Podcasts about Sapiens

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Best podcasts about Sapiens

Latest podcast episodes about Sapiens

SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human
SAPIENS Podcast Season 5 Trailer

SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2023 4:43


Being human is complicated. We require food and shelter. We have histories to contend with. We create rituals to control fate. We steal. We fight. We kill. We love. We shape the environment to suit our needs—sometimes with terrifying results. This season of the SAPIENS podcast embraces the diversity of human experience, digging deep into our human past and how we live today. The throughline of this season is the way in which humans use cultural beliefs and practices not only to explain the past but also to imagine the present and future. These stories aspire to understand how cultures can guide knowledge of human truths and help all of us to become seekers of wisdom. Join season 5's host, Eshe Lewis, on our latest journey to explore what it means to be human. Season 5 of the SAPIENS podcast was part of the SAPIENS Public Scholars Training Fellowship funded with the support of a three-year grant from the John Templeton Foundation.

Car Con Carne
Moon celebrates vinyl release of ‘Sapiens' at Livewire (Episode 821)

Car Con Carne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2023 16:45


David, Shen and Chris of Moon join me to chat about their fourth full-length, “Sapiens.” The album will finally see a vinyl release at the Moon show at Live Wire on 3/11 (also appearing: Rocket Miner & 5RVL5). We talk about the very personal nature of some of the album's songs, the joys of vinyl and what appropriate attire is for the 3/11 show.   If you're listening or watching in the Chicago area, it's no secret… winters here can be brutal and spring typically brings nasty storms.    For a homeowner, winters mean your gutters, windows and doors can take a beating and wind and hail can finish the job of infinite damage in the spring.    If you think you may have damages that could qualify you for a roof and or siding replacement through your insurance, talk to my friends at Suburban Roofing and Siding for a free 9 point inspection of your property exterior before you call your insurance company.    Let them assess any damages you may have and walk you through the steps of a claim, hassle free.    They're an accredited member of the Better Business Bureau with an A Plus Rating, and all their contractors are licensed, bonded and insured. They also use the highest quality materials available at no additional charge to you.   Call 224-677-6149 or visit them at Suburban Roofing and Siding dot com.   __ Car Con Carne is sponsored by Suburban Roofing and Siding, a family-owned company that provides interior and exterior home remodeling services, offering services to the Chicagoland area. Their staff has more than 40 years of collective experience.   Roofing, siding, windows, gutters...they do it all! Call their friendly team to get started today!    Call 224-677-6149 or visit SuburbanRoofingandSiding.com   __   Car Con Carne is also sponsored by Ninety Days in the 90s: A Rock N Roll Time Travel Story    Ninety Days in the 90s: A Rock N Roll Time Travel Story is the ultimate novel about the '90s and Chicago's music scene.   Join record store owner Darby on her trip back to 1990s Chicago as she jumps on the Grey Line to time travel back to her carefree twenties, soaking up all the pop culture and rock n roll nostalgia you could ever imagine.    https://90daysinthe90s.com/   __  

When Belief Dies
Erika (Gutsick Gibbon) on Neanderthals and Sapiens

When Belief Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2023 6:28


This is a clip from my upcoming conversation with Erika (Gutsick Gibbon) on 'The Human Story'. If you want to see/listen to the rest of this conversation in full right now, along with all other fully edited conversations that are waiting for release, then please consider supporting the show on Patreon. Cheers, -Sam ________Giving________ Patreon (monthly giving) PayPal (one-time gift) Bitcoin (one-time gift) As always - a massive ‘Thank You' to all the supporters of When Belief Dies! Without you, this wouldn't be possible. ________Social________ Twitter Website Email: whenbeliefdies@gmail.com ________Gear________ Camera (Sony A6400) Lens (Sigma 16mm F1.4) HDMI Adapter (Cam Link 4K) Microphone (RØDE PodMic) Audio Interface (Focusrite Scarlett 4i4 3rd gen) Microphone Amplifier (Cloudlifter CL-1) Recording & Interview Software (Riverside FM) #homosapien #paleoanthropology #neanderthals

BEMA Session 1: Torah
319: The Forgotten Women — Presentism and Primitivism

BEMA Session 1: Torah

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2023 46:43


Marty Solomon and Brent Billings are joined by Elle Grover Fricks to discuss how to navigate the dangers of presentism and primitivism as we start a series on the forgotten women of the Bible.Presentation for The Forgotten Women — Presentism and Primitivism (PDF)Sapiens by Yuval Noah HarariHomo Deus by Yuval Noah HarariBEMA 240: Sin and the Archaeology of Joshua w/ Elle Grover FricksLevant — WikipediaThe Red Tent by Anita DiamantBEMA 308: The Chosen S2E9 — “The Messengers”BEMA 310: The Nativity StoryBEMA 297: Kat Armas — Abuelita Faith

The Dirt Podcast
MINISODE 2: It's Just Archaeology

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2023 12:23


We're doing something different this week while Amber is on a whirlwind tour of life admin stuff. In response to some of the conflict over Graham Hancock's Ancient Apocalypse show on Netflix, Anna has been writing about the double-edged sword of creating archaeology content online. Social media can be a useful tool, but it can also be...well, not great. So, we figured, why not cover two types of content in one! The plan is to make a short series of minisodes out of the process of writing an article about archaeology for the public. We can talk to fellow content makers, editors, and others who contribute to the creative process. Let us know if you'd like to hear more of this kind of thing at thedirtpodcast@gmail.com! For extra context on archaeologists' response to Ancient Apocalypse: Anna's columns for SAPIENS: https://www.sapiens.org/?s=&column%5B%5D=field-tripsThe Familiar Strange on pseudoscience: https://thefamiliarstrange.com/2022/11/21/victorian-pseudoscience/Open letter from the Society of American Archaeology to Netflix: http://saa.org/quick-nav/saa-media-room/saa-news/2022/12/01/saa-sends-letter-to-netflix-concerning-ancient-apocalypse-seriesElla al-Shamahi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Ella_AlShamahi/status/1599474951823577088Dangers of pseudoscience: https://www.dw.com/en/netflix-ancient-apocalypse-series-marks-dangerous-trend-experts-say/a-64033733John Hoopes' comments on Hancock: https://news.ku.edu/2022/10/25/professor-can-comment-netflixs-ancient-apocalypse-how-pseudoarchaeology-can-reinforceAtlantis is a fictional city: https://www.thoughtco.com/platos-atlantis-from-the-timaeus-119667Bill Farley on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLFtC_OSpX4Flint Dibble's article on Ancient Apocalypse for SAPIENS: https://www.sapiens.org/archaeology/ancient-apocalypse-pseudoscience/

Rising To Be: Productive, Organized, and Inspired! Hosted by Christina B. Rising

0:00 Coming Up 0:30 Intro 1:01 Remember by Lisa Genova: https://amzn.to/3XJ8mgZ 2:00 brief history of nearly everything by bill bryson: https://amzn.to/3WLpZLS 3:27 Think Like a Freak by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner: https://amzn.to/3XK2X9F 4:50 Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari: https://amzn.to/3JmFrLm 6:01 Smarter Faster Better by Charles Duhigg: https://amzn.to/3Y4n9CV 7:11 Brief Answers to the Big Questions by Stephen Hawking: https://amzn.to/3jg6QEo 8:08 What If? by Randall Munroe: https://amzn.to/40eujGr 9:13 Quiet by Susan Cain: https://amzn.to/3H8BR4M 10:42 Bonus Book: From good to great by Jim Collins: https://amzn.to/3wE5Qga 11:51 Recap

