, he was essentially under house arrest by the Bolsheviks along with the rest of his family, the Romanovs (books about this family), in Yekaterinburg "Yek-ah-teerin- borg" (the fourth largest city in Russia) in a private home called Ipatiev ("ee-pah-tee-iv") or the "House of Special Purpose." It would be Nicholas's last birthday. In June, he wrote in his diary "It was unbearable to sit that way, locked up, and not be in a position to go out into the garden when you wanted and spend a fine evening outside." That same month, his wife, Alexandra, wrote, "Out in the garden, fearfully hot, sat under the bushes. They have given us. . . half an hour more for being out. Heat, airlessness in the rooms intense." By the 23rd of June, Alexandra noted the wonder of breathing in the fresh summer air. She wrote, Two of the soldiers came and took out one window in our room. Such joy, delicious air at last, and one window no longer whitewashed. The air in the room became clean and by evening, cool. Nicholas observed, The fragrance from all the town's gardens is amazing. This moment would be one of the family's last happy times.   On July 17, 1918, the entire family, including their children and most faithful servants, were brought to the basement and executed. Today there is nothing left of the Ipatiev house. It was demolished in September of 1977, and the land was given to the Russian Orthodox Church. The altar inside a church called the Church on the Blood is on the very spot where the Romanovs died. The beautiful church honors Nicholas and his family, now regarded as saints in the Russian Orthodox Church.   1926 On this day, Ralph Waldo Emerson (books by this author) wrote in his journal: My garden is an honest place.  Every tree and every vine are incapable of concealment and tell after two or three months exactly what sort of treatment they have had.  The sower may mistake and sow his peas crookedly: the peas make no mistake, but come up and show his line.   1944 Birth of Winfried Georg Sebald ("Say-bald") (books by this author), who went by Max and wrote as W. G. Sebald, German writer and academic. When Max died at 57, he was regarded as one of the greatest authors of his time. His 2001 novel Austerlitz was Sebald's final novel. The book was honored with the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 2019, it ranked 5th on The Guardian's list of the 100 best books of the 21st century. Here's an excerpt: In the warmer months of the year, one or other of those nocturnal insects quite often strays indoors from the small garden behind my house. When I get up early in the morning, I find them clinging to the wall, motionless. I believe, said Austerlitz, they know they have lost their way since if you do not put them out again carefully, they will stay where they are, never moving, until the last breath is out of their bodies. Indeed they will remain in the place where they came to grief even after death, held fast by the tiny claws that stiffened in their last agony until a draft of air detaches them and blows them into a dusty corner.  Sometimes, seeing one of these moths that have met their end in my house, I wonder what kind of fear and pain they feel while they are lost.   1955 Death of Mary McLeod Bethune (books about this person), American educator, philanthropist, humanitarian, womanist, and civil rights activist. Mary was the fifteenth child - and the first baby born free - to her newly freed parents, who were enslaved before the Civil War and owned by a different master. Mary's father, Samuel, had worked to "buy" his bride. Most of Mary's older brothers and sisters were sold to other masters. Mary was also the first person in her family to go to school. In 1904, Mary moved to Daytona, Florida. There, she created the Daytona Literary and Industrial School for Training Negro Girls, and within two years, she had 250 students. Without any means, Mary improvised and used sticks of charcoal for pencils, mashed elderberries for ink, and cardboard boxes for tables and chairs.  Mary put fifteen dollars in pennies, nickels, and dimes down on a swampy piece of land that served as a garbage dump. It was called Hell's Hole. With the help of benefactors, Mary built a four-story building on the site. Over the main doors were the words "Enter to Learn," and looking up over the same doors upon leaving, students saw the words "Depart to Serve." Mary's school continued to grow until it merged with an all-boys school and became Bethune-Cookman College (B-CC). As the school's first president, Mary reflected, When I walk through the campus, with its stately palms and well-kept lawns, and think back to the dump-heap foundation, rub my eyes and pinch myself. And I remember my childish visions in the cotton fields. Mary became a nationally known speaker, and she often spoke of a people garden, a place where people of all colors grew together in harmony. Initially, Mary was disheartened that there was no black blossom to represent her race and make her people's garden complete. But that all changed when she discovered black flowers in gardens during a visit to Europe. During her visit to Holland, Mary received black tulip bulbs. And after she saw a garden with black roses In Switzerland,  she ordered 72 black roses for the grounds at B-CC. The gesture earned Mary a nickname: the black rose. In turn, Mary called her B-CC students her "Black Roses." On this day in 1955, Mary died of a heart attack. Her will ended with this goodbye: I leave you love. I leave you hope. I leave you racial dignity...   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Medicinal Forest Garden Handbook by Anne Stobart  This book came out in 2020, and the subtitle is Growing, Harvesting, and Using Healing Trees and Shrubs in a Temperate Climate. This book has tons of practical information on using medicinal trees and shrubs for your own self-sufficiency or for-profit - and it's a fantastic book. Before I get into this review, you should know that Anne has tons of direct experience creating her own medicinal forest in England. And she regularly uses herbal medicine in her practice. What's especially exciting about the way Anne has written this book is she is giving us advice for all kinds of spaces, whether you're looking at small gardens or small properties, all the way up to agroforestry. There is so much in this book. Anne reviews her favorite medicinal trees and offers practical advice on incorporating those into your landscape. She shares the kind of shrubs you should consider if you're interested in medicinal plants. She also reveals how to combine woody and other layers of medicinal plants to look good and make sense with other projects that you may have on your property. And Anne also takes us on a deep dive into some of the main medicinal constituents of woody plants and the latest research. You don't always see this information together in one complete guide. Usually, there are drips and drabs in other books. But what I love about what Anne has done is she's put it all together here - All the information you need to make informed decisions about the medicinal trees and shrubs you want to plant on your property. Now, Anne herself points out that many books on forest gardens focus primarily on food. So to have a book that talks about medicinal forest gardens is especially unique and valuable. And so, what Anne is doing here is sharing her wisdom when it comes to harvesting so that you can create your own herbal remedies. And here's what Anne wrote in the foreword to her book. I love herbs and am especially passionate about medicinal trees and shrubs. This book is not only about how you can cultivate and harvest them, but it is also intended to provide you with the basis for creating your own medicinal planting design and herbal preparations. The medicinal forest garden provides a way to grow and harvest healing plants that draw on natural and sustainable processes to make efficient use of resources of light, space, soil, and water. At a time when forests are regarded as key in combatting climate breakdown, what could be better than seizing the opportunity to promote health and biodiversity by planting more medicinal trees and shrubs!   And speaking for myself, I can say that I've had a few takeaways after reading Anne's book. I'm installing a mini orchard up at the cabin, and I'm also supplementing my old-growth forest all around the border of my property. And I definitely took some of Anne's tree and shrub recommendations, and I'm incorporating them into my garden plan for this summer. Anyway, I love this whole field. I also appreciate this area of using plants, not only for their ornamental or food value but also for their medicinal value, which was a key driver for the early plant explorers. And so, I think it's excellent to reclaim some of that knowledge. This book is 288 pages of a ton of information. It's broken into two parts. Part One has detailed information on the medicinal applications you can get from trees and shrubs, including designing, growing, harvesting, and creating remedies. And then Part Two gives you a fabulous directory of forty medicinal trees and shrubs. And I bet there will at least be a handful that you'll want to add to your garden in the future.  You can get a copy of The Medicinal Forest Garden Handbook by Anne Stobart and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $20.   Botanic Spark 1980 On this day, Mount St. Helens erupted.  The deadly eruption triggered the largest landslide ever recorded.  The Honey Market News reported on the impact on bees and local apiaries: The true impact on honeybees from volcanic ash fallout will take a long time to assess...  The Columbia Basin bees died within hours of ash fallout from the St. Helens' eruption on May 18.  The second eruption on May 25 caused great stress in the hives in Southwestern Washington. Brood was pushed out, and colonies with new queens introduced 1-2 days prior to the eruptions were killed.  Central Washington bees took 3-4 days to die or remove brood from the hives. Bees were affected by ash collecting in the respiratory system, resulting in suffocation or the abrasive action on the body and internal organs, causing loss of moisture and eventual death. Early estimates indicate approximately 12,000 colonies have been affected.  Beekeepers were moving colonies out of ash fallout areas. Growers and beekeepers were discussing the availability of bees to pollinate seed crops in the Columbia Basin. Nectar flow had stopped, and heavy syrup feeding was underway.  Beeswax cannot be used... because of the abrasive ash residue that can't be removed. ...Bees avoided foraging on anything that was covered by ash fallout. Yet they would go to blossom that had opened since May 19.    Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

After the Orgy
Mini-sode: The Tokenization of Everything ft. Meta-Nomad

After the Orgy

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 46:11


Meta-Nomad, the host of another one of my favorite podcasts, Hermitix, and I talk about cyclical backlashes, the frontiersmen of the Metaverse, walking the walk, and the importance of starting a garden.  I cut this one a little short because towards the end, it got a little inside baseball and we went on a long tangent about a specific book. Initially, I was planning on this being released in written format, but was pleasantly surprised that the audio quality wasn't too too bad. Theme: Telekon by Gary NumanListen to Hermitix here.

Our Friendly World with Fawn and Matt
The Gossipy Friend, how Twitter has destroyed our bond with one button; why friendship is so important and can save our society, especially right at this moment in time.

Our Friendly World with Fawn and Matt

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:06


Sharing stories is the key to bonding. We explain the difference between sharing and telling a story. Then we get to the bad sharing which is another kind of storytelling/sharing (gossip) that destroys our bond, and we use Twitter as an example of how our society has lost the ability to connect. In this episode, we have a solution to bring us back together again. There is a way out of this. There is a way to have a better life, to have a beautiful society. And it's not as hard as you think. You don't have to figure out how to move mountains. You just have to sit in simplicity #Twitter, #gossip, #bonding, #connection, #storytelling, #misinformation, #crazy, #stupid, #the art of friendship, #land of Shinar, #The story of Babel, #Tower of Babel, #fragmentation, #confirmation bias, TRANSCRIPT The Gossipy Friend[00:00:00] Fawn: Yay for us. Hi everybody. Yay for us, meaning all of us together listening right now. Hi everyone. Guess what? I was partaking in a very boring conversation yesterday [00:00:15] Matt: was [00:00:15] Fawn: that with me? You were there, but you were not the reason for the boredom, but you were. I think we were all contributing to the boredom because neither side wanted to talk about anything.Because one side lives and believes radically different than ours. All this [00:00:32] Matt: would be yes, yes. The call [00:00:34] Fawn: with family[00:00:35] Matt: family. [00:00:36] Fawn: So as the conversation was being had on speakerphone and the whole family's at the table, I must admit that I was zoning out ( Matt exclaims sarcastically) and we are surrounded by boxes in our kitchen, at the moment, there was one box that was in front of me and it had in big, big letters "BELONG", like belong B E L O N G. And I started to play like, oh, what other words can I make out of belong? And so I realized with belong, you can create "ONE GLOBE". We all belong to one globe. So I was tripping out on that, the whole conversation; one global. Am I the only one tripping out on that?Isn't that great?!?! Anyway, [00:01:20] Matt: you know, actually, nevermind. [00:01:21] Fawn: No, go ahead. [00:01:22] Matt: Well, I wrote a computer program because that's what I do. And I programmed peoples, I programmed all of the house names of the house into it. And as it turns out, if I scramble up the letters in ALLEGRA, it actually spells like a genus of birds or something random.I mean, it's weird. Yeah, nobody else's full names came out to anything, but,[00:01:43] Fawn: but collectively our names come to "FAME". [00:01:46] Matt: Well, that's the first letter of each [00:01:48] Fawn: that's as complex as I can get.[00:01:50] Matt: I understand. Oh my God. I should get all the letters together. Scramble them up. [00:01:56] Fawn: Okay. Stop. So we digress. We have digressed even before we have started, we have a really good show today.Oh, well, you know, show we have a really important topic we want to talk about. We're really eager to get into. So I'm going to start. And then Matt, you come in. Okay. Matt is covering his mouth cause I told them don't you interrupt me? Let me, let me get my thoughts out first because I am the Chewbacca. I can't play games with people. If you interrupt me, or if you disagree with me or if you win, I get really mad, I, I can't function after that in a normal way.Matt is looking away. All right. So here we go. Initially, we were going to talk about the, what did we call it initially? The title we were going to use[00:02:47] Matt: "The Disagreeable Friend" , [00:02:48] Fawn: "The Disagreeable Friend" , and as we were delving into it, I realized, oh my goodness, this goes back to what we learned some years ago that, people get labeled as crazy or stupid.Right? When you are no longe

Southern Fried True Crime
151 :The Murder of Mike Williams

Southern Fried True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 70:45


In the early morning hours of December 16, 2000, 31 year old Mike Williams disappeared while duck hunting on Lake Seminole. Initially, authorities theorized he hit a stump, fell overboard, and drowned. Authorities searched for Mike, and over the course of 56 days, found his boat, jacket, and waders. But there was no sign of Mike anywhere, so authorities added to their theory: after drowning, Mike was eaten by alligators. Mike was officially declared dead, and his missing persons case was closed. But Mike's mother Cheryl refused to believe the theory, and set out on a long journey for justice. 17 years later, authorities would find out Cheryl was right - Mike hadn't been eaten by an alligator. He'd been murdered.Hosted and produced by Erica KelleyWritten by Haley Gray and Erica KelleyResearched by Haley GrayOriginal Graphic Art by Coley HornerOriginal Music by Rob Harrison of Gamma RadioEdited & Mixed by Next Day Podcast & Erica KelleySources: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/mike-williamsSponsors: SplendidSpoon.com/SFTC BetterHelp.com/southern FunctionofBeauty.com/SFTC

Let's Pod This
Where is the budget?