Ideas Untrapped
Why Education, Electricity, And Fertility Matter for Development

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 81:36


Welcome to another episode of Ideas Untrapped. My guest today is Charlie Robertson, who is the chief economist of Renaissance Capital - a global investment bank - and in this episode we talked about the subject of Charlie's new book, "The Time-Travelling Economist''. The book explores the connection between education, electricity, and fertility to economic development. The thrust of the book's argument is that no poor country can escape poverty without education, and that electricity is an important factor for investors looking to build businesses. It also explains that a low fertility rate helps to increase household savings. Charlie argues, with a lot of data and historical parallels, that countries need at least a 70-80% adult literacy rate (defined as being able to read and write four sentences in any language) and cheap electricity (an average of 300 - 500 kWh per capita) in order to industrialize and grow their economies rapidly. Small(er) families (3 children per woman) mean households are able to save more money, which can improve domestic investments by lowering interest rates - otherwise countries may repeatedly stumble into debt crises. We also discussed how increasing education can lead to higher domestic wages, but that this is usually offset by a large increase in the working-age population - and other interesting implications of Charlie's argument.TRANSCRIPTTobi;The usual place I would start with is what inspired you to write it. You mentioned in the book that it was an IMF paper that sort of started your curiosity about the relationship between education, electricity, fertility, and economic development. Generally. So, what was the Eureka moment?Charlie;Yeah, the eureka moment actually came in Kenya, um, because I'd already done a lot of work showing how important education was. It's the most important, no country escapes poverty without education. So I'd already made that clear and there wasn't much debate about that. Perhaps there was a debate about why some countries have gone faster than others, but there wasn't much debate about that. The second thing I was very clear on was electricity, which kept on coming up in meetings across Sub-Saharan Africa, Pakistan, [at] a number of countries, people kept on talking about the importance of electricity. But the eureka moment came when somebody pointed out to me that Kenya, where I was at the time, couldn't afford to build huge excess capacity of electricity, which I was arguing you need to have. You need to have too much electricity, so that it's cheap and it's reliable.And then investors come in and say, "great! I've got cheap educated labour, and I've got cheap reliable electricity. I've got the human capital and the power I need, that then enables me to invest and build a business here." And the question then was, well, why was it so expensive in Kenya but so cheap in China? Why was the cost of borrowing so high in Nigeria but so cheap in Morocco or Mauritius? And when I was trying to work out where did the savings come from in China, uh, well I was looking globally, but China's the best example of economic success and development success we've seen in the last 50 years. Over half the answer came from this IMF paper saying, actually it came from their low fertility rate. That's over half of the rise in household savings, which are massive in China, came about because the fertility rate had fallen so dramatically.And I then thought, could this possibly be true for other countries as well? Could this help explain why interest rates are so high in Nigeria or Kenya and so low elsewhere? And the answer is yes. So this book, The Time Travelling Economist is bringing all of these three things together - the fertility rate, the education rate, and electricity - to say not just how countries develop, cause I think I've answered that, but when they develop. Because once we know those three factors are key, we can then work out the when. Not just in the past [of] countries, but also in the future. Um, so that's where this came from.Tobi;I mean, we're going to be talking about each of those factors over the course of this conversation, but another question...some would say boring question, but I know how development economists and economists generally always try to defend their turf, you know, around issues like these. So, has anybody like taking you to task on the causal link between these three factors and development? And how would you defend yourself against that were it to be asked?Charlie;I haven't found anyone yet who's argued successfully against these points. Um, the closest criticism I get, and just to say, you know, this book came about off the back of three key reports I did in 2017 on education, 2018 on electricity, and 2019 on fertility and savings. So I've now been talking about these ideas for three to five years. The book only came out in July, 2022, bringing them all together. But in five years I haven't had pushback other than people ask, "is it not correlated?" You know, "is it not perhaps economic growth leads fertility declines or boosts savings?" And I think I show really clearly in the data that "no." Um, the fertility declines give us the growth. You don't get growth without adult literacy of at least 40%, you certainly don't get industrialization until literacy is at 70 to 80.So, you know, I'm looking at the data and I think it's pretty crystal clear that you've gotta get these other things right first before your economy can take off. And I can't find any counter-examples. Except, I mean there's the inevitable few, those countries like Qatar or Kuwait with huge amounts of energy exports per capita or diamonds in Botswana's case. And there you don't have to get everything right before you get wealthier because you just happen to be lucky to have huge amounts of energy exports per person and a very small population. But they are a bit of an exception. I think you could probably argue that they do grow first before they get everything else right. But for the vast majority of the planet and all countries in history, it's the other way around. You gotta get education, power, fertility rates in the right place to take off.Tobi;So I mean, getting into the weeds, let's look at education first. Before your book, personally for me, and I should say what I really like about your book is, it's well written, it's an interesting read. It comes across as a bit less analytical, which is what you get from the standard development literature, you know, and I think that's partly because you are writing about a lot of the countries that you have also worked in and interacted with a lot of these factors. So it really gives it a first-hand experience kind of narrative. So I like that very much. So prior to your book, if someone were to ask me about the relationship between education and economic development or catch-up growth, generally, the reference usually goes to Studwell's big claim, Joe Studwell, that: Yeah. You don't really need a super high level of education metrics for a country to industrialize because the standard explanation is that how a relatively poor country starts industrializing is from the low-skill, uh, labour-intensive, low-skill manufacturing jobs, that you don't need a high level of education and skill for you to be able to do that.So what I wanna work out here is what is the transmission mechanism between adult literacy and industrialization the way you've, like, clearly analyzed in your book?Charlie;Well, thank you very much for saying it was nicely written, I appreciate that. I wanted to try and make it as accessible as possible. Yeah, I think Joe Studwell's books are really good and I think he's right that you don't need a high level of education to do that first step out of rural poverty, subsistence farming into a textile mill. I think what's interesting is how many people writing about development forget how important just adult literacy actually is, because we've taken [it] so much for granted. So Adam Smith, who wrote The Wealth of Nations, the father of economics back in the 18th century in Scotland, he didn't make a big deal about adult literacy driving growth. And more recently, you know, people like Dani Rodrik have echoed exactly that saying you don't need any great education to work in a textile mill. You just need to be dextrous with your fingers. Which is almost exactly actually what Adam Smith said 250 years ago. And I was sympathetic to that, but I then kept on seeing in the data, well, first of all, I found this theory written in the sixties that said that no country has industrialized even to that first basic level of textiles without adult literacy being about 70 to 80% of the population. Which means basically all adults, all men, plus well over half the female population as well. And this was the theory written in the sixties and when I looked at the data, it was proven right and I couldn't quite understand why - if you just need dextrous fingers to work in a textile mill, why would there be that link? And I ended up talking to a guy who ran Levi's factories in Asia in the 1980s and he said, “Charlie, just think about it.”You've got this box of Levi's jeans coming down the conveyor belt. Do you put that box onto the truck labelled United States or that truck labelled Europe for export? And if you can't read and write, you won't even get that right. So the adult literacy thing I think is overlooked. People are focusing on secondary school, high school education, how much [many] university graduates a country needs and they do need graduates too. But until you get to that 70 to 80% adult literacy, textile mills don't go to a country. And we can see that they did go to China in the nineties when they got to adult literacy of 70%. They are in Southeast Asia. They're in Bangladesh since education hit about 70 to 80% in the last 10 to 15 years. But they're not big in sub-Saharan Africa, or at least in parts of Nigeria or the Sahel or West Africa because the education levels still aren't there yet. So, you know, I looked as far back as I could go to the 19th century and even the first non-European country to take off, Japan, had an adult literacy rate of about 70% by 1900 and 20 years later, they had a thriving textile industry. The education always comes first. And Korea copied that Japan model in the 1950s and sixties, Taiwan, Hong Kong, all the rest [of] Southeast Asia's followed. Now, South Asia's doing it and luckily it's spreading across Africa too. But the adult literacy is the first essential step.Tobi;One possible objection. And I haven't seen this anywhere, but I couldn't really get it out of my mind while I was reading that part of the book is that some will argue that increasing education also increases domestic wages and that is really a problem for industrializing. And, if I recall, one particular point that the anonymous economic historian on Twitter, Pseudoerasmus, made particularly about Asia, is they were able to combine a very high adult literacy rate - a measure which you use is completion of secondary education…Charlie;Yeah.Tobi;With very unusually low domestic wages. What role do wages play in your analysis?Charlie;I think that's the norm actually. It connects to the fertility thing. And I'm not sure if you want to jump there just yet, but what tends to happen when you've educated your population is that the fertility rate drops a lot. And when that happens, the number of people who have to stay at home looking after 5, 6, 7 children goes down a lot too. Women can go into the workforce and of course cause you've got the education, right? Those women are educated so they can join the industrial workforce as well. So very roughly, if we say there's a hundred people in Nigeria, 50 kids and 50 adults, let's say 25 of the adults have to be staying at home to look after 50 kids, you're talking 25% of the population can go out and work of the overall population. You go to Asia today and it's more like 70% adults, say 30% of kids.So you need maybe 15% of adults to stay at home. And you end up with something like 85% of the whole population can go out to work instead of 25%. Now, the consequence of that is a massive rise in the working-age population. And I think that that keeps industrial wages low for a few generations, in fact. Or at least three decades. Probably 40 years, where the education's come through, the fertility rates come down, you've got this huge excess supply of labour, which is then joining the industrial workforce and getting jobs. But because there keeps on being more people joining that workforce, it keeps wages relatively low. Now, what eventually happens then after a few decades is that that big increase in the workforce stops increasing as fast. We've seen this in China in the last 20 years. So, 20 years ago China's per capita GDP was about fifteen hundred dollars, $1,500.Whereas now, now the population has stopped growing. Working age population's shrinking. It's gone up to over $11,500. It's gone up tenfold. So the big reward for industrialization comes later. And we had this in Europe of course in the 19th century, you know, wages were pretty awful and industrial working was pretty awful experience in the 19th century. I mean it paid slightly better than rural subsistence farming, which is why people came to the cities. But London was a horrible place for the vast majority of people. And the industrial workhouses were terrible places as well. And that lasted for generations. It's only when that big population, kind of, boom stories started to shift that labour eventually got any bargaining power. Cause when there was too much labour coming into the market, they had no bargaining power with the factory owners. It wasn't until the 1870s that the trade unions became legal in, say, the United States. Because up till then, you know, "you join a union, I fire you," you know, could be what the factory owner would say in the United States, cause there's always gonna be another person I can employ. But once the workforce starts to gain a bit of bargaining power, cause it's not expanding quite so fast, then finally wages start to pick up. So I think what's happened in Asia is pretty normal and will probably be the experience that we've seen across Africa as well.Tobi;Inevitably this will take us into what it means to be educated, really. Because a lot of countries, I mean it's pretty much standard - they say, Oh yeah, we want invest in education. Um, we know it is important for human capital. We know how important it is to have an educated population and all that. You talked about some data challenges also for some countries in your book. So what I wanna ask here is what exactly does it mean to be educated in the sense that you are talking about in the book?Charlie;Yeah, this is a really fair question. Why am I talking about adult literacy? The definition is can you read and write four sentences in any language? Sentences like "farming is hard work." So it's not a very high threshold and I wouldn't argue, I don't think you would, that it's highly educated. It's just educated enough to put that box of jeans onto the right truck when it's going to America or Europe. But all that's doing then is taking your country's per capita GDP from your per person kind of wealth from say $500 a year, a thousand dollars a year to the kind of two, $3,000 a year level. It doesn't mean you've got the education levels you need to get to the $10,000 per capita GDP level growth or 20 or 50 or even a hundred. Um, to get to the 10,000 level, I think you probably need very good secondary school education as well.And to get to the $20,000 per capital GDP level, you're talking a lot of graduates coming out of university and you need to have that education then spreading throughout the population, both broadening and deeper education as well. And that is a process that takes decades. I mean I focused quite a bit on Korea because it was one of the most successful models and then China came along and did it even faster. But what Korea prioritized in the 1950s was getting that adult literacy rate from 35% or so, too low even to grow sustainably, to about 90% they said by 1960. So in about 10 or 15 years they got it from 35 to 90 and that was enough then to have textile mills do really well in the 1960s and they became a manufacturing country, an industrialized country by the early 1970s.But already then the government said, right, we need more engineers, we need graduates coming out of university to do heavy industry, to do cars, shipbuilding. But Korea had no cars or shipbuilding at the time, nothing significant. So they were changing the university focus from, kind of, the arts or law towards engineering and the sciences before they had the economic sectors that they were trying to promote. And then about 10 to 20 years later, all these graduates were then in the economy and ready to start up companies like Deawoo, Hyundai, Kia, Samsung. And they started small obviously in the 1980s and early nineties. But this kind of sequential thinking about it meant that Korea kept on having the right human capital at every stage of development. So my book's trying to focus on, you know, why hasn't Pakistan got all the textile factories?Why does Bangladesh have them? Why doesn't Nigeria have them? Why does Vietnam have them? And this is saying first you've gotta get that sequencing right of everybody ideally being literate, everybody having had school up to 11 years old and come out with a good standard of education. On the quality issue you just raised, the problem here is a couple of things. So I mean firstly people sometimes just make up the data and say, yes, my population is literate when it's not. But secondly, when you try and kind of shoehorn a hundred kids into one class to say, you know, they're all going to school now, but you've only got one teacher, you are not coming out with a good education at all. You might not even be coming out literate at all. So that, you know, I'm also trying to warn that governments can't do this on the cheap. Or not completely. They have to take it seriously and say, look, we actually need to make sure everyone really is coming out able to read and write. It's not just trying to tick a box to say everyone's at school.Tobi;Hopefully, we'll circle back to policy questions around this later. Let's talk briefly about electricity, which as you say, once you start investigating these factors, then you start teasing out what's what for each country. And the way you introduce that is [that] there are some countries with very high adult literacy rates but still weren't getting the benefits - like [the] Philippines, which was your example in the book. And it turns out what was missing in that particular case was electricity generation. But first I want you to make one distinction for me quite quickly. Cause it's funny, I was reading David Pilling's brief coverage of your book in the FT and he talked about the fertility part being controversial and I wonder that people miss the obvious controversy in electricity, but we'll get to that. So, now, is it really about investment in electricity that is often missing in countries that can't quite manage to get it right or the way their electricity market is structured? I know you are quite familiar with Nigeria and it's really a big, big, big debate that we've been having for, I don't know, like 20 years. So, some people will say you need very large upfront investment, possibly by the government, in generating capacity transmission, machinery and co. We argue, oh no, you really need to restructure the electricity market first. People have to pay for what they use. You need to restructure the tariff system, blah blah blah, blah, blah. What are your thoughts?Charlie;Um, big issues. And there is a debate. There're so many debates about this actually. There's the debate about whether you need a big national grid, big national generation and distribution companies or whether you can have localized electricity. Um, you are getting a couple of points though that I think it's easier to say some answers to. And one of them was to do with getting people to actually pay their bills. Certainly a problem in Nigeria, apparently, you know, discos will say that because there hasn't been good metering and despite privatization that those meters have not been rolled out. I know the government's promising to roll it out to all 10 million account holders now, but because there hasn't been metering, you can't charge necessarily the fair price for the amount of electricity people have used. So then people don't wanna pay. So then the discos are losing money, then they can't pay the generators and this then becomes a problem.And I think there is a case to say that if the generators can sell some power directly to some big companies, that could be one way around part of the problem. So in a place like Lagos, very similar to the Philippines in the 20th century, good educated population just held back by a lack of cheap reliable power. You know, I think if Lagos could have its own electricity story, it would be a phenomenally successful economy. It should be over the next three or four decades. So there is a case about how you structure this. But I found two or three things interesting when I was looking into this issue in 2018. And the first was just clarifying that it really is electricity that people need more than say transport infrastructure. You know, this is a survey the world bank had done and the only countries where they've said transport infrastructure was the bigger problem was countries where there wasn't an electricity problem because there's so much of it.So countries, where there's a load of electricity, say yes we need more transport infrastructure, but everybody else says we have to have the electricity first. So then it's a question of how do you roll that out in a way that makes money and supports development? And there is a... I think, a problem at the moment with well-meaning policies from people like the United Nations or the African Development Bank saying everybody should have access to electricity. But my point in the book is, and Adam Smith said the same thing in the 18th century, you want your infrastructure to be making money not losing money. You need to make sure that if you're going to supply people with a road or a bridge or electricity, that they can pay for it. And if you start building stuff that loses you money because people can't pay their bills, then you'll end up with an uneconomic electricity system which can't function properly and can't give industry what it needs.And what I try to emphasize in this is that every country from America and France in the 1920s to Turkey in the 1960s or seventies to Korea in the 1970s, every country has said, okay, let's make sure we've got electricity for industry first. Profitable, makes money, and then households over time? Yeah, okay, we'll connect them over time, but only when they can start affording to pay for electricity. It's not another subsidy that governments can't afford, we just can't do that. [This] is what every other country's done. But at the moment I do see this pressure for electricity systems to try and roll out universal access and so, in places like Kenya that's putting the whole electricity system under financial pressure because it's hurting their profits. And if you're trying to roll out cheap electricity to households, well how do you pay for that?Well, government subsidies partly, but the other way to pay for it is to make industry pay a high price. But if you're making industry pay a high price industry won't come. They'll go to Asia; where they get a low price for electricity. They're not going to go to somewhere that's got a high price. Cause no company's gonna say, I just wanna subsidize households getting electricity. Companies are coming to build stuff in countries because they'll make a good profit from doing so. So I think you've raised a number of issues there, you know, is localized electricity good, and so on? You know, what should you be prioritizing first - industry or households? And there's a whole host of issues. But I hope I've answered that.Tobi;Actually, that's the controversy I was referring to at the beginning of that question because the background that is, it'll be a very, very tough sell in the current political climate, for example in Nigeria, for any person aspiring to public office to make this argument that you have to power industry first. What it's going to sound like is: you are just trying to prioritize the rich and trying to exclude some people from what, like you said, has come to be framed as a universal basic right. You talk to a lot of small businesses, even individuals, like you mentioned with the World Bank Survey, the importance of electricity is so paramount on everybody's mind that if there's stable electricity, I can start X and Y businesses. I could make money and, I mean, no one needs the government for anything else. Just give us electricity.Charlie;Yeah.Tobi;So my point is practically… thinking about this practically, how do you think a sensible government that is not trying to bankrupt itself prematurely can manage this situation?Charlie;Well, I think it's hard work. Um, how did the Koreans do it in the sixties or the seventies or the eighties? They gave you no right to protest - military government. How did the communists do so well at getting this industry first, households later? How did they get it right in China or Russia? Same thing. You've got no rights to protest. "Your interests don't matter, we're thinking 10 to 20 years ahead how to make our country better off and how to make everyone better off. So you suffer now because we are gonna prioritize business." So that is one model. I'm not recommending it, I'm just saying it is a model that can be done. The other way is to allow it to be done by the private sector. And if you let the private