Let's Pod This

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 55:09


With less than two weeks before sine die, we have yet to see a budget proposal...from anyone! Also, the investigation into the Swadley's scandal deepens and the multicounty grand jury issued policy recommendations but no indictments. Relevant links are below! Let's start with the latest on BBQGate. Two important developments came to light this week: First, The Frontier reported that https://nondoc.com/2022/05/11/pair-of-campaign-websites-now-available-on-state-network/ (Months before seeking bids, a state tourism official spoke of a deal for Swadley's Foggy Bottom Kitchen to ‘make money from day one')  Also, the House Special Investigative Committee that is looking into this scandal convened their first hearing and heard testimony from LOFT director Mike Jackson. During that meeting, it was disclosed that 74% of the funds -  https://www.oklahoman.com/story/news/2022/05/13/swadleys-foggy-bottom-kitchen-investigation-okahoma-tourism-recreation-department-taxpayer-costs/9702143002/ ($12.4M of the $16.7M given to Swadleys - was misspent.) Director Jackson said this happened because the Tourism Department lacked the proper checks and balances. Some examples: Travel was reimbursed multiple times. Jackson noted that the mileage reimbursement for one month in 2020 could have paid for someone to drive around the globe four times.  one of the 59 subcontractors hired by Swadley's to make park and dining improvements charged a $20,000 fee on $53,000 worth of work. In addition, Swadley's then charged project-specific consulting and management fees, Jackson said. a cheese melter that Swadley's expensed for $11,600. When LOFT looked into it, the office found the same manufacturer charged no more than $5,500 for that item, Jackson said.  https://nondoc.com/2022/05/12/oklahoma-county-grand-jury-report/ (The multicounty grand jury filed their report on Thursday )and included within it were a number of findings as well as recommendations.  The report says, among other things, that Governor Stitt put improper political pressure on his appointees to the Pardon & Parole board.   The grand jury is convened by the District Attorney for the purpose of reviewing evidence and, when justified, issuing indictments. So...why is this grand jury issuing policy recommendations? (And is that even legal?) https://nondoc.com/2022/05/11/pair-of-campaign-websites-now-available-on-state-network/ (Initially blocked, pair of campaign websites ‘now available' on state network) (NonDoc) https://nondoc.com/2022/05/12/the-weird-political-misadventure-of-two-tag-agent-bills/ (The ‘weird political misadventure' of two tag agent bills) (NonDoc)

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Battling Addiction & Staying Fit Healthily with Mike Catherwood - Episode 2101

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 86:02


Episode 2101 - On this Friday show, Mike Catherwood joins Vinnie Tortorich and the two talk Tom Leykis, Mike's career in radio, battling addiction, staying fit healthily, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2022/05/battling-addiction-staying-fit-healthily-mike-catherwood-episode-2101 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS CAREER IN RADIO Mike is a great voice in radio. You might know him as Psycho Mike from KROQ. KROQ is a hugely influential force in Los Angeles. He also co-hosted the famous radio show, Loveline, for six years. Mike got to KROQ in 2003. He grew up listening to the station. Prior to radio, he was an aspiring musician but as that didn't take off full-time, he found his way to radio. Initially, he wanted to be a songwriter and he played bass and guitar.  His first gig in radio was in production on a morning show. BATTLING ADDICTION Earlier in his life, he suffered with addiction during this time. He would have long periods of blacking out and was really struggling. Mike had done so much damage before he got help that stuck. He would be clean for a few weeks at a time but he couldn't stay clean. The most recent time he (and hopefully the last time he'll have to) got sober, he finally realized this was something he had to do to save himself. Mike follows the twelve step program, but he recognizes it's not for everyone. It'll be 20 years of sobriety for Mike later this year! this means he'll have been in recovery for half of his life. It's important to Mike that he not forget about this period of time. He's proud of the man he is now -- not reckless, a family man. STAYING FIT HEALTHILY Mike looks amazing and stays in great shape. He even inspires Vinnie to keep working out! For Mike, he had to make sure that he did not overdo it with working out. He had to find synergy between his mental health and his p For awhile, he was genuinely addicted to lifting weights and looking better. His addiction bled over to his body. This wasn't healthy for him. He didn't care how many steroids he took, and he was still never comfortable in his own skin. Finally, a few years ago, he found how to find comfort in what he was doing and in his relationship with food. He now focuses on developing himself positively emotionally and physically. PURCHASE BEYOND IMPOSSIBLE The documentary launched this week, January 11! Order it TODAY! This is Vinnie's third documentary in just over three years. Get it now on Apple TV (iTunes) and/or Amazon Video! Link to the film on Apple TV (iTunes):  Share this link with friends, too! Link to the film on Amazon Video: It's also now available on Amazon (USA only for now)!  Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY 2 (2021) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY (2019) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter!

Autobiology Bits with JLF
Ep 34: How to Hack EMFs like Mother Nature for Better Athletic Performance with Justin Frandson

Autobiology Bits with JLF

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 49:14


Episode 34: On today's episode I talk with Justin Frandson who is into hacking EMFs just like Mother Nature intended. Initially an Athleticism Performance coach, Justin started noticing that with increasing use of technology while training athletes came an unexpected decrease in performance.  When he took away the devices, performance went up. Thus, his deep interest in understanding EMFs and other invisible stressors was born.Check out and connect with Justin! Website: EMFrocks.com for grounding and faraday bagsWebsite: Athleticism.com for Justin's book "Athleticism: Whole body +  Whole brain = Performance" plus many other productsOther books mentioned in this podcast:Arthur Firstenburg: The Invisible Rainbow, A History of Electricity and LifeEileen Day McKusick: Electric Body, Electric HealthThomas Cowan: The Truth about Contagion, Exploring Theories on How Disease SpreadsConnect with Me!TikTok: @jenniferlittlefleckRumble: @autobiologywithjenniferWebsite: https://autobiology.net/YouTube: autobiologyWebsite: https://autobiology.net/IG: @autobiologywithjenniferAutobiology Bits Podcast on AppleAutobiology Bits Podcast on Google$50 off your Test from The DNA Company Revolutionizing DNA interpretation by matching genetic systems to human biochemistry. Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Authentic Conversations
Humility, Honesty, and Servant Leadership with Aaron Walker

Authentic Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 45:35


Initially, it can be difficult to see common ground between being an effective leader and being a servant. But we Christians know that servant leadership was a big part of Jesus' ministry and is a call for anyone who takes up the mantle of leadership today. What can we do to bridge the gap between […] The post Humility, Honesty, and Servant Leadership with Aaron Walker first appeared on Ryan James Miller.

Insight Myanmar
A Delicate Balance

Insight Myanmar

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 117:32


Kenton Clymer joins the podcast to speak about his book, "A Delicate Relationship: The United States and Burma/Myanmar since 1945." In the waning days of World War II, Americans were primarily concerned with stopping the spread of Communism, especially after Mao's revolution, which thrust neighboring Burma into an important geopolitical position. Initially, the US thought that U Nu, Burma's first Prime Minister, was too Socialist-leaning, while Ne Win, the eventual dictator, was seen as an anti-Communist strongman. The 1950s were a challenging decade for the Burmese government. The country's ethnic groups were suspicious of a powerful central government—with some like the Karen actively fighting against it—and the Chinese and Americans were engaged in geopolitical maneuvering in the north of the country. After Ne Win's second coup in 1962, the primary concern on the American side was ensuring that Burma didn't fall into the Soviet or Chinese camp as a result. For the next 26 years, the US looked on as civil liberties continued to erode, the economy collapsed, ethnic groups pushed for greater rights, scores of Indians were exiled, and the country became increasingly isolated and shut off from the rest of the world. Besides Communism, the only other real area of American interest in Burma was the narcotics trade. As Ne Win was staunchly opposed to drugs, he accepted American support, including aircraft and intelligence sharing, to eradicate the poppy fields. However, it is uncertain how effective this collaboration was, and in fact human rights activists later discovered that the Tatmadaw used the chemical sprays on human targets in the country's ethnic regions. The perception of Burma, and the shape of US relations, changed irrevocably in 1988, with the violent crackdown on student protests and the nullification of the subsequent election. The anti-Communist prism through which the American government's Burma policy had been viewed for decades changed to one of human rights; Aung San Suu Kyi was its figurehead.   Clymer addresses some important developments in recent Myanmar history up to the NLD's electoral victory in 2015, when his book was published, and discusses what occurred since. While he sees recurring cycles at play in the current situation, he also has reason for optimism. He feels that the current group of Gen-Z activists will not put up with oppressive military rule like in the past.

Conversations with Sam Dean
Building Enduring Customer Loyalty by Focusing on the People with Aveline Clarke

Conversations with Sam Dean

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 39:14


In Episode 106 of The Business Habitat podcast, Sam is joined by Aveline Clarke, Customer Journey and Marketing Growth Architect, Founder of Journey Point and host of the 6 Star Business Podcast. Together they talk about the importance of building customer loyalty through alignment of values and authentic communication.With a background in marketing and human resources, Aveline realised there was a gap in the customer process, with businesses more focussed on lead generation and conversion without truly understanding who their customers are. Initially managing the Executive Resource function for Australia Post before moving onto roll out a best practice onboarding change management process at National Australia Bank, Aveline honed her people skills and developed her passion for employee and customer engagement.In this conversation, Aveline and Sam consider the importance of aligning your customers to your goals and values and deciding who it is you want to work with. So often in the corporate world it is encouraged to portray a professional image which is often disconnected to real people. Aveline notes that businesses forget about themselves and fail to take into account what it is they stand for and what they are ultimately trying to achieve beyond the bottom line.With the shared vision of aligning themselves with purpose-driven businesses, Sam and Aveline discuss the proposition that enterprises flourish and build customer loyalty when stakeholders are unafraid to share their true authentic selves. Tune into this episode for a deeper analysis and more thought-provoking conversation around the importance of heart-centred business.Here at BlueprintHQ, we are here to help. We are super passionate about the professional services industry and supporting you with what you need. We are offering a short, sharp 15 minute consultation call to help you with this process. Go to https://www.blueprinthq.com.au/consultation

The Archers
11/05/2022

The Archers

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:54


Jazzer's excited. Tracy has her interview at the Orangery, and he's secured a commission with a sales rep visit to Greenacres. Freddie informs him this will also mean some commission for Lily, as Jazzer's recruiter. Tracy comes out of her interview and chats to Freddie about their job situation. She declares thoughtlessly that Freddie has everything on a plate. Freddie reminds her he's taking over from his dad, and Tracy apologises for her comment. They agree they're just on different tracks. Tracy gets the news that she hasn't got the job – but Chelsea has! And every penny she earns will go to her mum. Overcome Tracy hugs her daughter. The Felpersham Kitchens sales rep flatters Jim on the state of Greenacres, but declares the kitchen is underperforming. Panicked Alistair has the rep fetching tile samples, while Jim rolls his eyes. They don't need a new kitchen. Alistair just wants to help Jazzer out. Jim has a brainwave, and informs Fern the rep that they'll need agreement from Alistair's ‘wife' Shula, who's currently away. Fern's about to leave when Shula walks in the door. Initially mystified, Shula soon cottons on to the plan, and plays along, doing an expert job of convincing Fern that she really does not want a new kitchen. Fern is finally squashed. Jazzer's delighted her visit will mean commission for him, and will help Tracy. Jim's less positive. They came within a whisker of buying a kitchen they didn't want, and the odd bit of commission won't make any difference to Tracy's money worries.

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast
Episode 202: Sonia Pupaza on How Microlearning Drives Intentional Development

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 15:27


Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast. I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space and we're here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs. Today I’m excited to have Sonia Pupaza from Camunda join us. Sonia, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience. Sonia Pupaza: Hi Shawnna, thank you for having me here. I feel honored and excited to be here today. As you mentioned, my name is Sonia and I work in field enablement at Camunda. My professional experience expands across multiple fields and multiple industries. I started in marketing in the public sector, moved to project management in banking, then marketing and exports in a manufacturing company, like a tableware producer, and then, amazing, I moved to Japan where I graduated from an executive training program, worked in an embassy supporting some events, market research. Then I came back to my country and moved to the other side of learning and became a program manager for Angloville, which is an English learning training program for adults. After that, I designed my own courses on Udemy. Deciding what to do with my life was the most difficult part ever. For Udemy, I designed courses where I mapped the skills that I felt needed for certain domains like marketing and sales because at that point I didn’t know what to choose to do next. Those courses became very popular. I also enjoyed producing them, so I started to look for a job developing courses and started working in Oracle as a sales enablement professional designing courses for sales and consulting. I probably would be still working in Oracle, but I’ve changed the country I live in and by changing the country, I decided to join another company, which is now Camunda. It’s a company with only 300 people compared to what Oracle was, giant, but I feel like all the skills and knowledge that I gathered working in Oracle can be easily applied. I can try new things here in Camunda. SS: Well, I’m excited to have you on our podcast today. On LinkedIn, you wrote a post about microlearning that says “in order to have a sustainable approach to learning, we need to be more mindful and intentional regarding where we put our energy and our attention.” I love that quote, how does microlearning help create a sustainable approach to learning? SP: Well, mindfulness and being intentional are on my mind all the time because I was also a founder of a well-being enthusiast group and it became part of my life. I feel like in today’s fast-paced world, most of us become so attached to the digital environment that we feel disconnected from everyone and everything when we put down our gadgets. We are bombarded with so much content that it becomes very difficult to distinguish what’s valuable, what’s of immediate use or just nice to have. If it’s just filling up our free time with something of interest, then it’s fine to do what you like, read a book, read a blog, listen to a podcast or watch a movie, but if we have a plan of personal or professional growth all this time spent doing whatever is a valuable resource that we can use to move intentionally towards reaching our goals. Being spontaneous is great, but having a plan in mind helps us get further with baby steps and helps us build our blocks. If we could plan some small bites of learning into our everyday life, it gets us further than blocking only two hours for one day at the end of the week, let’s say. Those small chunks of time build your long-lasting habits of learning something new every day rather than those two hours just because you have to. SS: Absolutely. Now, you’ve also talked about the importance of keeping reps engaged in learning programs, especially in the virtual and hybrid environments that you were just chatting about. What are some of your best practices for generating that engagement? SP: So sharing from my own experience, I have traveled and concentrated in learning in uni, just reading a book and making it somehow work and basing all my programs on bite-sized content. Just because the learner’s attention span is between two and six minutes. I’m also guiding all the SMEs that I work with to concentrate on just one topic that's no longer than six minutes. My aim is to set up our team for success by being ready to reuse, recombine, and repurpose some of it. Some information might get outdated very fast and some other information might need to be replaced. We are trying to cover one topic in a video and then keep the section under 30 minutes so a person can schedule that 30 minutes during the day. They don’t necessarily need to consume all the content of the program in one day, as I mentioned, they can split it during several consecutive days or when they have the time to dedicate 30 minutes for their learning. We use short training materials to cover how-to videos for tools and other stuff that can be covered in such a short time. We also extract short success stories or interviews from longer presentation sessions and webinars. For the longer presentation sessions and webinars that the leaders want us to share with our team, the least I can do is to add some timestamps to help navigate faster and go directly to the information of their immediate use. SS: So you mentioned that the content in your programs can play a big role in delivering genuine engagement. When it comes to content, what are your best practices for finding the right in-house content to use to create your training programs? SP: Well, finding the right in-house content is always difficult, especially if you are working for an older, larger, and more mature organization. The challenge is to identify that content. That usually files into three piles, like outdated, needs updated, and still up to date. The key to surface the most useful content and keep it all up to date is to have a procedure in place to revise it periodically and have it mapped on specific skills and keywords, curated, and repurposed as needed. For younger, smaller organizations the challenge is to identify existing content and mapping the gaps. There is also the challenge of how to best use the low resources in human capital. Usually, your field enablement team is very small and they have to do a lot of things. In Camunda, we have to start from information stored on conference pages and organize informative sessions about what’s new in the company, then what sales teams need to know in order to perform their jobs, and we are now moving towards video-based learning practical sessions and life certification. When you are starting in our company and there is no tracking system in place, what you have to do is map your content to know what you have. So by the time you need to create something at least you will know what you have and what needs to be further developed. SS: You just mentioned different ways that content developers can create content to be easily consumed by the learners, so how do you work with subject matter experts or SMEs to create that consumable content? SP: Well, approaching different SMEs depends on the type of training we want to create as a process. Your first step would be to ask the sales leaders about what they need, then tie their needs to the company goals, validate the needs and then create a calendar based on the sales enablement team availability to create and deliver, and the sales team availability to consume the training. It doesn’t make sense to work so much in developing content that the sales team do not have the time to consume and the sales either do not have the buying and do not promote your training. Once you have decided what training you want to create, the next step would be deciding who’s going to be your SMEs and guide them into what you need. Usually, you are using many subject matter experts who are coming from different fields and you will have to make sure they are on the same page so you’re program is consistent and delivered on the same level of quality. So for company-related knowledge like strategy, positioning, specific solutions, we work with the founders. We have two co-founders to share the message and then different field leaders like sales leaders, product marketing team leaders and also professionals on their job who already have authority in the company and the face for delivering that content. For training on how to use specific tools, we use vendor training materials combined with in-house specialists like the early adopters who have tried it and made it work for themselves and learn how to navigate the tools, while for skills training, like the sales skills throughout the sales cycle. If it’s general knowledge or general skills we can try to bring in a specialist on the topic who has already delivered training materials and training programs because it doesn’t make sense to reinvent the width. SS: That’s fantastic. Now, as the sales environment continues to evolve, how do you anticipate your training programs will also evolve and how are you beginning to plan for this in your current enablement strategy? SP: Well Shawnna, I think that’s a really great question. I can only provide an answer that fits a medium-sized company, like we are about 300 people at Camunda with a relatively new function. Field enablement function is less than three years old. The experience I got from Oracle where the sales enablement function was covered by almost 300 people showed me what good looks like. Now at Camunda, with a team of two, soon to become three people, we need to provide the best possible experience with our training program so that the teams in the field become more successful due to the new gained knowledge and skills and they return to us to ask for what they need. Initially, the team was focusing on putting up fires meaning reacting to the leaders immediate needs more on communicating what’s new and trust me, there is always something new in this company that the sales still needs to be aware of and know how to position that information to their prospects and customers. We have monthly spark sessions for creating awareness on this subject and updates. We’ve developed a couple of training programs which include sharing information, checking learner’s understanding and testing how they apply what they’ve learned and of course more topics to come on that. We are also moving towards creating a safe playground where our sales team can apply what they learned before going to the customers, like incorporating training sessions in our programs with breakout rooms and places where they can interact with each other on the topics. The next step would be creating certification sessions for more sensitive content. When I’m saying sensitive content and talking about Camunda launching our new platform product which is revolutionary for us and everyone needs to be enabled on what to say and how to position this new product. We need people to train on how to position things because we haven’t done it before on this topic. We’ve been through a lot of changes and now it’s time to get us all aligned. Our field enablement team initially had the VP and now we moved under the RevOps. We have promoted a new sales leader, because the previous one left, so it’s time for everyone to get on the same page and we are trying to set the priorities and the broad map for the next two years. Even if you are saying maybe in sales enablement two years is a lot and it’s too much, starting from scratch is usually very difficult and if there is something on that road map at least there is a way to grab what’s there and maybe reprioritize. Another way to help us navigate and get faster to create training programs is by defining the process of how to get there by also creating templates and processes and checklists and procedures, so it’s easier to replicate faster. SS: Fantastic, Sonia, thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it today. To our audience, thanks for listening. For more insights, tips, and expertise from sales enablement leaders, visit salesenablement.pro. If there is something you'd like to share or a topic you'd like to learn more about, please let us know we'd love to hear from you.

The Brave Table with Dr. Neeta Bhushan
Sharing your bravest story with Selena Soo

The Brave Table with Dr. Neeta Bhushan

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 52:24


Welcome back, Brave Table fam, for today's episode with Selena Soo. Selena is a Public Relations boss woman whose superpower is turning authors, coaches, and experts into leaders of their industry. She's helped her clients and students get featured in places like The Oprah Magazine, Forbes, and Inc., plus land interviews on popular podcasts and national TV.   Born in Hong Kong to the first Asian man accepted into Oxford University, an Ivy League Graduate, and the CEO of multi-7-figure businesses, Selena is as high-achieving as they come, with plenty of stories and successes to share.    But in this conversation, Selena shares her bravest story yet; it's the story of how a bright, educated, accomplished woman found herself in an abusive relationship, why this happens, how to get out of it, and the lessons on the other side.    What you'll get out of this episode…   - Learning to let go of being in control and taking responsibility for everything as a high-achieving woman or CEO of a business - How to recognize emotional abuse early on: what are the warning signs and red flags to look for - Undoing the conditioning of saving face and keeping up appearances, particularly in Asian cultures - Understanding the complexity of abusive relationships and how to identify when it might be happening to you - Why it's so important to give your pain a voice and share your story - Why you should value internal growth and development over external achievements and rewards - How to rise above when things start to fall apart, despite having a picture-perfect life on the outside - How to stop people-pleasing and take your power back   In 2017, Selena felt on top of the world. Her business was flourishing with no stop in sight, she was celebrating with friends, and she met the person she thought would be her Prince Charming.    Initially, Selena wasn't interested, but the guy persisted: ”love bombing” her with grand gestures, flower bouquets, gift cards, you name it. He was determined to win her over. Finally, Selena gave in and let the relationship evolve into something romantic. How could she not, right? Here this man was devoting all his attention to her, making her the top priority in his life. But eventually, the dynamic started to shift.    He became increasingly interested in her business and her money, even going as far as to gaslight her into believing that her team didn't have her best interests so she would let them all go. He was manipulative and emotionally abusive, and the situation eventually reached a breaking point where she found the courage to leave.    However, as it so often happens in toxic relationships, they got back together after he promised to change, isolating herself even further by moving to Florida with him. Then, one day when she finally received her long-awaited Green Card—a day that should have been joyful and full of celebration but instead was full of tears and anxiety—she decided it was over, packed her bags, and left—for good.    Today, Selena has been reflecting on her experience with coaches and healers, discovering how to make healthier choices, seeing where she gives her power away, and learning that life will keep giving you tests until you've learned your lessons. But most importantly, despite it all, Selena is still ready for love.    Having been through my own abusive relationship, I relate so much to Selena's story and how disorienting it can feel to find ourselves in this kind of situation, despite being so savvy in other areas of our lives. She shows us the power and importance of sharing our stories—even when we look like we're leading a life of glitz and glamour but falling apart on the inside. Our stories can change people's lives and save people's lives, and we release our shame and pain when we give it a voice and realize we're not alone.    If you liked this episode, be sure to check out… - Selena's website at https://www.selenasoo.com/ and find her on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/selena_soo/  - Read her article, I was in an emotionally abusive relationship, even as a smart and successful woman, here https://selenasoo.medium.com/i-was-in-an-emotionally-abusive-relationship-even-as-a-smart-and-successful-woman-8804ffe58cc9  - More about healing from abusive relationships from my divorce https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-means-to-be-brave/id1608226580?i=1000551021321 - How to know when a relationship is toxic and when to end it with Amber Valdez https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/amber-valdez-how-to-be-brave-in-toxic-relationships/id1608226580?i=1000556399717  Before you go, I wanted to make sure that you know about The Brave Table Mother's Day Giveaway happening until May 16. Enter to win the GRAND PRIZE of a $200 VISA gift card to treat yourself to some pampering or one of our spa prize packs (valued at $50 each)! Even if you're not a mama, you're welcome to enter anyway! All you need to do is leave The Brave Table a review, take a screenshot of your review, and then upload it at www.thebravetable.com/giveaway. Good luck to everyone and thanks for being here. See you next time!

The Best Practices Show
Incorporating More Oral Pathology in Your Dental Practice with Dr. Ashley Clark

The Best Practices Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 25:28


Incorporating More Oral Pathology in Your Dental Practice Episode #418 with Dr. Ashley Clark Survival rates for oral cancers are not great. So, the best thing to do is to actively prevent them.  And today, Kirk Behrendt brings in Dr. Ashley Clark, Division Chief of Oral Pathology at the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, to share the importance of early detection, the steps to take when you come across a case, and how to communicate your findings without terrifying your patients. Screening every patient, every time, can help save a life! To learn more, listen to Episode 418 of The Best Practices Show! Main Takeaways: Early detection is critical to preventing oral cancers. Screen every patient, every time, for oral cancer. Adequately train team members to look for signs. Never ignore leukoplakia. It can become cancerous. Communicate clearly without scaring your patients. Quotes: “Oral cancer is probably the biggest thing we deal with — the most important thing that we deal with, specifically squamous cell carcinoma — and survival rates aren't getting any better. They really haven't significantly improved. So, my passion is to get the information out there, catch it before it turns into cancer. That's my main goal, is to educate as many general dentists, specifically, as possible on how to find leukoplakia, what it looks like, what it can mimic, and what to do about it so we can hopefully prevent these oral squamous cell carcinomas from happening.” (2:25—3:02) “The five-year survival rate for oral cancer that is HPV-negative is 45% to 50%, overall. And that doesn't include the fact that they're going to have a pretty disfiguring surgery to try to get the cancer out, plus or minus radiation where they might lose saliva and have to deal with those quality-of-life issues. So, if we can catch leukoplakia as it's in its dysplastic phase, surgically removing it lowers that risk of that patient having oral cancer by 50%. So, that's where we are. I will say that the rates of HPV-negative oral cancer have declined, and that correlates with the decline in smoking. But the survival rates still aren't great.” (3:14—4:04) “[The decline in HPV-negative oral cancer risk] directly correlates with the decline in smoking. About 80% of patients with HPV-negative oral cancer are pretty heavy smokers — or people who smoke pretty heavily, I'd rather say. But one interesting thing that's happening is between the ages of 18 and 44, there's been this cohort of young women who have been getting tongue cancers without any risk factors — no HPV, no tobacco, no alcohol. So, that's another thing I like to get out. Don't ignore your 30-year-old female patient who has a white tongue lesion, because incidents have grown 0.06% every year for like 20 years. So, that's another group that might be getting overlooked.” (4:09—4:56) “I think other healthcare professionals who are focusing on the teeth might forget to look at the soft tissue. That's not a value judgment — I did it myself several times when I was in charge of looking at teeth. I forgot, or I was focused in on that pathology. So, I think it could be really easy to focus in on the crown you're doing and forget about doing an oral cancer screening. So, I think doing them every patient, every time, is one thing upon which we could improve.” (5:34—5:57) “Another [important] thing is to not ignore leukoplakia, especially if it's on the gingiva. Sometimes, leukoplakia doesn't really look that scary — especially proliferative verrucous leukoplakia. Initially, it doesn't look that scary. But if it's left untreated, nearly 100% will eventually turn into cancer. So, don't ignore things that could come down the road.” (6:04—6:26) “I train a lot of dental hygienists. And they actually find a ton of lesions, in my experience. They might not always know what they are as well as a doctor who might have a little bit more training does. But the hygienists have been great at screening and...

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Exploring American Sparkling Wine w/ Michael Cruse, Ultramarine & Cruse Wine Co

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:38


Sparkling wine is trending at the moment and no brand best embodies the trend more than cult California sparkling wine producer Ultramarine. Michael Cruse, the founder of Ultramarine and Cruse Wine Co, explains how he developed a passion for sparkling wine that led to his accidental success. He covers how Ultramarine took off, techniques and production practices that have business implications he took from Champagne, pricing, and his view on sales channels. Detailed Show Notes: UltramarineStarted in 2008, 1st real vintage was 2010Sparkling wine in CA that focuses on coastal single vineyards, high acid, single vintagePrecise production style - not copying Champagne, but taking some techniques and applying them to CAHarvest ~1,000 cases/year, ~500-750 cases make the cut for releaseLimited ability to grow (due to lack of suitable fruit sources), target ~1,200-1,500 case rangeCruse Wine CoStarted in 2013, supposed to be a custom crush facilityInitially not for sparkling wine, an interest in ValdiguieLater realized his passion was in sparkling wine - does pet nats, more experimental, more oxidative stylesFocus on CA as a whole vs. coastal vineyards of Ultramarine~7,000 cases/year (2018 was peak ~8,500 cases)The capital intensity of producing sparklingCruse Tradition takes ~40 months to make which means 3 vintages must be paid for before selling any wine (e.g. - fruit, glass ($2+/bottle), etc…) - this limits growthUltramarine spends 38-48 months en tirage, found this to be its sweet spotSparkling wine equipmentBought own equipment vs. doing custom crush at Rack & Riddle - partially due to using a bottle that they would not takeFollows many Champagne producers - they may use co-op press, but do own elevage and disgorgementUses a gyropalette, which requires some bentonite (riddling aid)Long term relationship with growers is important -> growing sparkling is different than still wine grapesVarietal impact on winemakingChardonnay - less fruit, more minerality - be more reductive to preserve fruitPinot Noir - more fruit, less minerality - be more oxidative to get more mineralityPricingValue spaces (~$20-25/bottle), e.g. - Gloria Ferrer, Roederer Estate, Cruse doesn't have the scale or capital to compete hereDoesn't think he can sell 10,000 cases @ $70/bottleBelieves he can sell 5-10,000 cases @ $45-55/bottleUnclear how Champagne price inflation will impact market opportunity for domestic sparklingUltramarine secondary pricing - goes for 3x release price; believes it's only ~30 bottles/year @ $200/bottle, could not sell entire production at that price pointSales channelsCruse - ⅓ DTC, ⅓ domestic wholesale, ⅓ export (Asia - Japan, Singapore strong)Ultramarine - 90-95% DTC - believes sweet spot is ~80% DTC to get more into restaurantsUltramarine mailing listBig supporters early on propelled the brand (e.g. - the NYC crew of Patrick Cappiello, Levi Dalton, and Pascaline Lepeltier)Instagram helped to fuel growthTook 3 releases (2012 release) to get a waiting listWine Berserkers also helpedCruse launch planNo real plan initially focused on friends & familyHardy Wallace helped get wines in front of distributorsRelationships with certain wine critics helpThe website is unintentionally sparse but does longer allocation emails Get access to library episodes See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Injuries 101 Podcast
UPDATE! Fernando Tatis Wrist - Is it worse than initially thought?? Surgeon's Take