sector roll out electricity, they will not supply electricity to people who won't pay their bills.And that is the story that you saw in western Europe, it's the story you saw in the States, and to some extent you're seeing actually in Kenya. There's quite an interesting company there called M-KOPA. And M-KOPA will sell you, well, they'll lend you, they'll lease you, a solar panel, a little one that you can put on your - actually, a friend of mine was showing it to me the other day in Uganda...they put it on the straw roof of the mud hut and that solar panel, you pay a monthly fee and after about 18 months you've paid for the panel, you've also got energy during that time enough to supply a mobile phone and so on, lights a little bit, and then it's yours and that's effectively privatizing that rural distribution story. But I think the difficulty is that politicians find it really hard to do this.And part of what I'm writing about in the book is how really hard it is for governments in a country with no savings, big population growth, to constantly meet all of the different demands. With huge population growth you're having to build new schools all the time, you have to hire even more teachers all the time. You've got population pressure, maybe, causing clashes over agricultural land like the Fulani herdsman in Central Nigeria, Northern Nigeria as well. And all of these pressures are on you all of the time. And there's constant demand to spend more on bridges, on hospitals, on education, on security. And what you can't afford to be doing is making a loss. And so I think what politicians need to do is say, we've gotta sequence this right. The same thing as with education. It's no good having a million university graduates if a country isn't literate enough to have an industrial base, you've gotta have the literacy first.And equally, it's no good having electricity rolled out to every household when there are no factories for people to go and get the jobs they need to be able to pay the electricity bill. And it's not easy. I, I totally understand it's not an easy situation for anyone to be in. The difficulty is [that] because it's not easy, too many political leaders will take what appears to be the easy option of saying, "I tell you what, let's just go and borrow a load of dollars offshore. Nigeria's going to go and issue a lot of dollar debt and we'll use that to try and sort these problems out." Kenya's done the same, Ghana's done the same, Pakistan's done the same. And the risk then is that you end up in default situations. So that feeds into one of the other chapters in the book as well.But I think it's very difficult. I think realistically governments need to say, what can we do here? And this is how long it's going to take. And it's going to be not a five-year story, it's going be a 20-year story, a 30-year story to get it right. And people, sadly, need to be patient, which is hard; when for generations people have been waiting for things to get much, much better and little progress has been made, relatively little progress has been made compared to Asia and that causes a lot of political frustration. I think.Tobi;I mean, speaking about Asia and I mean your point about taking away the right to protest, I think Africa and Nigeria sort of missed that window when we had military governments everywhere. So, uh, let me give you one experience I've had in trying to discuss your book with friends. So I get two reactions to the fertility section.It's almost automatic, you know, when you discuss fertility being at a certain level and I try to, you know, successfully argue your point, you get two strands of reactions in my experience, one goes immediately to the China issue - the one-child policy; that, "oh, so are you trying to say we should do what China did?" The other slightly more technical objection I get goes to the relationship between population growth and economic growth that is quite pervasive in the growth literature. Did you also experience that while writing the book and debating with colleagues?Charlie;Now I'll take each point in turn. Um, the China one-child policy story helps explain this massive rise in Chinese savings and then their very strong growth. What I'm trying to show in the book, of course, is that every rich country has seen a fertility decline. And what I'm arguing is probably the right sort of level for countries to aim for is about two to three kids on average. I don't care if people have five kids or one kid, it's just as a country the average of two to three kids is consistent with a very high, well, a big jump in the level of sayings. And with those savings, you can then industrialize and grow, and grow fast. Um, China I think actually made a mistake. I think China got it wrong by going for the one-child policy because they kind of turbocharged that story, that story that every rich country has got, of lower fertility, it took a really long time in Europe. I mean it took a really, really long time in Europe and that's why Europe had the slowest growth of any industrial revolution. It was done faster by the communism [they had] in Russia and they did faster growth and we've done even faster in China. But the consequence of this one-child policy and what the Chinese have discovered is it's bloody hard to get the fertility rate back up again once you've had one kid. I was talking to a Chinese professor on a plane back from Asia once and she was saying all of her friends, they can't get married, they can't stay married. They get married and they can't stay married because they're all used to being a one-child kind of princess or prince in the family who gets everything they want and then they try married life and they discover as you might well know, that you never get everything you want in a marriage, and you have to compromise.And it's certainly created a problem now that China can't get the kids, they can't raise the fertility level and it's not just China that's discovered that once you've got a low fertility rate, too low, I think of one, you have a problem raising it. Again, Italy's had the same problem, Iran, uh, Russia. So I think China did it too fast. And you certainly don't need to do it and loads of other countries show you that just aiming for that two to three kids figure really helps your economy and gets you onto the path to being middle-income and then a rich country. So I don't think you need to do the China one child. No. Um, the second issue, the population growth versus economic growth. What I show, what we did in this was we looked back at every country's growth rate since 1960 and I compared the per capita GDP growth, the per personal growth of an economy, it's the best way to measure how well an economy itself is really doing. And I compared that growth rate against the share of adults to kids that I was talking to you about a little earlier.Tobi;Yeah.Charlie;And where it's 50-50 roughly, between adults and kids, per capita GDP grows at 1% and that was the story of Asia in the sixties and seventies. It's still the story for a good number of countries including Nigeria today. So per capita GDP growth is about 1% when half your population can't work because they're kids. But once you get two-thirds of the population being adults, your average per capita growth in lower-income countries by half of America's wealth level, so not even lower-income, lower or middle-income countries, your per capita growth, and it averages three to 5% a year. So the structure of your population tells you what your per capita GDP growth is. So it's just... I can't see that there's any other way to explain this than you've gotta get that fertility rate down first before you can start to get the high per capita GDP growth. Um, and it's connected to the savings, of course; cause once you've got two kids instead of six, you're saving money in the bank, the bank starts to have more cash to lend out. There's more money for lending for investment. The government can borrow more cheaply so it can build infrastructure, roads and rail, electricity and cheap electricity cause interest rates are low cause the savings are high because most families are able to put some money aside at the end of the week. But that doesn't happen when 50% of the population are kids. They're not earning any money, they're not saving anything and the poor parents are trying to manage to feed five, six kids on average. You know, they've got nothing left at the end of the week to put into a bank.So the bank's got no cash. So interest rates are really high cause there's no money in the bank. Um, so money's really expensive. So the government can't afford to invest in infrastructure and if it does build electricity it has to charge a lot of money cause it's having to pay a lot of interest on the debt it's taken on. So to me, I've yet to find someone demolish the argument and uh, you know, it could happen.Tobi;Yeah.Charlie;But so far it seems you've got to get the fertility rate down first if you want to get fast growth. Now if you don't want to grow at three, four, 5% a year, you could do it really slowly like Europe did and you grow at say, one and a half, two, eventually, you get from European farming in 1800 to factories that are producing not great stuff by 1900, a hundred years later. But when I'm looking at Nigeria today, I don't want Nigeria to be waiting a hundred years to be doing what Europe took a hundred years to do. I also don't think the Chinese model of it taking 30 years, 20, 30 years but then having a population problem of being too old, I don't think that's the right solution either. But there's somewhere in between. At the moment though, Nigeria's on that long growth story, it's not yet ready for the faster growth storyTobi;On the China question, um, thinking about your answer there, is extremely low fertility or what they say "fertility below the replacement rate" a feature of the kind of explosive growth 30, 35, 40-year trajectory that we've seen in Asia. Because if you look at Korea, Korea even have worse demographic numbers than China and there was no draconian population policy, but it's kind of gone through this explosive growth phase that is even faster and bigger than China's.Charlie;Well, it's been going on for longer. So what the Koreans got right was they raised their adult literacy rate to, you know, they said about 90% by 1960. China, despite being communist and communists tend to say they really appreciate education, didn't get to over 70% literacy until 1990, sometime in the early 1990s, which is 25, 35 years later than Korea. Uh, so Korea was already booming in 1970 at a time when China was having the catastrophic mistakes of the cultural revolution and really bad growth and people feared mass famine. Well many, many did die in China in the sixties. So what I would argue is that Korea had a slower fertility decline and the growth rates were not as fast as China's but they've been growing for 50, 60 years already. So Korea's two to three times richer than China is today. But as you say, they're so ageing that they're gonna be the oldest country in the world by 2030.And what's gonna get interesting then, and I can't really answer this in the book cause we haven't seen it yet, but what's interesting about Korea and we're going to have to watch it carefully, is that you are going to end up with, not 70% adults and 30% kids, it'll be less and less working-age adults, maybe 60%, I dunno maybe eventually 50% and it'll be 50% kids and old age pensioners who can't work. And my guess is that Korean growth is going to slow back to about the 1% per capita growth that Nigeria's got at the moment because Korea's going to be too old. You know, and that's not something that I think people should be thinking about or worrying about. [People should be thinking about] Pakistan, East Africa, Southern Africa, West Africa at the moment. It's [Korea is] just not a...you know, that's a problem to worry about in 50, 60 years. But it is going to be interesting to watch what does happen to growth in really old countries. Um, can pensioners actually still do work? You know, maybe they end up retiring at 70 or 75 or 80, I dunno. It's gonna be quite interesting to see.Tobi;So I mean the question then is, uh, for countries that have fertility rates that are higher than what you described in the book.Charlie;Yeah.Tobi;It then becomes how do we get it to the point where domestic savings start going up, interest rate for the domestic investment environment then benefits from that virtuous cycle. You talked about access to uh, reproductive interventions like contraception, also education, which takes us to where we started this conversation from, especially the education of women and girls, generally. I was taking a look at David Le Bris recently where he was talking about equality between siblings and inequality between siblings and how it affects the overall capital formation, whether it's physical capital or human capital in the society. So my question then is, do you see individual sort of