Injuries 101 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 5:16


Hand surgeon Dr. Amar Patel reacts to breaking news of Fernando Tatis Jr. broken wrist. Is it worse than previously thought?? __________________________________________________________________________ Thank you to DonJoy Performance for sponsoring this video! Get 20% Off football products with Promo Code TFD20 at www.donjoyperformance.com/football#DJO #PoweringMotion #sportsmedicine #sportsinjury __________________________________________________________________________ Get your TFD Hoodies, T-shirts, and other apparel here - https://the-fantasy-doctors.creator-spring.com/ TFD APP info: - What it is? All the best sports follows on Twitter in one easy place plus injury reports, and videos for the 4 main sports - Promo video: https://youtu.be/FsLqXEynz1o - More info here: https://thefantasydoctorsapp.com/ - How to use tutorial video: https://youtu.be/kvVvNlTKcd0 - Notifications only are for new injuries. - Available on the Apple and Google Play App Stores. __________________________________________________________________________ NFL Injury Reports - Bookmark them and check daily https://thefantasydoctors.com/nfl-injury-tracker/ - Also available on TFD App (white medical button, middle bottom) - Detailed/Advanced version available on: https://tfdinjurydraftguide.com/ __________________________________________________________________________ Follow us on Social Media - Twitter / IG / TikTok / Facebook - @TheFantasyDRS @TFDNBA, @TFDNFL, @TFDMLB, @TFDNHL - @DrJesseMorse @seleneparekhMD @amarpatelMD @Harjas_Grewal 00:00 Intro 00:45 Buffalo vs New England 01:00 Cincinnati vs Las Vegas 01:15 Tampa Bay vs Philadelphia 02:22 Dallas vs San Francisco 03:16 Kansas City vs Pittsburgh 05:29 Bengals 06:18 Titans 07:51 49ers 10:00 Packers 11:30 Buccaneers 13:11 Rams 15:06 Bills 15:27 Chiefs ___________________________________________________________________________ If you're interested in advertising with us, send us an email at: TheFantasyDRS@gmail.com

The Genuinely Interested Podcast
Ep 127 Ron Schneidermann - AllTrails CEO

The Genuinely Interested Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 67:11


Ron is the CEO of AllTrails, the most used and trusted outdoors platform in the world. Before becoming the CEO of AllTrails, Ron was Head of Growth at Yelp Reservations, Co-Founder of Liftopia, and Head of Business Development at Hotwire. The mission of AllTrails is to help people explore the outdoors with hand-curated trail maps along with photos, reviews, and user recordings crowdsourced from an ever-growing community of millions. Initially, Ron was hesitant to accept the role of CEO that was offered to him, but after some soul searching he decided to accept - and ever since the growth of AllTrails has been undeniable. Ron and I discussed: The origins of AllTrails Why he was reluctant to accept the role of CEO Understanding their end-user Why COVID was such a boom for their success Why UGC is a critical component Potential future features The importance of the outdoors for mental health Why inclusivity in the outdoors is their top priority Hitting the 1 million subscribers goal Why culture starts at the top And much more... Ron Schneidermann My Take: Even though we are getting more technologically advanced by the hour, the outdoors are and always will be an integral part of us. Finding a way to marry the two is the type of innovation necessary for this day & age. As someone who uses this app regularly, I can attest to how much easier and safer it makes my hikes - while allowing me to find trails I may not know of otherwise. How To Start A Podcast Support The Podcast

Infectious Groove Podcast
IGP Crew Album Review: The Weeknd - Kiss Land

Infectious Groove Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 50:40


AND WE'RE BACK! Man, that seemed like the longest between-season break ever, but lucky for you, we're back and better than ever. This season (season 6 a.k.a season 3 or 4 if you ask Michelle) is going to be another killer ride. We're starting this one off strong with our critically acclaimed album review series that you've all mostly grown to love.This time it's Kyle who went the extra mile and plugged us in with something that many of you might not have tuned into before hearing this. We all know of The Weeknd, I mean how could you not? He's been in the musical air supply for quite some time now, but what you hear now and where it all began are wildly different. The Weeknd was releasing music long before he had a major label record deal, and many of those projects are what put him on the map to begin with. Considered to be his first major-label release, Kiss Land turned it up a notch when it came to production, writing, art direction, and the overall concept of a project. Working with new producers and refusing to allow himself to be boxed into a specific sound and style. He even chose an album title that he thought would initially throw his fans off when they learned about its upcoming release. The Weeknd is no stranger when it comes to putting together a good concept album, and Kiss Land is no different. Meant to represent the trials and tribulations of life on the road, Kiss Land is full of sexual obsession, betrayal, addiction, and big-ticket trust issues and it's a weirdly exhilarating experience, that isn't for the faint of heart. Initially met with generally positive reviews, Kiss Land would debut at number two on the US Billboard 200 with 95,000 copies sold in its first week, and would go on to be certified gold by 2019. That may seem underwhelming compared to the numbers that he currently does, but you have to remember that this is considered to be his "debut album", and reaching number 2 on the Billboard 200 with your first major-label offering is nothing short of impressive.Okay enough of the small talk, Kyle is telling me to tell you all that I should just let the album speak for itself, so that's what I am going to do. It's season 6, episode 1 of Amber Heard's legal team's, personal assistant's dog walker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
You Are Retiring From Your Past

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 6:50


Make an effort to hear the Silence now, and later you'll enjoy a pension.* Later this Silence will just be (t)here without you having to work for It. This Love will just flow to you, to the new you, to the retired you. The one that Love is retiring  from that unhealthy job, from that toxic relationship,or from that version of you that didn't feel confident,that version of you that didn't feel Go(o)d. You're retiring form being that one, and you're stepping into this new life where all you know is God, and the things of God, and the people of God,and the service of God. Your whole life is changing. Right now, as you read these words, relaxing your shoulders, feeling Go(o)d, you're changing your whole life. Keep holding God with both hands today, and know God is holding you, too, retiring, returning you to Hisself.  I Love you,Niknikki@curlynikki.comBonus episodes every week:▶▶https://www.patreon.com/goodmorningsGo(o)d Mornings merch:▶▶https://www.patreon.com/goodmornings_______________________Today's Quotes:  “The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” –Socrates"You must always fix the mind on the Lord. Initially, you have to make some effort.  Later you enjoy a pension."*-Ramakrishna "Do your work with one hand and hold onto God with the other. when you finish yor work, you will hold God with both hands."**-Ramakrishna "It is normal to experience a silent pause, a limbo space, between the old you and who you are becoming. Some call this the void,  It may feel a little empty, because you are shedding  yet another layer of who you once were while finding your foot ing for what is next. It can be so subtle that you may not even notice it. Except for the feeling that something is off, something has changed.  What used to resonate and excite you may feel a bit duller. But this  is because your consciousness is expanding and you are being nudged-- there is more out there! So much more that will move your soul. Only you don't know where to look just yet.  And that is okay.  It is in the pause, where you are recalibrating. Coming back to your center. Quieting the noise... The truth of who you are is beyond any human concept beyond language. Beyond thought.  And only you can feel It for yourself."- @asmi.path via Instagram Support the show

Oz Culture
Ep 80: I WANT MY PIG BACK! - Pig Movie Review

Oz Culture

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 24:12


Released in 2021, 'Pig' is an intriguing tale.  Pig is not an uplifting film. It's not an action film either. In fact, it's actually quite a depressing film, and certainly the most serious of Nicholas Cage's recent works. It's also a film that I highly recommend. There is so much subtlety and nuance in it, and it touches on some important issues. Nicholas Cage's character in the film was once a successful chef who has renounced his past life and chosen to live in the forest, shut off from the world, with only a pig for company. The storyline starts when the pig is kidnapped. Grief is a theme that runs strongly through Pig, as is the false sense of success that is overwhelmingly prevalent in our society. Be patient with this film, it's worth it.  First, it seems like yet another run of the mill revenge tale about a reclusive man who has his truffle pig kidnapped. Initially, it follows the same cliches as action hits like 'John Wick', but about 10 minutes into this film, you start to realize that this is going to be something so much more. This grim tale of grief and loss examines what it means to be successful, and it's one of the biggest sleeper hits I've seen. Support the show

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)
FTC Turns Sights To Probe Sony's Bungie Acquisition - IGN Daily Fix

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


On today's IGN The Fix: Games, The Federal Trade Commission is reportedly opening an inquiry into Sony's planned acquisition of Bungie, marking a notable ramp-up in federal oversight of gaming mergers during a period of major industry consolidation. The FTC was similarly investigating the planned acquisition of Activision Blizzard by Microsoft to determine whether it would harm consumers, partners, or competitors. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time has officially been inducted into the World Video Game Hall of Fame alongside Ms. Pac-Man, Dance Dance Revolution, and Sid Meier's Civilization. These games join 32 others that have been inducted since the World Video Game Hall of Fame began at New York's The Strong National Museum of Play in 2015. A 24k Golden Wii is being auctioned off by a Dutch console collector. Initially, a gift from THQ to promote the Big Family Games mini-game collection, before THQ went bankrupt in 2009 after spending too much money on idiotic marketing stunts, the asking price for the Queen Golden Wii is $300,000 - the highest bid being two grand.

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino
Montana-based Jazz Bassist Bob Bowman & LA-based Pianist Josh Nelson

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022


Welcome to a new edition of the Neon Jazz interview series with Montana-based Jazz Bassist Bob Bowman & LA-based Pianist Josh Nelson .. They talked about their creation .,. the new 2022 CD Tomorrow is Not Promised .. Initially they met in Topeka and the relationship started .. As Josh says, an opportunity arose, almost miraculously for these talented artists to congregate in Los Angeles for a moment in time. With varied repertoire, solid musicianship, and an excellent studio and engineer, this was a soulful and enjoyable recording experience that flowed effortlessly with grace, humility, humor, and respect. Dig this story .. Click to listen.Thanks for listening and tuning into yet another Neon Jazz interview .. where we give you a bit of insight into the finest players in Illinois, Venezuela, Nashville, Kansas City, and spots all over the USA giving fans all that jazz .. and thanks to Solitaire for her time, honesty and story ..  If you want to hear more interviews, go to Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino on the iTunes store, visit the Neon Jazz Youtube Channel, go The Home of Neon Jazz at  http://theneonjazz.blogspot.com/ and for everything Joe Dimino related go to www.joedimino.com and if you feel like it, you can donate to the Neon Jazz cause - https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=ERA4C4TTVKLR4 Until next time .. enjoy the music my friends

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands
Melbourne, Australia Artist, Peter Endall And Solo Project Suburban Spell

DJ Nocturna Presents Queen of Wands

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 28:32


Melbourne's Suburban Spell,  also known as Peter Endall is a veteran of Australia's new wave, synthpop, post-punk scene since the 1980s. Formerly the keyboardist for the popular 80s Melbourne band, Schizo Scherzo, Suburban Spell was taken from a line in the 1986 Pet Shop Boys hit single, "Suburbia."Initially an instrumental project, Suburban Spell's  debut single is called "Integration" from the self-titled album released in January 2021.  Split Levels, the latest album release on February 14, 2022, is a title referring to the popular Mid-Century design style for Split Level Suburban homes. With Endall's fascination with architecture, the new album treats the "Split Level" aesthetic analogous to the suburban dichotomy, drawing heavily from the aesthetics of Brutalist architecture. You can also watch the video interview on my YouTube channel. https://suburbanspell.bandcamp.comSubscribe to my monthly mailing list for the latest music news, updates and my next interviews and events:http://eepurl.com/gtw6PPQUEEN OF WANDS with DJ Nocturna Every Saturday on ModSnap RadioKMOD: San Antonio"San Antonio's leading alternative streaming Radio Station since 2017"Listen : http://modsnapradio.comPlaylist and podcast: https://djnocturna.comYouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/DJNocturna2pm (HST), 5pm (PST), 6pm (MST), 7pm (CST), 8pm (EST)

The CyberWire
Dateline Moscow, Kyiv, and Minsk: Hacktivisim and privateering. Log4j vulnerabilities more widespread than initially thought. US Cyber Command deploys "hunt forward" team to Lithuania.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 23:55


Hacktivisim and privateering in Moscow, Kyiv, and Minsk. Log4j vulnerabilities are more widespread than initially thought. US Cyber Command deployed a "hunt forward" team to Lithuania. CISA adds five vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog. Jen Miller-Osborn from Palo Alto Networks discusses the findings from the Center for Digital Government's survey on Getting Ahead of Ransomware. Grayson Milbourne of Webroot/OpenText discusses OpenText's 2022 BrightCloud Threat Report. And Anonymous leaks emails allegedly belonging to the Nauru Police Force. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/87 Selected reading. Russian ally Belarus launches military quick-response drills (Washington Post) Putin's Ukraine War: Desperate Belarus dictator strikes back (Atlantic Council) Russian ransomware group claims attack on Bulgarian refugee agency (CyberScoop) Russia and Ukraine Conflict Q&A | Cybersixgill (Cybersixgill) Threat Advisory: New Log4j Exploit Demonstrates a Hidden Blind Spot in the Global Digital Supply Chain (Cequence) Anonymous Leak 82GB of Police Emails Against Australia's Offshore Detention (HackRead)

Seattle Opera Podcast
LA TRAVIATA 101

Seattle Opera Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:45


Verdi's masterpiece returns to Seattle Opera May 2023. Initially this sumptuous, tuneful, utterly human tragedy sparked controversy, but it quickly became one of the world's most beloved operas. Seattle Opera Dramaturg Jonathan Dean introduces La traviata, with musical examples from previous Seattle Opera productions including 1996 (conducted by Gerard Schwarz and starring Gordon Hawkins and Lauren Flanigan), 2009 (conducted by Brian Garman and starring Francesco Demuro and Eglise Guttierez), and 2016 (conducted by Stefano Ranzani and starring Angel Blue).

Desert Tiger Podcast
Indie Folk artist Braden Lam on his track ‘Silence', & more!

Desert Tiger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:38


Award winning indie folk artist Braden Lam takes us behind his new track ‘Silence', his first collaboration which features indigenous rapper Wolf Castle!   Initially written as a personal and reflective take on relationships and the communication they require in order to survive, the song later expanded into a more socially focused track dealing with current social justice movements, and the noise made by the internet machine.    Highlighting the responsibility and privilege of those who choose to speak up and honouring those who have no choice but to be vocal, the final version of "Silence" is a current, impactful, and thought-provoking song, aimed at recognizing how staying silent or speaking up can define us.   We discuss the dance challenge the duo released for the track, preparing for the upcoming 2022 EMCA's, and much more!   Connect with Braden Lam! - - - - - - - - - -   Support Colton Gee and Desert Tiger ----- Check out our webstore @ Follow Colton Gee and Desert Tiger   -----

Rational Boomer Podcast
WHO LEAKED - RB369 - RATIONAL BOOMER PODCAST

Rational Boomer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 52:22


There is some question as to who leaked the Supreme Court's Draft Opinion regarding overturning Roe V Wade. Initially you would think it would have been maybe a liberal clerk. But as time passes it's looking like it may be a conservative. Maybe even Chief Justice John Robert. Let's get into it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rational-boomer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rational-boomer/support

Distribution Talk
Leveraging Legacy and Continual Learning with Jessica Yurgaitis of Industrial Supply Company

Distribution Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 40:16


The past is always present at Industrial Supply Company, thanks to a treasure trove of historical documents dating back to 1915. While the Utah-based company's 106-year heritage is impressive, Jessica Yurgaitis has no intention of dwelling in the dust of the organization's bygone era, even if the history major in her loves posting those old handwritten letters and sales slips. Jason chats with this fourth-generation president about balancing respect for family legacy with a desire to launch the company into a thoroughly modern future.  Initially, Jessica wanted no part in Industrial; she wanted a Master's in history instead. But advanced degrees cost money, so she went to work. In purchasing, Jessica learned business basics: meeting with suppliers, building relationships, and executing marketing and co-branding strategies. Moving through each department at Industrial taught Jessica how to strengthen relationships. “I feel like I have a wonderful network of people,” she says of her participation in associations like ISA. “I could pick up the phone anytime and call, and they'd be willing to give me time and help me work through an issue. And I do that all the time.”  She applies that same humility when the conversation turns to younger team members. Jessica has wisely surrounded herself with folks whose “digital native” skill sets complement her historical organizational knowledge. Leveraging legacy, leaning into growth. Jessica's got the balance right at Industrial Supply. CONNECT WITH JASON LinkedIn CONNECT WITH JESSICA LinkedIn *** For full show notes and services visit: http://www.distributionteam.com Distribution Talk is produced by The Distribution Team, a consulting services firm dedicated to helping wholesale distribution clients remove barriers to profitability, generate wealth and achieve personal goals.    This episode was edited & mixed by The Creative Impostor Studios.  Special thanks to our sponsor for this episode: INxSQL Distribution Software, integrated distribution ERP software designed for the wholesale and distribution industry.

The Hamilton Morris Podcast
A Discussion with Ethan Nadelmann about Drug Policy

The Hamilton Morris Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 113:30


Initially hoping to discuss the mechanics of how a drug is made illegal, I instead have a far-reaching discussion about drug policy with one of the greatest living experts on the subject. Top Tree Herbs Kratom Tea Bags Top Tree Herbs is the first kratom tea bag companyLucy Tobacco Free Nicotine Lucy's mission is to reduce tobacco-related harm to zero.Matcha.com Andrew Weil MD's matcha tea company. Use the code "Hamilton" for up to 20% off + a FREE gift.Apollo Wearable Save 10% on the Apollo wearable with coupon code HAMILTONSupport the show

Catching Up On Cinema
The Batman Masterclass - Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

Catching Up On Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 137:12


linktr.ee/CatchingUpOnCinema This May is “Masterclass Revisited” month at Catching Up On Cinema! All month long, we'll be revisiting the subjects of Masterclass months we've done over the years to review films that may have slipped through the cracks. First up this month is another tour of Gotham City, as we sit down to review Bruce Timm and Eric Radomski's, Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993)! Based on the groundbreaking Batman: The Animated Series cartoon, the film is the first feature length animated film in the long history of the character. Initially planned as a direct-to-video project that was later fast tracked and released on Christmas day in 1993, the film would ultimately be critically adored, but sadly a total bomb at the box office. Completed and released within a ludicrous 8 month production cycle, the film is fairly pedestrian in terms of cinematography and fluidity of animation, however most will agree it's “dark deco” aesthetic and glorious score by composer Shirley Walker more than make up for whatever technical shortcomings it may have. Boasting the same voice cast as the animated series, including the one-two punch of the inimitable Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill as Bats and Joker respectively, the film is a mature and focused affair, exploring aspects of the characters that would not be revisited in earnest for over a decade. Follow us on Instagram @catchinguponcinema Follow us on Twitter @CatchingCinema Like, share, subscribe, and we'll catch you next time!

Clowning Around Podcast
Speaking with Nick Gold

Clowning Around Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 52:34


How can we be professional speakers?  How has the world of speaking changed since COVID?  What are the things that make some speakers great?  What has Barbara done that has changed her world?  How can Lisa Stansfield be relevant for speaking? Join Em Stroud and her Clown Barabra as they chat all things Speaking with Nick Gold. Get in touch with Nick: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nickgold/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpeakersNick About Nick Gold: With a firm belief that successful events which deliver maximum ROI for both attendees and organisers can be held anywhere, even a cow shed, Nick Gold draws on his 20+ years consulting experience working with 8,000 speakers and servicing 1,000+ events per year to address the pain-points and opportunities that exist for event professionals.  With a background in the era of the first dotcom boom and bust, and then some more ‘grounded' work life with a major FTSE100 company in IT and project management, Nick found himself in the mid-1990s looking for the opportunity to grow his own company and create something new.  And so his story with Speakers Corner began. Initially a bespoke entertainment bookings agency, Nick has turned the business into a market-leading speaker bureau and consultancy working with 6,500+ speakers and servicing 1,000+ events each year, which sits at the heart of the events industry  Nick also manages the business with his brother Tim, which also makes him well placed to comment on how family and business can work together!  Nick Gold was the first British President of the International Association of Speaker Bureaus (IASB) from April 2020 – April 2021. Nick was formerly the Chairman of the EASB (European Association of Speaker Bureaus). He has spoken at major industry events including Confex and The Meetings Show, and has been published extensively across UK media outlets, including: The Telegraph, City AM, Huffington Post UK, GQ.com and Raconteur. He has also been interviewed by the BBC and LBC radio.  Before his Speakers Corner adventure began in the mid-1990s, Nick previously worked in the energy sector at Power Costs Inc. (PCI) and Centrica, where he specialised in project management, business development, business analysis and bid tendering.   A warm character who speaks with passion and authority on content, the events industry and measuring ROI, not to mention entrepreneurship, managing SME's, creating an inclusive culture and motivating a workforce to go above and beyond, Nick inspires audience interaction with questions from the floor during his sessions and delights in sharing stories with delegates after the talk has finished. 

Dear FoundHer...
How Your Story is Your Brand with Chrissy Fichtl, Founder and CEO of Apotheke

Dear FoundHer...

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 54:44


After losing her job in the recession, Chrissy Fichtl had a lot of free time on her hands. While searching for a new job, Chrissy was looking for a hobby to keep her entertained in the interim. After a quick search on Google, Chrissy stumbled upon homemade soap. Several hundred dollars, and many ruined pans later, Chrissy had finally perfected her recipe. What initially began as a hobby in her apartment, unexpectedly became Chrissy's full-time career. Today, she is the proud Founder and CEO of Apotheke, a home fragrance brand that generates over $12 million in revenue annually. Even though Chrissy's company makes home fragrance products, she believes that her unique story sets her apart from the rest. Initially known as the lady who sold candles at the Brooklyn Flea, Chrissy has utilized her personal experience as the inspiration for her brand. While Apotheke has grown and changed over the years, the philosophy and mission remain the same—to provide hand-poured fragrances for all of life's special moments. Tune into this episode of DearFound Her… to learn more about the importance of building relationships with your customers, establishing meaningful partnerships, and making life convenient so you can leverage your story and transform it into the brand of your dreams. Quotes: • “We are in 500 of the best little shops all across America. I can name every single one of them and I know every single person in all 500 stores.” (27:38-27:57) • “I think a healthy business today in 2022 is a healthy division of wholesale, direct to consumer, and having a retail shop.” (29:35-29:50) • “As a company, we're very connected to what's going on with our customers.” (30:12-30:17) • “An important part about growing your company is knowing what your brand stands for.” (31:16-31:21) • “We have some really amazing collaborations happening. It's amazing and I am smiling thinking about it. I think it's so great because they have the same type of pillars as us about their employees, where they source their ingredients, transparency, and price point.” (47:58-48:43) • “If you believe in what you can do, but you know you need a little bit of cash, as long as you know how to pay them back, then I suggest asking for the help.” (50:26-50:39) Connect with Chrissy Fichtl: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apothekeco/ Website: https://apothekeco.com/ Please don't forget to rate, comment, and subscribe to Dear FoundHer on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts! Stop spinning your marketing wheels and start building a community you can monetize. JOIN ME for Big Impact Marketing for Small Business, a new way to work with me. REGISTER HERE Want even more resources for growing your business? Want even more resources for growing your business? • Grab one of Lindsay's FREE quick small business marketing guides: https://www.lindsaypinchuk.com/freebie • Follow Lindsay on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lindsaypinch Use code FoundHer for 50% off your first month with both HiveCast and Fireside Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava
107 - My Journey as an Introverted Entrepreneur

Private Practice Elevation with Daniel Fava

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 32:42


In this special episode of The Private Practice Elevation Podcast, I'm going to crack open the book on a subject I don't talk a lot about… myself!   Over the years, I know I've shared bits and pieces of my story and how I started Create My Therapist Website and Private Practice Elevation.    Especially how I helped my wife get her private practice online and get her ideal clients to her website.   But I thought it would be fun to let you into all the little bits of it all and put all the pieces together from start to finish.   I know for myself I find so much inspiration in other business owners' stories.   There's so much we can learn from others' mistakes, highs and lows, and the lessons that they've learned from being in the trenches of building a business.   When I started Create My Therapist Website as a blog back in 2016, I had no idea that nearly 6 years later I'd have a podcast and build a website design agency for therapists.   Initially, I thought there would be more focus on online courses and webinars to help private practice owners DIY their websites.   While I still do those things, I've learned that I enjoy working with fewer people to create a big impact in their business through the services we offer.   But I never would have learned that if I hadn't started where I was.   And a big part of who I am and what my business looks like comes from my introverted personality.    I'm continuing to learn how to build a business that fuels my energy and plays to my strengths.   Because when I'm at my best, our clients benefit!   So in this episode, I'll talk a lot about what it means to me to be an introvert and how I used that strength in starting my business.    Whether you've been a listener for a while or you're new to this community, I hope that by listening we'll get to know each other better and that you'll learn some valuable lessons you can apply to build your own business. Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts If you're not yet subscribed to the podcast I want to encourage you to do that today. This is the best way to make sure you don't miss an episode! Click here to subscribe on iTunes.   And if you're feeling extra generous, I'd love to hear what you think about the podcast. Reviews help others find the podcast plus I'd really love to hear what you think! Click here to leave a review. Just click on “Ratings & Reviews” then “Write a review.” Let me know what you like best about the podcast. Thank you!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 73:14