personalized household decision-making affecting this more or it is sort of a national policy thing?Charlie;When it's something as important as family, you know, the individual decisions matter a huge amount. And as I said earlier, I've got no issues with anyone doing what they choose to do. But that big family story, I was just talking to a former minister, actually, of a... former finance minister of a country and he's got five kids, he's saying that he's been able to help fund them go to university, but he can't afford to help them buy a house cause he just hasn't got the cash. And I thought that was a really interesting example of even in a wealthier country, you know, it still matters how big that family is. You know, when I looked into this on how do you get the fertility rate down and there's been quite a lot written about it. I don't have a magic or a single answer, but the theories are first: girls if they're staying at school until they're 18, versus girls who leave school at 13. If you leave school at 13, perhaps you have your first kid at 14, maybe a second kid at 17, third kid at 20. But if you stay at school until you're 18, perhaps the first kid's at 20. So already you've reduced the fertility rate by two just by keeping girls at school. And the key figure, but just kind of remind, well tell people is the key figure is at about three to four kids per woman on average, the banking system has got deposits cash in it of about 35% of GDP, at four to five kids, it's around 30, 25 to 30. At five to six kids, which is where Nigeria is, it's about 20% of GDP. Um, so 20, 30, you know, these sort of levels. If you get to two to three kids though, if you get it below three kids, it more than doubles to about 60% of GDP.That's when banks suddenly have loads of cash. When banks have got loads of cash, there's loads of lending, suddenly access to finance isn't a problem anymore. So how do you get it below three kids? So you educate girls, there's an incentive when women are educated for them to work cause they can start to make decent money in a textile factory that you can't do unless you've got that literacy. Um, the government just telling people that low fertility is a good thing is shown to have some success. From Indonesia to India, these kinds of government campaigns suggesting lower fertility rates have made a difference. The third thing, which really surprised me cause it's such a strong correlation, is [to] stop kids [from] dying. And I was pretty upset, actually, to see the numbers where, for Nigeria, you've got a 10% chance, just over a 10% chance of dying before the age of five because you're born in Nigeria. And when I was comparing that to Covid - which the world spent, what, trillions trying to fight - with a fatality rate of about one or 2%, you think of those with more than a 10% chance of dying just before the age of five in Nigeria. Anyway, it's kind of shockingly high, but when you have such a high chance of losing a child, you tend to have more children and the correlation is really quite strong. So, if you can try and address infant, [and] young child mortality rates, which doesn't cost that much, you can see countries with Nigeria's wealth level that have a mortality rate of not over 10%, but five or even 3%. And usually, countries with such a low mortality rate then have a much lower fertility rate as well. So, people tend to have less kids when they are more confident that all their kids are going to survive childhood. So, some investment in basic healthcare for children, education of girls, contraception availability, yes it does help, and government information campaigns. You put those things together and then you get a country like Bangladesh. Bangladesh which had the same population as Nigeria about 15 years ago. But today Nigeria's got tens of millions more. But Bangladesh is growing as fast as India. Bangladesh's per capita GDP is over $2,000. And it keeps on growing at six, seven, 8% every year. Because they have on average two kids per woman, they've got savings, they don't have much foreign debt because they don't need to borrow dollars from abroad to fund their growth, because they've got their own savings, because the fertility rate is low. Muslim Bangladesh: tremendous success story over the last two or three decades.Tobi;You sort of made allowances for countries that can't quite get their savings right up to the levels where they can get the desired domestic savings and really positively affect their investment environment in a big way. And you talked about debt in the book, which would be familiar to anybody that's been in the new cycle about Nigeria currently, which is that government revenue has collapsed. Debt servicing is rapidly approaching a hundred percent of what the government can collect. And it's only a matter of time before we are talking about a debt crisis. But, like you said, a debt crisis is, like, unavoidable if you're trying to grow and you don't have to requisite domestic savings to sort of mitigate that. But this inevitably brings in the question of debt restructuring which, again, some would also argue does not help you grow. So, in terms of just the sheer macroeconomics management of this, how do you go about it?Charlie;It's tough. The book's arguing, obviously, that a whole chunk of this stuff is really long term. You got to get the education right. So, you've got to have enough teachers and that takes, well, at best Korea did it in 15, 20 years. But even if you've got the education, then you've got to get the fertility rate down. And that takes at best 10 years to get it down by about two kids per woman. Nigeria's at 5.3 kids or so at the moment. It needs to be below three to have the local savings. So, we're talking at least 15 years, even if every priority was made today to try and improve education, do all this reproductive education and so on. So, the governments then have the choice of what do you do? I mean, if you're going to wait 15 years, you can grow at 1% a year per person. But you'll find the population is getting pretty cross because you've got all these other countries in the world growing at three, four, 5% per person every year. You know, why is my country growing at one [percent]? So, the politicians then...[it] becomes so attractive to go out and borrow and, you know, every country, not every single one, but the vast majority of debt defaults in the second half of the 20th century were in high fertility countries. The fertility rate I think was around, on average, five - five kids per woman was the average fertility rate in countries that defaulted in the second half of the 20th century. Wherever they were in the world. A lot of them were in Latin America in the debt crisis of 1980s. So firstly, debt crises are really common in high fertility countries because governments say I want to speed up my growth and they borrow when the markets let them.And we've certainly seen that in Africa in the last 10 years too. And then they borrow too much and then they go into default and then they can lose maybe a decade. And that is what happened in Latin America in the 1980s. But the alternative is to only grow at 1% a year. And yeah, you can avoid debt default. I'm not saying every high fertility country defaults. I'm saying almost all the countries that have defaulted are high fertility. So, you can settle for the low growth but if you don't want to settle for the low growth, the debt becomes a very attractive way to try and get faster growth. But it causes a problem. I end up finding roughly two other ways that you can try.Tobi;Okay.Charlie;And grow faster. Is it okay to jump on to those?Tobi;Yeah, go ahead please.Charlie;Yeah. First is to try and bring in as much foreign investment as you can. Cause you haven't got enough local savings, you don't want to take on too much debt cause eventually you'll default. So, you can try and make yourself very attractive for foreign investors. Foreign direct investors. The only problem with that model is that those foreign direct investors do also want their cheap electricity and the good infrastructure that unfortunately high fertility countries haven't got the money to pay for. So, it's difficult to get in a lot of foreign direct investment. Foreign direct investment in China, I was just reading a really good book by David Lubin, who's the chief economist of Citi for Emerging Markets and he did a book called Dance of the Trillions. Highly recommend, it's brilliant on emerging markets. And he says FDI suddenly started in China in the 1990s. Now, I know why. My book is explaining why I think, which is you finally had a literate population, 70% literacy and you also had the low fertility rate. So, you had the high savings, you had the good infrastructure. But the FDI didn't come 10 years before into China. It only really picked up in the 1990s. So, the point of then is, I mean yeah, try and get some [FDI] if you can, but the last option that I can see other than to just, perhaps, try to go full Stalinist, kind of communist, take control of every part of the economy. But even that still education and low fertility really helps... Um, the last option which any country can do is to run a current account surplus, I think. Have a currency level that's so cheap that you are running a trade surplus. A current account surplus, which is obviously trade plus services and remittances and so on.If you've got a surplus on that current account, you are bringing dollars into the economy and those dollars help reduce interest rates. And Nigeria saw that actually in 2005, six, seven and eight when the oil price was booming. Nigeria had that flood of dollars coming into the economy. Interest rates were really low below inflation and investment was relatively cheap and easy to finance. Now it's a problem to manage when it's a commodity-driven boom because commodities then bust. So, all that flood of money that came in suddenly disappeared again, you know, once the oil price collapsed there wasn't that current account surplus anymore. But if you run a cheap currency policy to make sure you always run a current account surplus, then that helps give you that supply of savings that you can then use to start investing. So that seems to me one of the few ways that a low-income country that's got not enough local savings, doesn't want to wait forever until its fertility rate's down [and] low enough to build the domestic savings, this is one way that looks sustainable that can bring in some foreign cash to help support growth.Tobi;But one minor aside on FDI and you can really correct me here if I'm wrong, wouldn't that really be a bit unstable? Because if you have loads of FDI, if other indicators are really working in your favour and at the slightest hint of a crisis, all that money then flows out.Charlie;Yeah. Well, I'll just differentiate between foreign direct investment and foreign portfolio investment. And, again, David Lubin's book is very good on this because the Washington consensus, which is this set of policies that were drawn up by policy makers around 1989, 1990, it said countries should welcome foreign direct investment. Building factories that it's pretty hard to move out of the country, that that should be welcomed. But when the original guys who drew up the Washington Consensus wrote down the kind of 10 principles, they weren't that keen on foreign portfolio investment. This is the hot money that will include a lot of my investors who will come in and buy shares in companies in the Nigerian Stock Exchange and might come in and buy bonds. And I think it's fair to say that that money can leave in times of trouble and doesn't really support...isn't necessarily as supportive [of growth] and that money we count on the capital account because it is foreign capital.What I was talking about on the current account surplus was obviously the trade surplus, the remittances, the services and so on. So, I think it's more debatable. I think a number of countries have restricted foreign portfolio flows into equity market or the bond market. And if they've got other things going for them, like a low fertility rate, they can kind of get away with that. Um, what I'm highlighting is that for some countries they just don't have that choice. And when America was short of capital in the 19th century, it was British capital that went over and built their railways, that bought all the shares in their infrastructure companies. The Brits owned America for much of the 19th century and then the French actually owned most of Russia. Uh, the railways and the ports and some of the industry, the coal mines [were] very significantly owned by French investors, portfolio funds, and portfolio guys are there to make money as well. You know, they're there to make profit and if you're making good profit, five, 10% a year or whatever sitting in Nigerian equity market, people will stay, and it won't leave. They'll be happy to stay there for many, many years as people are and have been doing in India, actually, since India's education