How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything? We're going to talk about the Senate bill that has big tech scared, really scared. I'll talk about a new job site problem for a number of different industries because of hackers, the cloud, the cost and reliability. [Following is an automated transcript]  This tech bill. It has the Senate really scared. He is frankly, quite a big deal for those of you who are watching over on of course, rumble or YouTube. I'm pulling this up on this screen. This is an article. ARS Technica and they got it originally from wired it's it was out in wired earlier in the month. And it's pointing out a real big problem that this isn't just a problem. This is a problem for both the legislature. In this case, we're going to talk about the Senate and a problem for our friend. In big tech. So let us define the first problem as the big tech problem. [00:01:00] You're Amazon. You are Google. Those are the two big targets here of this particular bill. We're going to talk about, or maybe your Facebook or one of these other Facebook properties, et cetera. If you are a small company that wants to compete with any of these big guys, What can you do? Obviously you can do what everyone's been telling us. Oh, you don't like the censorship, just make your own platform. And there've been a lot of places and people that are put a lot of money into trying to make their own platform. And some of them have had some mild successes. So for instance, I'm on. You can watch my videos there. And there have been some successes that rumble has had and making it into kind of the competition to YouTube. But YouTube is still the 800 pound gorilla. Everybody wants to be where the cool kids are. So for most people. That YouTube. They look at YouTube as being the [00:02:00] popular place. Thus, we should be, we are obviously saw the whole thing with Elon Musk and Twitter, and the goings on there. And Twitter really is the public square, although it's died down a lot because of this censorship on Twitter. Interesting. So as time goes forward, these various big companies are worried about potential competition. So how do they deal with that? This is where the real problems start coming in because we saw Amazon, for instance, in support of an internet sales tax. You remember that whole big deal. The internet had been set aside saying, Hey, no states can tax the internet and that's going to keep the internet open. That's going to help keep it free. And people can start buying online. And that worked out fairly well. A lot of people are out there, why would Amazon support a sales tax on the internet? They are the biggest merchant on the internet, probably the biggest [00:03:00] merchant period when it comes to not just consumer goods, but a lot of goods, like a staples might carry for business. So they'd have to deal with what they're 9,000 different tax jurisdictions in the United States. And then of course all these other countries, we're not going to talk about them right now, but the United States 9,000 tax jurisdictions. So why would Amazon support an internet sales tax when there's 5,000 tax jurisdictions? The reason is it makes life easier for them when it comes to competition. So if you are a little. And do you want to sell your widgets or your service? Whatever it might be online. You now have to deal with 9,000 tax jurisdictions. It's bad enough in the Northeast. If you are in New Hampshire, if you live in New Hampshire and you spend more than, I think [00:04:00] it's 15% of your time south of the border and mass, then mass wants you to pay income tax for that 15% that you are spending your time there. Now they do that with the. Baseball teams with football teams, hockey, you name it, right? So the big football team comes into town. The Patriots are paying the New York jets or whatever it might be. The Patriots have to pay New York state taxes, income tax now because they stepped foot in New York heaven forbid that they try and do business there and help New York state out. And they now have to pay income tax. Now they only have to pay income tax for, or for the amount of time. They're more New York. Various states have various weirdnesses, but if you're only playing 1, 2, 3 dozen games a year, It isn't like your normal work here, which is 2080 hours. We're talking about their plane to New York and they're only spending maybe 10 hours working in New York, but that [00:05:00] represents what percentage, 10, 20, 30% of their income, depending on how many games they play and how they're paying. And so they got to keep track of all that and figure it out. Okay. We played in New York, we played in New Jersey. We're in mass. We were they weren't in New Hampshire, certainly the Patriots plane, but they got to figure it all out. Guess what? Those big pay. Football players, hockey, baseball. They can afford to have a tax accountant, figure it all out and then battle with them. I had a booth one time at a trade show down in Connecticut. Didn't say. Thing it was terrible trade shows, man. They aren't what they used to be. And they haven't been for a long time. This is probably a decade plus ago, maybe even 20 years ago. So I had a little booth, we were selling our services for cybersecurity and of course, nobody wanted to bother pain for cybersecurity who needs it. I haven't been hacked yet. [00:06:00] Although there's an interesting article. We'll talk about next week based on a study that shows. Small businesses are going out of business at a huge rate because of the hacks because of ransomware. And if you're worried about ransomware, I've got a really great little guide that you can get. Just email me, me@craigpeterson.com. I'll send it off to you, right? It's a free thing. Real information, not this cruddy stuff that you get from so many marketers, cause I'm an engineer. They'll go out of business. So they figured I haven't got a business yet, not a big deal. And so no body. There's big trade show. And I was so disappointed with the number of people that even showed up for this silly thing. So what happens next while I get back to the office and about a month to two months later, I get this notice from the state of Connecticut they're tax people saying that I haven't paid my Connecticut taxes yet. [00:07:00] And because I was in connected. I should be paying my income tax for that day that I spent and wasted in Connecticut. Oh. And plus every company in Connecticut that I'm doing business with now, I need to collect their taxes and pay them the taxes that I'm collecting for those Connecticut businesses are resident. I didn't sell a thing. You know what it took almost, I think it was three or maybe four years to get the state of Connecticut to finally stop sending me all of these threatening notices because I didn't get a dime from anybody in Connecticut. So I'd love the internet from that standpoint saying you don't have to collect taxes in certain cases, certain states, et cetera, unless you have a legal nexus or a legal presence there in the state. So back to Amazon, Amazon loves the idea of having everything on the internet packs. They love the fact that there's 9,000 plus [00:08:00] tax jurisdictions. When you get right down to city, state county Lilian, either local taxes, or you look at those poor residents of New York state, or they're poor residents out in Washington state that have to worry about that, right? There's county taxes, state sales tax. City sales tax, and income taxes are much the same, the, all of these crazy cities and states around the country. Yeah. The ones that are in serious trouble right now, they are those same ones. Those particular jurisdictions are hard to deal with. So from Amazon standpoint is just like the Patriots football players. We've got plenty of money. We've got teams of lawyers. We have all kinds of accountant. We can handle this and you know why Amazon really loves it because it provides another obstacle for any competitors who want to enter the business. That's the [00:09:00] real reason, so many big businesses don't go ahead and charge you serious money so that they can use that money against you. Okay. You see where I'm going with this? Because if you want to start a business that competes with Amazon, if you want to have a doilies, you're making doilies. My grandmother used to make them all the time and she had them on the toilet paper in the bathroom, little doily holders. Doilies everywhere. And then of course, the seashells shells on top of the toilet paper holders. If you want to do that and sell it, how are you going to deal online with 9,000 tax jurisdictions? All what you're going to do is you're going to go to Etsy, or you may be going to go to Amazon marketplace and sell your product there. An Amazon marketplace. So Amazon is taking its cut out of it at is taking it's cut off. And you still ultimately have some of that tax liable. [00:10:00] Amazon loves it. It's the same reason you see these groups forums, right? Barbers saying, oh, we've got to be regulated. Really you need to have a regulation in place for barbers. You need to have licensing for barbers. Why do they do that? They do that. Not just barbers, right? It's all of these licensures and various states. They do that really to keep people. To keep their prices high. That's why they do it because someone can't just put up a sign and say, Hey, I am now a barber. Come get a haircut. And if you don't like the barber, if they do a lousy job, you go elsewhere. We don't need all of the bureaucracy on top of this to enforce licensure. Anyways, when we get back, let's talk about that Senate. It's a big deal. And I am coming down in the middle of this thing. Hey, visit me online. Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com and get my special report on passwords.[00:11:00] We just talked about how big business uses its advantages to crush potential competition. Crush them. And it's a shame and it's happened to me and many people I know, and now the Senate's getting involved and making things worse.  This is a huge problem. This happened to me a number of years ago, and I will never forget it. It was a really big lesson for me. I had designed and written a computer system that would take the code that it was written for a much older system. And run it for much less money. So bottom line here, this was a system called Cade computer assisted data entry that was made by Sperry way back in the day. Yeah. I've been in there for that long and they had little programs, so they would not punch cards, but punch right on two tapes, those big [00:12:00] nine track tapes and that information would then be used for processing later on then. People, big businesses grocery stores, you name it. We're using that Sperry system. And I designed a system that would take their COBOL is what it was. It was a form of COBOL code from this cage system. And you could use my code to compile it and run it on a Unix system. So the cost involved here was that it would be cheaper to buy a whole new Unix computer and buy new terminals and do some slight training changes. But the key punch operators would be exactly the same keystrokes as they were already used to. Okay. So you know how fast they were, so it wouldn't slow than none at all. And their cost would be. Then just the maintenance contract on the old Sperry cage. Very [00:13:00] cool stuff. And I worked really well. Then I worked with a couple of sales guys at spirit because Barry had a Unix tower system. It was a mini computer that was Unix space. And I had one, I had saved up my money. We bought this thing. It was a lot of money nowadays. It'd be about a hundred thousand dollars I spent on that system and it was really great. Cool. So some grocery stores started using it. They used it to build the space shuttle to design it and send it into space. RCA, Astro space used it, my system, which is all really cool. So Sperry was interested in it saying, okay let's do this. Now. I had flown myself across the country too, because I was in California at the time to do some of this work for. The for RCA Astro space for the space program and help make sure it was working and get it installed, help them configure it and everything else. So [00:14:00] I had a lot of time, a lot of money, a lot of effort into this. It was a big venture. So Sperry invited me down to their headquarters down in blue bell, Pennsylvania to talk about this. And I was so excited because their sales guys wanted to sell it. They gave me some free space in a booth in Las Vegas. So I was in the Sperry booth with them and, say, yeah, you can buy this. And you're using the Sperry, the new Sperry hardware. And I went down there and talked with them. They never did anything with me, or, here's a huge investment young guy. And all of this stuff just worked and they had proof of concept. They had a couple of customers already using the system and it never materialized. And then about a year and a half later, I found out Sperry had tried to duplicate my system and had messed it up terribly. It [00:15:00] wasn't keystroke compatible. So anyone using the new Sperry system, they had to learn. Okay. So I got to hit this and I got to go over here and I got to click on this. Are you kidding me using a mouse? Aren't you not? These are data entry operators. They just go all day long, just typing and. They had stolen my ideas. They messed it up. They didn't do as good a job as I did, which turns out it's pretty common. And they had stolen it. They stolen years of my life. So I've seen that before with me. I've seen Microsoft do that with friends of mine, and I've seen apple do it with various products that they've decided to release. They all do it. Why do you think these businesses can not spend money on research and development, and yet at the same time, stay in business as technology's continuing to move forward? Why? The reason is. They don't have to do, or why [00:16:00] would we do T wait a minute. Now, all we have to do is either buy the company or steal the product just re-engineer. Oh. And if we want to buy the company, we can do what Microsoft has been accused of doing again and again, which is. We'll just Microsoft. Let's see here. I like that database is pretty darn cool. So here's what we're going to do. So Microsoft announces, Hey, we're going to have a competitor to that in coming out soon. And then they sit there and they wait and they say, okay, how many people are going to ask about, oh wow. A lot of people asking for it. In the meantime, that company that had that great little database soft. Trying to sell it. And people are saying, wait, Microsoft is going to come up with a version of this. I'm just, I'm going to wait. We can wait a few months. Let's see what Microsoft. So that poor company is now seriously struggling because this big company came out and made the announcement that they're going to do something like this. And then that small company gets a [00:17:00] knock on the door. Hey, we're Microsoft or company X. And we like your product. Wow. Okay. So we're going to do a buyout. We're going to we're just, oh, this is going to be fantastic. I might have to sign what a two year contract non-compete and help them manage it. Okay. We can deal with this. And then they find out that company X says Your company is not worth that much anymore. Your sales look at their sales here, man. They've gone way down. Okay. So let me see let's do a nickel on every dollar evaluation you had a year ago. This happens every day, worldwide in America, it should never happen to anyone. And as you can tell, it upsets me. So what are Klobuchar and Grassley doing here? Amy, when she was running for president, she made this big deal. I'm going to pull us up on my screen. Those of you who are watching [00:18:00] on rumble or YouTube. And you can find all of that in my website, Craig peterson.com can see here. So they are trying to protect the American consumer, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's it. They're gonna protect us. And so what they're doing is saying that. Would a rule ruin Google search results because that's what Google says. Is it going to bar apple from offering new features, useful ones on the iPhone? How about Facebook? Will it stop them from moderating content? So the legislation's core idea is we will just. The marketplace take care of things. We're not going to let Amazon put their products in the product listings before third parties, but how are you possibly going to be able to regulate that stuff you can't, you can regulate it [00:19:00] talking about a bureaucracy. You'd probably need one about as big as the federal government is right now. And the federal government needs to be cut back in a major way. There's this two months. How about the 150 million Americans? This article brings that up to that are currently using Amazon prime, even though the price one hump. And they have it free to prime members. It's this is a big deal. The bill doesn't mention prime. Doesn't mention Google by name, Amazon. But this is going to be a nightmare to enforce the bill is not specific enough. It should be voted down. And between you and me, I don't know what can be done about this other than to have additional marketplaces show up online. And you know what the conservative social media sites are starting to win. So maybe there's hope. We've got two things we're going to talk about right now. One of them [00:20:00] is tech jobs. And man, is there a lot of scamming going on there as you might expect in the second is cloud, are you looking at cloud services? Hey, a home or business.  You can see this. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for those watching on rumble or on YouTube, but this is a big problem. And we've seen this again and again right now, they're going after certain workers in the chemical. The sector, but it isn't just the chemical sector. What we've seen is the bad guys going after anyone that's applying for a job. So let me give you a few tips here. First of all, you should not be pain to apply for a job. We see that all of the time when it comes to the head hunting firms, what. Is, they will charge the business who is looking to hire someone [00:21:00] that makes sense to you. They'll hire they'll charge the business. So oftentimes it's a percentage of the annual salary committee where from usually 20% up to a hundred percent or more, depending on the position. And boy can, they make a lot of money, but they don't necessarily place. People, but you know how it is right now, there, there can be quite a few. So people have been applying for jobs to make a lot of money and not realizing that fee that supposedly they have to pay is illegitimate. So remember that. Okay. The second thing has to do with this particular scam, because what they're trying to do is. Into some of these companies. So they will send a thing out saying, Hey, on my head hunter, I'm here for you. We're going to get you this job you need to apply. Are you interested in a new job now? I've seen some stats online saying [00:22:00] that somewhere around 30 plus percent of people are looking or at least open to. Take getting a new job, which means a lot more are looking for jobs. Now I have to add to that, that the people who have jumped ship over the lockdown period really are not happy. The majority of them wish they had stayed where they were at. So keep that in mind too. But what they'll do is they'll say, Hey, listen. Oh, there's this new feature on LinkedIn. By the way, you can say y'all are, I'm interested in looking for a job. I forget exactly what it says, but it goes around your picture and I have it up there because I'm a contractor, I go to businesses and I'm. To harden their cybersecurity. And we usually start slowly, especially with some of these startups we're doing work with right now where they won't, they go from a completely flat network and [00:23:00] it's all engineers and I don't want anything hindering anything. And so you got to work with them and it's just, we had a time sort of a thing. Okay. I just had this one thing this week. And then move on to one thing next week as well. So that's what I do for a living. And a lot of people are looking on LinkedIn and other places to find people who can be a chief information security officer. So I'm what you call a fractional chief information security officer. I do this under contract and I've been doing contracts and contract work for. I don't know if I shouldn't be on the air, but my gosh it's been now I guess it's 40 years right now. So I've been doing this for a long time. So I'm familiar with some of these scams, so they didn't take my word on some of this stuff. So what they do is they say, Hey, we've got a potential job opening. Are you in interested now? When we talk about 30 plus percent of people polled [00:24:00] say that they're looking interested in a new job, the numbers are probably a little higher. Not that everyone's going to jump ship. Some people will, but there are a lot of people that if they get this email, they're going to open it up. And so what'll happen now is this group out of North Korea called the Lazarus group? And we've talked about them before. We'll go ahead and say yeah, the here's, what's going to happen here. Let's just send you this thing. You can open it up. You can look at it and see if it's really a fit for you. I love this graphic that they have. This is from dark reading. I have it up on the screen again. Rumble and YouTube. What should we do now? Should I open this up? Should I not open it up? It turns out that what's happening is that Symantec and Broadcom, both have noticed this and stated in an advisory a couple of weeks ago. Be very careful [00:25:00] because what it's going to do is install a Trojan horse on your computer. So let's think about this. You're talking about the chemicals. You have a lot of people who are very technical. And if a company wants to get some new technology, we talked about this earlier in the show, what did they do? Do they just go and say, oh, okay, let's get some R and D going here. Let me research and development. Let's hire some scientists and do some pure science here, which are almost never happens anymore. No, what they do is they either buy a company, they steal a company's idea. If you are like the communist, you try and steal the technology directly. And that's exactly what these guys are doing. They put a Trojan on your machine because you open that file and that Trojan then gives you. Oh, excuse me, gives them access to your machine. Now this particular Trobe Trojan is a malicious [00:26:00] web file. Disguises. This job offer and your machine gets comparable. They attempt to compromise it, right? It's not always successful. They're not as many zero days out there for these lower level actors like North Korea, but they've been able. Now, they're not just going after chemical sectors, they're going after it service providers. So companies like mine that provide managed security services for businesses, they are being attacked. So that's a problem too, isn't it? Because if you can compromise. A nine company and we've seen this all the time. It's getting reported like crazy. You now have access to all of their customers because the it service company has passwords, et cetera. And they're probably using. Industry is number one or number two products for managing the customer's computers, neither of which are secure. [00:27:00] And that's the biggest problem that we've had. We use some of these things before, I'm not going to name them right now because it wouldn't mean anything to you anyways, but we had to get. We worked with our, it people inside the software companies that make the software that are used by the managed services providers. And we'd talked with their developers and said, Hey, listen, this is a serious problem. That's a serious problem. You've got to change this. You got to change that. And what ended up happening? We left them because they weren't doing what they were supposed to be doing a very big deal. So they're targeting defense, contractors, engineering firms of any sort. They want to steal IP, intellectual property, pharmaceutical companies. Yeah. Very big deal. These third hunting teams, including Cisco's, which are the guys that we use. Tallow sets again, an example of a big company buying a smaller company called telos that does threat intelligence and it looks at stuff. They're all reporting to this. [00:28:00] So high level jobs in an industry or what you have to watch out. It'd be very careful. Now, earlier this year, Lazarus group, again, North Korea went after some of these jobs people 250 that were identified working in the news media, software vendors, internet infrastructure providers, using job offers that appeared to come from. Disney, Google Oracle by the way, that was according to Google who tracked the campaign. They know what their employees are doing, where they're going, what emails coming in. It's crazy. We're looking a lot of stuff. Okay. So I want to move on to the next topic here. Last one, this hour, but I'm gonna pull this up right now on my screen. You can have a look at it there. Of course, if you are at home. You can or you really can't on the road. You can see this on rumble and also see this on the YouTube [00:29:00] site. At least for the time being until I get kicked off right. Kicked off again. That seems to be the word of the hour, but cost reliability are raising concerns in. Again, this is a dark reading article, came out a couple of weeks back here, but the biggest concerns about cloud computing to what is cloud computing. Let's talk about that first for a minute. Cloud computing is going online using something like salesforce.com. People don't think of that as cloud computing. But you have in Salesforce, all the communications with all of your customers, et cetera, that's an example of a platform as a service, basically. So they're providing you with everything and it's up in the cloud, nothing to worry about here, folks, but of course you have the same potential problems. You do outs where people use what's it called now? Microsoft 365. Which Microsoft disclaimed [00:30:00] any liability for any problems they cause for anything customers it's really crazy, but again, what are the problems there? Reliability slash performance, 50% of the people, 50% applaud on the screen. Again here worried about reliability and performance, because if your business is relying on cloud computing, What, how is the security any good? That you could use something, as I mentioned Salesforce, and just picking them out of a hat and not, they haven't been like a terrible provider by any stretch. But how about if you're going to Azure and you're using a workstation news here? How about if you're going to some other place, right? It could be Amazon web services. Google also has data processing services. Security's huge issue. Cost is a huge issue, reliability, performance, all of those. We're issues with more than 50% of the it [00:31:00] professionals. I'm surprised that this next one, which is our staff skillset on dealing with cog computing 26%. The reason I'm surprised by that is hardly anybody knows enough about cloud computing. Do we really confident about it? I'm serious about that. There's some companies right now, we're talking with a company called Wiz and they audit Azure configuration. So be very careful if you're using. Particularly if you're a business, it may not work out well for you. Hey, make sure you go online right now. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Sign up. You'll get my newsletters. You'll get all kinds of great information. Absolutely free Craig peterson.com including my special report on passwords. Now, if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [00:32:00] There is a whole bunch going on when it comes to Russia, of course, invasion of Ukraine. We're going to talk about that. And what is I can, how does this domain system work and why are people calling to have dot R U deleted? This is really a big deal. And if you're watching from home, I'm going to go full screen on this article. This is an article from ARS Technica, and I've been talking about it all week, which is that I can won't revoke Russian in Jeanette domains, says the effect. Devastating. This is frankly pretty darn fascinating to me because I can, as this international organization, it was put together in order to help make the internet international. And I'm not talking about the data international, but control of it. A lot of countries work. Because of [00:33:00] course the internet was created in that states. It was created by us tax payers, money for the DOD. And it was designed to be very resilient, in fact, so resilient that there could be a nuclear blast and that nuclear blast and. Causing problems, but yeah. Yeah, the internet is still going to work. And the whole idea behind it was you could have multiple routers. They're all talking to each other nowadays. They're talking BGP four and they can say, how can I get from here? To there. And so the idea behind BGP is they all share this information once the least cost way. What's the easiest way to post way. If you will, for me to get from point a to point B and it changes all the time. So you might be on a phone conversation. You might be listening to me right now, online streaming or watching the video you might be doing, who knows what [00:34:00] out there with digital communications. But the communications channel that you think you're using, where the data is going from, let's say my microphone, ultimately to your device, your ears, that data path, once it becomes dated. Can be changing multiple times a second. Now it actually changes quite a bit. Initially as these internet backbone routers, send the least cost, routing information back and forth to, and fro a very good thing, frankly, because it helps to speed everything up. And there's other tricks that we're using you. Might've seen. For instance, Akamai and some of the URLs before have sites that you've gone to, and that's called a content delivery network and that helps get the content to be closer to you. So if you're on a website in California and you're in New Hampshire, that website video, that website graphic, et cetera, is going to be coming from [00:35:00] a server local to me here in New Hampshire. All right. That's how that all is supposed to work. So we have names you guys know about that internet, domain names and those domain names. You already know those are turned into internet addresses, and those addresses are then used by the routers to figure out where to go, how to get the data. The problem that we're having right now, of course, is Russia seems to be substantially abusing the intranet Putin, put a kill switch on to the Russian internet sometime ago. And the idea behind the skills, which was, Hey, listen, if we don't want the world to be talking to us, we'll just cut it. Now he's tested it a couple of times, but what he has not done is shut it down and he hasn't shut it down. As part of this Ukraine, more, what they did is they passed laws saying, Hey, if you publish something that [00:36:00] disagrees with what we're saying, you get 15 years. And even these people who've been protesting on the streets, they're getting a bound 60 days, 30 to 60 days in jail, just for protesting what's going on. So a lot of people have been saying why don't we just, we turn off the Russian internet now we're not going to use Putin's kill switch in order to shut it all off. We're not going to do a well, a few things. She decided not to do, denial of service attacks, et cetera. Although there are hackers doing that and we are going to talk about that today, but they're saying what? Let's just go ahead and let's kill their dot R E. The country domain. And I can, the guy who heads it up said, Hey, listen our mission is just to make sure that the internet works. So shutting off the dot R U domain so that no one can go ahead and. We send right. A [00:37:00] request out to the domain name servers and get a resolution to an IP address. So if you try and go to Kremlin dot REU or something, you will get blocked and you will get blocked. Not blocked. No, I like the great firewall of China or of Russia. Now they've got one going pretty good. Yeah. Thank you. You ain't using us technology. It's crazy. What we've. But what it does is it says, oh, I hide dot, are you, I don't know. What are you talking about? So there have been a lot of people who have been pushing for it. And you'll see, on my screen here, that Ukraine is requested to cut Russia off from some of these core parts of the internet. And I can, which is the internet corporation for assigned names and numbers. I couldn't remember what that was earlier said that I can must remain neutral and their mission they say is not to take punitive actions. It's to make sure the internet works. So are they really taking punitive actions [00:38:00] of the cat Russia off? It's really interesting to me because look at what has been going on. You've got companies like Facebook as the great example who has gone ahead and just shut off people. They didn't like what they were saying. My goodness. At one point of you said you should wear a mask during this pandemic. You would be cut off from Facebook. And then of course, if you said, no, you don't, you shouldn't don't need you, you shouldn't wear a mask that at that point you would be cut off, because science right. Sciences, we know exactly what we're doing now. It goes on and on. If you said that it came from a lab in China, you would have your account suspended. Now of course their whole tune has changed and yeah probably came from a lab in China. It's crazy what these people have been doing. So we have arbiters of truth, who are some contractors sitting in their home or wherever it is the contractors for Facebook [00:39:00] that are going through posts that people are flagging as Incorrect as fake news. So what happens is people say fake news and then that goes off to their team that then looks at it and says okay. Yeah, fake news because we disagree with it. It just blows my mind. We have to have free and fair and open discussions. Don't we. You have that line at Facebook and Google does some of the same. A lot of these sites do a lot of the same. You get our major media outlets that are all deciding what they want to report on and what they want to label as fake and fake news. I'm just shaking my head because it's hard. It's hard to believe. What about. Russia is putting out fake news, as I've said many times before the first casualty in war, this isn't my quote. The first casualty in war is what, it's the truth. So if [00:40:00] truth is the first casualty, then that means we've got a lot of propaganda going on. We had propaganda coming out of Ukraine. We've caught some of those, like the, what was it? The. Chat goes, fighter, pilot, whatever it was who had killed, what was it? Five Soviet or Russian jets, Soviet era using silver deer, techno era technology on the part of the Ukrainian turns out well. Okay, that, that was false news. That was fake news. The whole thing about snake island, where you had that Russian military. I know what it was a frigging but anyways boat sitting there saying we are a Russia. Warship, you will surrender or, whatever. Do you remember that snake on just the small place, 13 guys and supposedly they shelled it and they killed all 13 turns out that was probably fake news as well. So that's from the Ukrainian side and on the Russian side they hardly reported I as to how many.[00:41:00] The we're in fact, initially for quite a while, they were saying there are no desks. Then at the same time, the Ukrainians are saying they're 2,500 Russians dead. And that number keeps going up, who knows what it is today. It gets really crazy in the time of war. So if Facebook is going to stop someone from saying don't wear masks or do wear masks, depending on what day of the week it is basically right. Wednesday. It's okay to say that Thursday is not okay to say that we're back. No it's not. Or then why can't that type of censorship? Move on to the next. I that's a big question I have now. Should we be shutting it off? I'll pull this back up on the screen again. And it, this article from ARS, Technica is saying that experts have warned, whoever they are that shutting down the dot R U domain. Is going to cause just incredible problems [00:42:00] for Russians, which man would it ever talking about a major blow to the economy. And it would also cause problems for people who are trying to find out more truth about. Russia cause you couldn't get to their site. Now we've seen some amazing things in Russia. We had the Russian, one of the Russian news agencies T, which is broadcasting and here in the U S that their entire staff just walked out saying, forget about it. We're not going to promote this fake news, but this is a little bit different question. Me personally. I don't think anybody should be censoring any. For almost anything. Yo, there are some limits, but they're pretty extreme in my book. I'd rather know someone is an idiot because they're allowed to say stupid things, and counter, counter it, counter their arguments. You've got to have discussions anyways, stick around. We'll be [00:43:00] right back. Microsoft. Yeah, they've been around a long time. They've been helping us. They've had lots of cybersecurity problems. People use Microsoft software on their desktop. Some people use it for servers, which is crazy, but listen to what they're doing now. This is a little concerning. I'm going to pull this article up on the screen. For those of you who are watching a long, either on rumble or YouTube ARS, Technica article, they have some really great articles. This particular one is about our friends at Microsoft. This is cool. Microsoft announced today? This was like a week or so ago that Microsoft would be suspending all new sales of Microsoft products and services in Russia. Following the countries, unjustified, unprovoked, and unlawful invasion of. Now Microsoft [00:44:00] didn't give any specifics about the products, but it really is likely to be a blanket ban of all of the Microsoft products. This is very cool because Microsoft has taken an approach I've never seen them do before, which is okay. When. Gets hacked. You get our friends at apple, putting together patches and getting them out. They get them up pretty quick. Microsoft had been doing much the same. The problem was some months there were patches every day that you had to apply. That's how bad this software is. And they decided that man, let's be like politicians here. Let's release some very damning news Friday. At about 4:30 PM before a long weekend. So no one will notice. Yeah. Y'all are friends of politicians do that all the time. What Microsoft decided they do is, Hey, wait a minute. We know we're going to have patches. [00:45:00] It's not going to slow down. And because our code is terrible. So what we're going to do, let me see here. How about we just release all of them at once and we'll just call it patch Tuesday, right? Because people were complaining about how much work it was, how much effort was effort. It was to try. They hate them. These machines apply these patches every day. Huge problem for everybody from home users to big companies out there. So Microsoft has said, okay let's do that. Let's burry it. So nobody will notice okay that's what Microsoft does. And now we've gotten used to that. Now we have. We remember two guys, right? Bill gates followed by Steve Ballmer. Steve Bohmer was a nut job. Bill gates was a bad man. I think he's just been trying extra hard to compensate for all of the evil he did over the years. But what we're looking at now is new management and that he's been in [00:46:00] there now for a few years, doing a great job, cleaning up Microsoft, making it a very competitive company. He has done some amazing things. One of the things that he has decided to do, that's been very effective is how about this? How about we go ahead. And we work with various governments to help stop these Russian hackers. And I mentioned this a couple of weeks ago, what was happening and the Microsoft had reached out to the white house and said, Hey, listen. What we have been looking at the hacks that have been coming from the Russian hackers, and we've been preparing fixes for some of those hacks. How about we work directly with some of these other countries? This reminds me a whole lot of the lend lease program in world war two. You might remember this thing, but the [00:47:00] us of course, initially was not involved in the war and they decided, okay we've got to help the United Kingdom. How are we going to help them? The UK doesn't have the money to buy ships, to have us make weapons, bullets know. What they did is they had people donate the rifles, the guns ammo from home. Plus they made them the government, instead of selling them to the UK, they lent them to the UK because the UK could not afford everything that it needed in order to fight a war against the national socialist in Germany. So what did they do? We just shipped the stuff over there and called it a lend slash lease. I think that's a great idea. And what