fertility and electricity numbers have all come together in the last 10 years in a really good way. Foreign portfolio guys are saying, "Hey, we wanna put our money into the Indian stock market too." And Indian shares are pretty expensive right now because of that. But the money doesn't want to leave. It'll leave when policy mistakes are made but fundamentally doesn't want to leave. However, I don't deny that there is a reasonable argument you can make to say we're going to choose foreign direct investment, we're going to be more restrictive on foreign portfolio investment. Because that can be more volatile. It can leave quicker. And I wouldn't argue with that. Well, I mean we could debate it, but I think it's harder to prove that you must have foreign portfolio investments to thrive. I think the current account surplus is a better policy choice because it's in your control. Foreign portfolio investors and what they do, that's not in your control.Tobi;One question that stayed with me throughout your book, which is a bit silent in the book itself, maybe it's implied, you can tell me, is that it's really difficult to find a country at any particular point where all these three factors align at the same time. Where you have the requisite adult literacy rate, electricity and fertility, they rarely align at the same point in time in the history of any one country. Because your book did not really distinguish between any particular political preference or institutional arrangements, which I like that, but what institutional arrangement favours the consistency for all these factors to sort of come together, uh, in the economic history basically of a country. Because we know that political leaders tend to favour what benefits their ambition at any particular point in time, you know? And a lot of these things are investments that do pay off in the long run, you know? Like we talked about on savings, a lot of political leaders would want to borrow a lot of money and then leave the debt crisis to the next administration.Charlie;Yeah. Yeah. Happens a lot.Tobi;Yeah. You know, and so many other things, whether you are investing in electricity or education or whatever, they don't really want to do the hard work. They want to do the easy stuff and just leave it to the next guy.So, what institutional arrangements have you found in your observation and study of this that favours the patient consistent build-up to the alignment of these three factors?Charlie;I think it's really, um, it's kind of interesting actually because in each chapter I try and say which countries are at the right place for industrialization, education, which countries are at the right place for electricity, and which countries are at the right place for fertility. Perhaps I didn't properly bring that together in one chapter at the end to say, "so, who's the fast growth story?" But right now, the countries that have brought them together are Vietnam, India, Philippines, Indonesia, Bangladesh, and I think those five countries, Morocco actually six, um, those six countries should be the countries that will show the really good growth for the next 30 to 40 years. Um it's going to be great. And I'm then trying to highlight who's closest to joining them on a 10 year view. Um, Pakistan and Egypt both got big debt problems right now, but five to 10 years they could be joining that group as well and Ghana and actually Kenya and I would argue southern Nigeria could be, could be there in the 2030s.Um, so I am trying to say when they come together. The question you are asking, though, about institutions or perhaps leadership and so on, I think is a really important one because I guess this book in lots of ways is an argument against Why Nations Fail, which was a really interesting book; and [it] said it is all about institutions and the right institutions and that's why if you walk a kilometre across the US border into Mexico, things are run so very differently. It's got to be the institutions, that book argues, that makes the difference between a country succeeding or not. And what I'm arguing is that I don't think that's true. I think you appear to have the good institutions when everything else is running well and you appear to have the terrible institutions when you don't have the education or you don't have the electricity or you don't have the low fertility or worst of all, you haven't got any of them.So, a country that hasn't got any of them, like Niger, Chad, Somalia, you know, these are countries in a terrible place. But I'm saying that they can't have good institutions cause there's no money in the economy, there are not enough educated people in the economy. There's just no way that you're going to get a good setup in those countries. And actually, even at the beginning when, at the first 10 years or so, when you've got these things all coming together, you still don't think the institutions are good. You know, you go to India today, people don't think, "wow, this is a brilliantly run civil service. It's so uncorrupt[ed]." Such wonderful institutions everywhere. They don't say that. They don't say that about Philippines' Duterte, the president who's been just recently retired, by people who were worried the institutions found it difficult to control his populism. And yet Philippines boomed under Duterte, and India's boomed under Modi and countries like Korea boomed even with a level of corruption that means in the last 10 years we've seen four presidents go to jail for corruption.Um, so I argue that the better institutions come afterwards and that's why four presidents have gone to jail in Korea because they're now getting the institutions better. And I read a really good book about why democracies die by some American academics about three or four years ago now. I recommend it. And they pointed out that Latin America, across Latin America, they just copied the American institutions. They said, look, what's working in the Americas is North America. It's United States, they've got it right. Let's copy their institutions, we'll put them into my country, be it Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, whoever. And then they discovered that actually if the human capital is not as advanced, people will undermine the institutions. And you arguably saw Trump try it in the United States itself, but the human capital and the rest of the place was good enough to stop him from going too far.This is all debatable stuff, but you know, this is... So, I think the institutions do work when everything else has been working for some time and before then it's very hard to argue that the institutions work or can make a huge difference. I think the fundamental economic reality of are you growing at 1% a year or three to 5% a year per capita? That isn't about the institutions. Having said all of that? I think there's no doubt that you can have, if you're lucky, very lucky, really good leadership. A leader like Lee Kuan Yew in Singapore, who has got vision, understands or is lucky, but he prioritized education and all the rest, who gets it right and takes the country onto a new path. When I think of some of the most obvious successes, a lot of them are small Singapore, Hong Kong, even Taiwan really.And maybe it's just tougher to do it in a country the size of Nigeria with over 200 million people or, or uh, India with over a billion, which is why it took India so long or Brazil. But I remember even the French president, Charles de Gaulle, I think in the sixties or seventies said, "how is it possible to govern a country with 350 types of cheese?".Um, and in India you'd say, "how can you govern a country of over a billion people with that many different dialects, different customs, different local cultures?" Um, and it is hard, but once you get these fundamentals of education, electricity and fertility right, suddenly, it looks like you can govern well. So, I want to think there is a role for good leadership, um, and it can make a difference and it does help. I just think history's telling us over the last 300 years that we can't count on luck and that lucky guy who happens to be the right leader to come in, sometimes woman who can come in, and push reform in the right way. What we can count on is that if you get the education, electricity and fertility numbers right, you will get out of poverty, you will get better off and your kids will have a much, much better future and your grandchildren even more so.So, I think that's probably one area [where] my book differs from many in the last 10, 15 years is saying, "I don't think it is so much about the things that we all like to pay attention to [like] who's going to win the next election and what are their different policies going to be?" And you know, most of the time I'm arguing it doesn't really make as much difference as we'd like to think.Tobi;Now, another point that came in the later chapters in the book, which I found interesting, and which is quite also a bit of a political issue right now, surrounds migration. Uh, a lot of Nigerians are leaving, I mean it's become even a social media trend and meme - "who is...Charlie;The Japa trend.Tobi;Who is leaving next, uh, yeah, yeah, Japa. So, like, who is leaving next, you know? Right. But you argued in the book that as countries grow richer, there will be more migration not less because what you often hear is that the reason why people are living is because the country is so bad and they're looking for a way to make better lives for themselves, which is true anyway. So, and that the way to really stop this migration wave is if you can improve the domestic economy and then suddenly you see a drop, but you are saying no, um, we are actually going to see more migration as countries grow richer. Now, how do you suppose that this can be resolved with the current, should I say, political environment in Europe and to some extent in America that is increasingly seeing migration from poorer countries as a problem, right? Is it a case of as countries grow richer, then the migration demographic just, sort of, changes to more educated people leaving and less tension and political rancour about migration?Charlie;Um, I doubt, I mean, I doubt that these political problems about immigration in Europe and The States are going to disappear. Cause we've seen election results just in the last two, three weeks in Italy with the far right becoming dominant, in Sweden as well. Where they took in a huge amount of, I think, it was Syrian refugees and before that Somalian refugees. Um, and you're trying to integrate people coming from a country with very low adult literacy into, particularly in Somalia's case, into a country like Sweden, which had a hundred percent, nearly a hundred percent adult literacy already by 1900. That's an integration process that takes generations. As America's still struggling 150 years after civil war, still struggling to manage integration. So, I think that political problem is going to carry on, but it is going to get more acute for Europe, um, and eventually United States because Europe is this aging old continent that hasn't got enough people.I was in Germany two weeks ago and there, there was a surprising number of industrialists saying "we must have a much more open border situation." I said, well, you know, that'll be really interesting to see if you do that because the backlash that we're seeing elsewhere says there is a limit to what countries politics seem ready to accept. And, I think, I even think the Brexit vote was about that. It was about the East European migration into the UK, which had the most open approach to east European countries from Poland and Hungary and Czech coming to the UK. Every other country in Europe kept in a border, well, restrictions, but the UK didn't. And I think that backfired on the UK when it had a Brexit vote that said, "oh, we have too many Polish people eating sausage in our supermarkets. And I, I, yeah, I mean really people cared.I don't understand it. I love the variety obviously, but while I don't understand, while I don't feel the same, [some] people do. So, I think that's the political problem. And even educated people who are needed by the economy might find it hard to integrate, say, beyond the bigger urban centres. I was really shocked when I was writing the book and I was looking at what happens when you've got an educated population but a high fertility rate. What happens across history is people leave. Cause there aren't enough jobs at home. Cause the fertility rate's so high, there's thousands, millions of people coming into the workforce. The savings aren't there to help create the jobs. So, they leave and it's the Philippines, you know, in the 20th century, it's Pakistanis now, where a number of people are well educated, not everyone sadly. But 150 years ago, it was Ireland, and it was Norway, and they were sending their excess population to America, and it caused huge controversy.There was, you know, rioting between, kind of, the Italian immigrants and the Irish immigrants in New York. T

Next Wave Leadership Podcast
Rachel Cossar, CEO/Co-Founder at Virtual Sapiens, On: The Choreography of Business, Inhabiting a Milestone Mindset, and What You May Be Communicating Before You Even Speak

Next Wave Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 33:47


Rachel Cossar is the CEO and Co-founder of Virtual Sapiens, a machine learning SaaS platform that helps client-facing professionals develop and amplify their communication skills and presence in a virtual world. As a former professional ballet dancer and gymnast with unparalleled expertise in nonverbal communication and live performance, Rachel has a knack for translating unique skills into relatable business skills and competencies. In response to a need for holistic communication and presence training in the workplace, Rachel founded Choreography For Business, LLC. Her thought leadership has been featured on the TEDx Northeastern stage, Harvard Business Review, and The Boston Globe, to name a few, and she has worked with leaders, including GE, Pfizer, and Accenture. In this episode… One of the key characteristics of a strong leader is the ability to adapt and overcome. This process looks different for everyone, but in the case of Rachel Cossar, it turned into an entirely new career path. Rachel was a professional ballet dancer for the Boston Ballet until an injury kept her from performing. Once realizing there was a world of possibility outside of ballet waiting for her, she discovered that she had a talent for communication, understanding her audience, and engaging in conversation. Especially with the onset of the pandemic, Rachel found there was a real need for people to be able to communicate effectively. The virtual world requires a combination of verbal and nonverbal skills, so using her skills in communication and leadership, she found a new field and went on to start a thriving company. Her experience has led to incredible insights — now, she shares those with others. In this episode of Next Wave Leadership, Dov Pollack invites Rachel Cossar, the CEO and Co-founder of Virtual Sapiens, to talk about her journey and how she successfully started her business. They talk about her background in gymnastics and ballet, how she developed her talent for communication, and how she found a new business niche. Additionally, they touch on the work Virtual Sapiens is doing and how they operate as a sidekick for other companies.

The Healthcare Leadership Experience Radio Show
Think Deeply, Write Clearly: Why Communication Matters with Brian Morgan | E. 58

The Healthcare Leadership Experience Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 44:10


Explore the impact of the written word and what it means for healthcare.    Episode Introduction    In this episode, Lisa Miller, Managing Director at SpendMend, interviewed Brian Morgan to learn more about the principles and mission of Think Deeply, Write Clearly. Topics include the impact of language and communication on business credibility, why comprehension of the written word belongs only to the reader, how better communication could improve healthcare, and why innovation isn't always exclusively about technology.    Show Topics     Why we're good at writing, but terrible at thinking for writing Solving the challenges in the drafting stage Comprehension belongs to the reader alone Communication at discharge is a big challenge for hospitals  Treating patients as more than a transaction Our default position is to protect ourselves The impact of hospital bills        06:24 Why we're good at writing, but terrible at thinking for writing.  Brian explained how the language and communication we use can create a business credibility or cultural problem.    ‘'…..we can run through life where we have provable statements that are not useful statements. And we aren't very good at saying, "Well, wait. What is this problem in its entirety? What are all of the factors that go into that problem? What are all the factors that go into that decision? And then, how do we curate all of that information down to show not what we believe, but why we believe that to be true and a trustworthy decision for you?" And that would be the same in real estate as it would be in a hospital as it is for somebody working on their marketing or anything else. How do we create trustworthy conclusions, where people see the transparent assessment as opposed to hide the transparent assessment because there's a certain amount of data that is not realistically supporting facts….there are cultural ramifications for this. And so I would say as a rule, we have not treated language and writing and communication with nearly the business credibility problem that it creates or the economic problem that it creates, and certainly, the cultural problem that it creates…We're very good at writing, but we're terrible at thinking for writing. So I decided to take that on.''     09:30 Solving the challenges in the drafting stage Brian noted that templates must help people think well, rather than short-cut the critical thinking process.    ‘'…there are a ton of factors that go into that drafting stage that we hardly ever talk about, and many of them are just business process communication things. For instance, what would normally happen is somebody says, "Well, we have a template for that." And so we say, "Well, okay. That's fine. Let's grab the template." And the template is going to say something like "insert site description here." Well, there's a lot of ways you can write a site description. And the client wants it a certain way, and somebody who's been in the business for six months who's drafting this document because they're inexpensive and we think that that's the way to use money and usability well, is to have that person draft the document. And that person drafts it the way they want it. And now the manager and the editor are going to spend a ton of expensive time fixing that and reframing that site description. And so, all of a sudden we're at, "Well, now we have to talk about factors and we have to talk about checking in and we have to talk about are these templates actually helping people think critically about the problem, or are these templates just rote things that we say, 'Well, if you follow this, everything's going to be fine.'" And if you asked any company across this country, they would all say, "Our templates are not helping people think well. We're trying to shortcut critical thinking with our templates and it shows up in the end product, that we have a short-cutted critical thinking process here."     14:11 Comprehension belongs to the reader alone  Brian explained why it is only the reader's comprehension that matters.   ‘'We are writing as if we have to provide the decision-making information. And that is true, except we're missing one big part of it, which I'm now going to mention. The writer never, ever, ever gets to comprehend for the reader. Comprehension is completely the reader's. So we can do this with your podcast guest right now, right? So if I say, "Lisa, picture a coffee cup." You and I are probably going to end up with a very similar image, but I'm not holding a coffee cup and you're not holding a coffee cup. So what I'm doing is triggering an image that we happen to agree upon for you, but your comprehension is yours. I didn't tell you what it looked like. I didn't tell you what it was made of or if it had a handle or didn't. Your comprehension is completely yours. And so when it's a coffee cup, it doesn't matter. Nobody cares. But now, I'm going to say, "Lisa, the most important thing for this particular hospital is that they spend $3.5 million on this initiative." And now somebody says, "Hey, wait a minute. What's that coffee cup made of?" Right? And comprehension is theirs, it's not mine. Now I have an obligation to say not, "This is the right thing for you to do," ….But I can say, "Let me describe for you how I see the coffee cup. Let me describe for you of what I looked at, all the factors that I looked at, and let me transparently assess all of those factors….We have to understand that they own their own comprehension and we have to respect that. And then, we have to say, "I've thought about this problem enough. I'd like to share my thinking on you and this is why I'm suggesting this conclusion." And they say, "Yes, I think that's a coffee cup, too."      (22:01): Communication at discharge is the most challenging aspect for a hospital Lisa commented that the point of discharge in hospitals has the potential to be transformational with better communication.    ‘'I think you would just do an amazing job if someone said, "Okay, Brian. Here are our communication points to our patients. We want you to review them." Often when I have been in the hospital or a family member has been in, sometimes I read things and I'm like, "Oh. This could be just stated better, kinder, or with more detail," right? Because there's room for confusion. There's an interesting aspect to a hospital, where a point of discharge is really the most challenging part. And how they communicate at the point of discharge, even that of itself could be just transformational because that's where people get confused. They're not hearing things. But it's a printout, it's … a template…. So there are all these areas to how we communicate with patients and there are areas of how we communicate with physicians. We wonder why we can't get alignment, administrators with physicians, because we're not communicating well. Sometimes we'll work with physicians or hospitals to communicate, and we don't have those same problems because we are thinking deeply... I'm always thinking about putting myself in their position or just providing information in a way to help them make their own decision, not trying to manipulate it.''     25:50 Treating patients as more than a transaction Brian shared an experience of ineffective communication in healthcare.    ‘'….I'll give you a quick sort of related story for a second. I had an ophthalmology appointment last week, and it was very clear to me that these people who've been my ophthalmologists for a decade had no... If they wanted me to quit being a client, it was very clear from their communication that they would not mind me quitting being a client. But that was very clear. And it was just the way the forms were written. You've got to fill out this form for Covid. You've got to fill out, then if you don't do this, you're going to owe us a hundred dollars and we're going to transfer your... We're going to... All of this stuff. And I've been a client there forever. And of course, inside the doctor's office everything was fine. There's no problem. But man, were those forms really difficult to read…did I feel like, "Man, I don't even know if I want to do business with you guys. I don't feel like a respected client. I feel like a transaction that you're trying to cover all your bases." And she's a great doctor, but….was that a terrible feeling. And so, my sense is that that's probably happening all throughout the hospital. And so, well, why is that happening? Well, it's very difficult for us to understand our own subconscious responses to things and to get a hold on them. And so, let's take my ophthalmology appointment. They were really concerned during Covid that people would cancel and they would be out money and time, and they've got to pay their staff. And I understand that and I don't even mind giving them a credit card. I mind how it was phrased…..But how do I frame this around somebody else's comprehension so that they understand exactly where I'm coming from and why?''     29:52 The default position is protecting ourselves  Brian said our first instinct is always self-protection, which gets in the way of successful communication.    ‘'We are right to protect ourselves. There's no person on earth who should be running through the planet saying, "You can have my life. I don't have any value here. And so, just take advantage of me." … The problem is, without the ability to protect ourselves with nuance and with nuanced understanding and with a well-observed, then it's going to come out fast. And Danny Kahneman's terrific book, Thinking Fast and Slow, is about this. We work a lot with lawyers, right? Because lawyers end up writing contracts (that) deal with these issues. And so, in essence, what we end up saying is, "I'm going to write this as a document that protects myself. And because I need that so much, I don't even care how you read it." And so, I just made you a transaction. I don't want to make you a transaction. I just made you one. And we do this in every aspect of our lives….We have a default to protect ourselves. And then, the question I think becomes, how do we show the transparent need to protect ourselves and understand somebody else's comprehension at the same point? And now we don't have to battle with it. We can come on the same decision space. We can say, "This is how I'm seeing the coffee cup. How are you seeing the coffee cup?" ‘'I'd really like to see the bill in the next couple of minutes if that's all right." And the person says, "I'm really sorry for that. Of course, yes." Let's do that. Okay. And so, we can get on the same page, but it's not going to be our first instinct, because our first instinct is going to be self protection.''     36:15 The impact of hospital bills.   Lisa highlighted hospitals bills as a potential area to improve patient communication.    ‘'If you think about it, it's so impactful, right? Everything from marketing to internal communication to internal influence to communications with patients, to even as they leave the hospital and transition even to post-hospital, patient gets a bill, right? And we are in a time where collections and billing is going to be somewhat problematic because of inflation, because of everything that's going on. And I've often thought, "There's got to be a transformational way to have these bills go out." Now you see hospitals getting a little gentler. But I've thought, "Wow. If somebody only spent time putting together this letter, a series of letters and put, like you said, they protect the hospital, but they're looking at it from the patient perspective, I bet you they would increase their collections."     Connect with Lisa Miller on LinkedIn Connect with Jim Cagliostro on LinkedIn Connect with Brian Morgan on LinkedIn   Check out VIE Healthcare and SpendMend    You'll Also Hear:   Brian's background as Managing Editor of New York City's premier planning and environmental firm for 16 years, the $2 billion cost of writing documents and why the issue arose from thinking, not writing. ‘'The language was not representative of the quality of the thinking and that was very expensive.''   The importance of critical thinking in producing a document. ‘'It's very easy to produce a document inexpensively. It's very difficult to produce a well thought through document without a critical thinking process involved in that.''    Taking inspiration from Yuval Noah Harari's book, Sapiens, and why a piece of writing is not just transferring information, or ‘'hey, there's food on that tree.''    It's not always about the latest technology: understanding how innovation can take communication to a different level.    Why the depth of thinking around a problem and our ability to frame around that depth results in conversational, economic, and business influence power. ‘'My sense is that we miss that culturally, but it's probably the most important thing in terms of actually getting things done and getting them done efficiently.''   What To Do Next:   Subscribe to The Economics of Healthcare and receive a special report on 15 Effective Cost Savings Strategies.        2. There are three ways to work with VIE Healthcare:   Benchmark a vendor contract – either an existing contract or a new agreement. We can support your team with their cost savings initiatives to add resources and expertise. We set a bold cost savings goal and work together to achieve it.  VIE can perform a cost savings opportunity assessment. We dig deep into all of your spend and uncover unique areas of cost savings.           3. If you are interested in learning more, the quickest way to get your questions answered is to speak with Lisa Miller at lmiller@spendmend.com or directly at 732-319-5700