Microsoft is doing is also great idea. They have been decoding, reverse compiling, if you will, and interpreting the code, looking at what some of the ransomware and other malicious code the Russia has [00:48:00] been using against Ukraine, and they have been providing. All kinds of insight information to these other countries. Now, this is a great idea for a few reasons, one of the reasons, and I think maybe the biggest reason is that the ransomware, the viruses, all of this malware that they're producing is. Not particularly discriminating. Do you guys remember maybe I dunno, what was it? Six months ago, I taught, told you how to avoid getting most of this Russian ransomware. And it was as easy as just installing. Yeah, installing a keyboard on your computer windows or Mac, windows. Those are the machines are always getting attacked quite successfully most of the time, but the windows keyboard. Russian language. Now you didn't even have to use it. [00:49:00] You don't have to have a keyboard, right? This isn't a Russian keyboard that I'm holding up here on camera. This is just a regular us keyboard. You can just install a virtual, Russian keyboard. And once that keyboard was installed, you're pretty safe. Why? Because Vladimir poop. Dictator for life of Russia decided he would just go ahead and stop anybody that was trying to hack Russian. Companies businesses, government agencies and what's the best way for the hackers to do that. Cause they didn't want to end up in Siberia for the rest of their lives because of a hack. Now they went ahead and said, okay if there's a Russian Cyrillic keyboard on the machine, we're not going to activate. So if the software, the malware on your computer, all you need to do is have a Russian keyboard. Yeah, that's it pretty simple. I told you that months ago, now what we're seeing is these indiscriminant [00:50:00] types of software that are being used in Ukraine. Why doesn't the keyboard trick work while some of Ukrainians peak Russian, we could go in. To the background on that of the massacre, the starvation purposeful starvation of Ukrainians by the Soviet union over many years ago. And how they then gave their property, their homes to Russians to move into in order to occupy Ukraine. So there's people in Ukraine who are Russian speaking of course. Now we're talking two or three generations, four, maybe down the road from when the Soviet union killed all of those millions of people. But there are some fights that to say, there's Russians, Russian speaking people there. Let me put it that way. Perfectly. In Southeastern Ukraine anyways I'm going on and on I, this is not an education on war or history. This we're talking about [00:51:00] cyber security. So the, they have, they been, Microsoft found many cases of Russians putting destructive. And disruptive or even more than that data wiping malware onto computers, it spreads indiscriminately. So Microsoft looking at what's happening, you crane, trying to get patches together for all of us, letting other countries know about what's going on is going to be. Amazing because this malware, which is wiping computers, primarily, it's not really just straight up ransomware give us money and we'll give you your data back. This is just showing your data, that malware is going to leak outside of Ukraine. Yeah. Cause us all kinds of book tension, probably. When we get back, I want to talk about this here. This is our friend Ilan Musk, and we've been following [00:52:00] along with some of the stuff been going on with his new satellite system in Ukraine. Stick around. The whole concept of these satellites and circling the earth, providing us with internet, just regular guides. It's going to be in our smartphones is changing everything. We're going to talk about Elon Musk and what's happened over in Ukraine.  Our friend Elon Musk has done a lot of things over the years. He has really helped us for frankly, the Tesla and what's been happening there. SpaceX, his main concern being let's get off of a single planet on to multiple planets, right? The movement to Mars, NASA's working on a serious moon base. I reminded him of space 1999. You guys remember that show, but yeah, we're going to have a moon base by then [00:53:00] and it makes a lot of sense. So who's going to go to these well, there's some interesting lotteries people have to apply and everything else, but he's done so much, right? He's got the boring company you'd already know about Tesla and boring company in case you didn't know makes underground tunnels. He has also. A few other things has got a huge battery manufacturing facility. They're working on new battery technologies to make all of our lives a little bit better, particularly if we have an electric house or electric car, because this is what good is it to have electricity that you can't use. And that's really what they're trying to do is make it so that electricity is available 24 7 for you. And. Those space X, which is what I mentioned as well as what we're going to talk about right now. I'm going to pull this up on my screen. For those of you who are watching over on rumble, or of course, YouTube, this is fascinating. He [00:54:00] said there's a high probability of Russian attacks on Starlink in Ukraine. Now that is fascinating because what he's done is he has sent over truckloads. I'm showing a picture of a truck. In fact, with these Starling terminals in it, that's from ARS Technica. Just double-checking it here, but this is very cool. This is posted by the vice prime minister over there in Ukraine. And they are talking about these terminals. Now a terminal in this case is something that allows your devices to talk to the Starlink satellites, or there's going to be a huge constellation. They've got 2000 satellites up and they're putting another 12,000. These types of satellites are much different than what we've been used to over the years. We were typically, we've had these massive things sitting up in space. [00:55:00] I worked with RCA Astro space many years ago and I saw. They're testing facilities, which are just incredible. They had this huge vacuum chamber that they brought me in to see as we were working on space shuttle software. Yeah. I wrote software that they used to put the space shuttle together yeah. Way back in the day. So that was a pretty proud moment. Anyways. It's we're not talking about these huge satellites, like they used to launch, we're talking about very small cell. And they're not just sitting way, way up there. These are in basically in low orbit around the earth and they're geostationary. In other words, they stay in one spot. I believe this is the way they've got these things set up. So these satellites then allow because they're so close to the earth, allow them to use less power. And also the other advantage to that is.[00:56:00] The delay, right? The delay between having to send it all the way up and back down, because electricity takes time, right? Yeah. Travels at the speed of light. But nowadays you might've noticed it can take your quarter second, half a second. When you're talking to someone, when I'm on the radio with some of these radio stations or the delay can be absolutely incredible. Like I half second to a second sometimes. And that's just because they're being cheap. This type of technology where you have these constellations and it isn't just Elon Musk. It isn't just Starling, but constellations with will ultimately we'll have tens of thousands of satellites up there. Not, there's all kinds of other potential problems not getting into that right now. But what it does mean is yes. Can communicate and we've never had this sort of thing before we had the us military, the Navy in fact, put together a communication system that [00:57:00] lives on top of the internet and called nowadays. Generically the dark web. And it was set up to allow our military, our state department to be able to communicate with people in countries that are back in the day under Soviet control, all kinds of potential problems. So whenever those problems existed, they just went ahead and used this onion network, which is a part of the dark web, et cetera, et cetera. So let's say we had before. Now what happens if you're a country like Ukraine, where 100% of your internet comes from Russia, Russia obviously can sit there and listen in. Hopefully your encryptions. Good. A lot of Russians have been using telegram and already get real news about what's happening in their country and other places. And Della Graham is not that secure, frankly. WhatsApp pretty secure signal is the [00:58:00] one you want to pay close. Attention to signal is considered to be the most secure of all of these secure communications apps. But there's a level above all of that, because if they can tell that you're communicating, even that is enough to give them some information. So they might not know what was in that transmission, but if the transmission is all of a sudden, a tons of activity coming over, lots of data, lots of messages going back and forth, they can say maybe there's something about to happen. That came out. You might remember the old orange book for security way back in the eighties, I think is when it came out. But part of what you had to do was cover up your. Actual real communication. So it's one thing to have the communications encrypted, but you wanted to always have about the same amount of communications going back and forth. So people couldn't figure out what you're doing now with these types of devices. That [00:59:00] kind of problem still exists. And this is part of what Elon Musk is warning about here. Pull it up on my screen again, for those people who are watching Elon Musk is urging users of his satellite system to put their Starlink antennas as far as. From people as possible. Now, why would he be doing that? Because frankly, that terminal is transmitting to the satellite as well as receiving from the satellite. And it is entirely possible that there could be some evil software that is listening in for the satellite transmissions and sends a little missile your way. Also, of course the Russians have satellites in space that can look down on the ground. Now it's something as small as a terminal four Starlink, little hard to see, but Elon Musk is saying, Hey, listen guys, [01:00:00] go ahead and camouflage it. You might want to spray paint. It just don't use metallic paint so that they can't see it and place it as far away from where people are as post. So you can still use it and only use it when you need to use it. Don't keep it up and running all the time. But this is the start of something great. Something where you can't easily block people's communication. So Russia has tried to do. And they have been jamming the Starlink satellites. So what did must do? He delivered all of his engineers to working on how can we get around the Russian Jack? And according to Elon Musk, they have gotten around it and they now have their satellite systems completely jammed free from the Russians. I think that's fascinating. They're probably using some good spread spectrum technology that was actually known about it and world war II. And then we can talk [01:01:00] about that for a long time. Heady, you might remember her anyways, skip that for now. Stick her out. We got more when we. A whole bunch of pandemonium out there because of what Russia's been doing in Ukraine and how it's flowing over to us as well. Hey, this is not great news. Pandemonium is the name of the game over there in Russia. And they are being very successful. We're going to talk about what happened in Bella ruse. We'll talk a little bit about what happened in Ukraine with cybersecurity and what's happening right here right now.  I'd also like to invite you guys to listen to me on all kinds of apps out there, including the tune-in app and many others. Let me get my screen set up because now you can also catch me on. And on YouTube, this is almost [01:02:00] a complete, let me pull this up for you. There we go. Complete ARS Technica today. They've got some great articles this week, looking into the Russians. What are they doing? What kind of problems is that causing us? But we are seeing some interesting attacks back on. And back in very big way. Russia has been going after you crane in the cyberspace for a long time, we spoke a few years ago about what Russia had been doing with the tax software for Ukraine. We don't do this in the us or in Canada, but my number of European countries do you, where you have to have. The old official tax preparation software put together by the government for your business or for your person, depending on the country you're living in [01:03:00] France is a great example of this. And Ukraine is another one. So Ukraine says, Hey guys, you got to go ahead and use our software. That means every business in Ukraine is using their software. To manage their tax payments and their accounts, frankly. And that wonderful little piece of software was hijacked by our friends in Russia. So they grabbed a hold of it. They in. Did some code into it that added rent somewhere to the software. So now all of the businesses in Ukraine are pretty much guaranteed to be using this hacked software. We have a client who has offices over in France, and we found a really interesting problem with them because. The French software that was being used for taxes for French businesses had an extra little [01:04:00] problem. And that extra problem was, it was insecure as can be whoever wrote this, must've taken a Microsoft programming course and had no idea DIA about the consequences of what they were. So it was very insecure. The, it was using a version of SSL, which is an encryption that's based on another type of increase. I don't want to get too wonky here, but that was just one of its many problems and bad keys, et cetera, et cetera. And keys by the way, was using keys that had been revoked, which you should never do. Bottom line. Oh my gosh. Hey, if you want more information on this, just drop me a note. me@craigpetersohndotcomandyoucanalsogetmynewsletterwithallkindsofgreatlittletipsmeatcraigpeterson.com. Just let me know. So in this case, we had to help that company in [01:05:00] France. Ignore the security restrictions that were on their systems so they could use the French tax system. So anyways, I told you that, so I could tell you that the same thing happened to Ukraine. In a different way, their software was pre infected. So when they downloaded it, ta-da. They got that piece of ransomware that virus had spread. It was just a nightmare. And of course it robbed. If you will, Ukraine, government of funds, that would have been. So we had now a bit of a shift. I'm going to pull this up on the screen again, this article, because what this shift has shown is that the hackers are now operating on the side of you. Crazy. Which is just fascinating. So the group called anonymous, you might be familiar with them. Of course, they've been doing a lot of hacking for a [01:06:00] lot of years, releasing private information, government and information. All of that sort of stuff. And they have a mast what they're calling a volunteer. It. And this it army has been going and doing what well hacking Russian sites apparently. So this article is just absolutely fascinating and they pulled some of from wired as well, but the Russian space research Institute, their website was hacked, leaked files that were stolen from the Russian space agency, made it all the way on to the. The space agency was hacked in their website said, leave Ukraine alone, Alto anonymous. Will you up even more? They also did. What's called a D O S. Which is a distributed denial of service attack. Those can be [01:07:00] very difficult to protect against unless you're set up in advance to help protect yourself. And that pretty much destroyed Russia's dot are you top level domain? So we've talked about how domain services work, right? So Doug are, you is like.com except dot R U is for running. And so the domain name servers that handled our, you were knocked off the air because no one could really get to them. They used amplifying attacks and stuff without getting into all of the details. So basically they were trying to cut off access and they did for a lot of people to any. That ended in, are you? It's great. These are just some of the latest in this surge of hacktivism. That's been going on one of the ones I mentioned a couple of weeks ago with the Belarusians deciding they were going to hack the Belarus railroad, which was being used. To bring Russian [01:08:00] troops, supplies, tanks, et cetera, all on rail, right on down right to the border of Ukraine. So that was hacked so that they couldn't use it in order to go after. Of course Russia was able to get to Ukraine, but there's also been protests around the world. 48 Russian cities raise millions of dollars through cryptocurrency donations. Now, I'm not a big cryptocurrency guy and I'm not a big crypto currency guy because while. Cryptocurrency is likely to be outlawed by most, if not all governments. And they certainly could shut it down and it is not anonymous. All right. So using cryptocurrency does not mean it does not equate to completely anonymous. They have done a lot of donations. They're big companies including, we [01:09:00] just talked earlier about Microsoft, but also apple shell, BP, a McDonald's Starbucks. And these hacktivists have really joined in. And w we talked about a couple of other things, so this is messy. Because even more than in peace time, these active combat that are really hacking happening right now, rendering, hacktivism, any effectual and largely just distracting because we are now in a hot war right now. Maybe we don't have our. Eric planes bombing Russian movements or other things, but there is a kinetic war going on over there. There are bullets, et cetera, mean exchanged. So the hacktivist efforts have been, visible. There's no question about that. But what have they done? See, [01:10:00] that's an advantage to being a country like Russia, or like the Ukraine, or excuse me, Ukraine, because both of those countries there, their industrial base, the military industrial base is not heavily automated unlike ours. What could you do? What can you shut down? So what you shut down the Russian space agency's website, how far did you get into it? Probably not very far. We also have a couple of groups and we talked about these guys many times the Conti group, which has been. Terrible and hurting us businesses, individuals, government agencies, and stuff, the Cuming project, both of them have declared their allegiance to Russia. You might remember a few weeks ago, we talked here about how we have had some researchers track down most of these Russian hacker groups and their money. And they all ended up in one building in Moscow. [01:11:00] No, that should tell you something, right? In fact, the most expensive real estate right there in downtown Los gal, the tallest building, et cetera. So these groups getting together in order to protect the father land there in Russia. Ah interesting problem. How much of this is really controlled by the Kremlin? It's a very good question. Context. Was dismantling its infrastructure. It, some of their top people were arrested by Putins military. Not military, but police state over there. And that was interesting too. That was again before the invasion, but why would Putin be shutting them down at all? Apparently they said some things. That they shouldn't have said. So now they've come out and have decided they're going to support Russia in its entirety. Now we mentioned Microsoft and how [01:12:00] Microsoft has decided they are going to protect other countries. As well as you crane, at least as far as the Russian malware goes, and they've been very active in that. And there are a number of cybersecurity companies and other organizations that have released free versions of some of their software, these digital defense tools. Free offerings. Our big cranes defend the networks. Google says it's human rights focus de dos protection service project shield is now in use by more than 150 Ukrainian websites. So it's very good. Bottom line propped up by the way, published this massive trove of personal data. Allegedly identifying 120,000 Russian soldiers deploy. In Ukraine that was Ukrainian prov, not the old good old Russian Sophia Pramata man. I [01:13:00] remember I bought one of those on new standing Canada once. And I had a friend who was from Yugoslavia and he said, oh, can I show that to my wife? He showed it to his wife. She tore it up. I said, I want my Pramata, Craig Peterson got calm.