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
In Order To CHANGE YOUR LIFE In 2023, You Need To DO THESE 3 Things First! | Yuval Noah Harari

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 85:38


Go to athleticgreens.com/impact and receive a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase!This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at http://www.betterhelp.com/impacttheory and get on your way to being your best self. Get $500 off Peloton Tread Packages that come with accessories like a heart rate band, workout mat and non-slip dumbbells. Just go to onepeleton.com to get the deal.Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders AND two free pillows for our listeners! Go to http://www.helixsleep.com/impact. Click here to download your FREE guide to 100x YOUR EFFICIENCY IN 10 EASY STEPS: https://bit.ly/3F8qOJLBuild IRONCLAD discipline in this FREE workshop: https://bit.ly/3RUnYuxOn Today's Episode:As someone on the path of major self-growth, these conversations are key in stretching your mind, changing your beliefs, and begging you to question how you want to live your life and exist in a rapidly changing world. Artificial intelligence has become more front and center in the past few weeks with A.I. art and AI generated images becoming virtually inescapable.What can you do to thrive during these massive changes? Yuval Noah Harari is a historian and the bestselling author of the books that include Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. His book for kids, Unstoppable Us, Volume 1: How Humans Took Over the World is a NY Times Best Book of 2022. Yuval is also a professor of History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the co-founder of the social impact company Sapienship.In this episode the conversation gets deep between the need for your mental flexibility, how much narrative is influencing the world we experience, and the best way you can embrace change.“It is much worse psychologically to feel worthless than to feel exploited” -Yuval Noah HarariCheck out his latest book, Unstoppable Us:How Humans Took Over the World: https://www.amazon.com/Unstoppable-Us-Humans-Took-World-ebook/dp/B09S8VC1JBQUOTES:“We have to keep learning and keep changing throughout our lives otherwise we will be left behind.”“Old jobs disappear, but new jobs emerge. The real difficult thing will be the transition.” “Almost all people are liberal. Even the conservatives…”“The ideological differences are small on the ground, but they are very big in people's imagination. People have fantasies about what the other side is planning to do which are completely divorced from reality.”“Fantasies often shape history and cause people to do terrible things.” “Instead of leaders who are trying to heal the national community you see leaders that try to destroy it and get power by kind of leading just one tribe.”“I think the big narrative is the biological narrative that we are all homo sapiens, that we all have the same basic experiences, [...] these are things that are common to all humans.”“A sacred place is a place plus a story about the place, and this is at the bottom of most conflicts in the world.”“On the level of the body, we can relate to every other human being in the world because biologically we are all the same. What creates this huge distance between us is the fantasies that the mind imagines and produces.”Follow Yuval Noah Harari:Website: https://www.ynharari.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/harari_yuvalFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Yuval.Noah.HarariInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/yuval_noah_harari/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@YuvalNoahHarari

The Daily Archetype
#78. The scientific revolution! Part 4 of Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari with Goncas and Josh.

The Daily Archetype

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 123:35


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23692271-sapiens Part 4!The article I wrote, https://medium.com/@isaacjmiller/a-unified-race-theory-anti-extreme-antiracism-51552a8d160eThe clip from AMChttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9vPuld7ya8Thus Spoke Zarathustra ANIMATED | On The Tarantulashttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds4Gv3TEeU0the video call https://youtu.be/E9pR27A_0C8Join the discussion on the FB grouphttps://www.facebook.com/groups/dailyarchetype/Also DailyArchetype on Instagram Music (Three kinds of Sun) by Norma Rockwell and the theme by studio star gazer, with voices by:  Eli Harris, Katrice Beal, Annie Phung and Allison Drew (not in that order). If interested in helping with the production or to become a guest, please send an email to Please contact me on social media rather than Email.Support on Venmo @isaac-Miller-83 Support the show

Freakonomics Radio
528. Yuval Noah Harari Thinks Life is Meaningless and Amazing

Freakonomics Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 51:59 Very Popular


In this special episode of People I (Mostly) Admire, Steve Levitt talks to the best-selling author of Sapiens and Homo Deus about finding the profound in the obvious.

Vlan!
[BEST-OF] Revenir au temps long pour comprendre le monde avec Christian Grataloup

Vlan!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 57:02


Vous le savez pendant, les vacances, je rediffuse des épisodes Best-of, ceux qui ont beaucoup marqué Vlan ou qui m'ont beaucoup marqué moi même et pour cet hiver, j'ai décidé de ressortir des pépites que vous avez écouté seulement si vous écoutez Vlan depuis des années et dans ce cas, vous allez adorer les réécouter. Autrement, ce seront de nouveaux épisodes pour vous! Christian Grataloup est geo historien, ancien professeur à Science Po Paris et auteur de nombreux ouvrages nous amène dans le temps long pour nous permettre de mieux comprendre comment notre monde fonctionne aujourd'hui. Si vous avez lu et aimé Sapiens d'Harari vous devriez adorer cette conversation qui dure plus longtemps que d'habitude mais qui aurait pu durer tellement plus longtemps tant j'ai aimé discuter et échanger avec Christian. Nous revenons ensemble sur l'histoire de Sapiens, la manière dont il s'est étalé sur l'intégralité du globe, sa conquête du monde. Nous revenons aussi sur les différences physiques entre les humains, sur le concept de race, sur les raisons de l'esclavagisme des noirs et sur l'histoire de l'esclavagisme de manière générale. Christian Grataloup nous explique comment les Chinois bien avant les Européens faisaient du commerce avec l'Afrique avec des moyens bien plus conséquent que Christophe Colomb et casse énormément d'idées reçues. Un épisode un peu long mais profondément passionnant. Suggestion d'autres épisodes à écouter : Vlan #79 Démocratie et réseaux sociaux sont-ils compatibles? avec Nicolas Vanderbiest (https://audmns.com/kNxOSnQ) Vlan #80 Quels futurs pour l'école en France? avec Svenia Busson (https://audmns.com/dqXcECr) Vlan #83 Envisager d'autres manières de gouverner avec Primavera de Filippi (https://audmns.com/DaEpdEi) Vlan #86 La déconnexion des élites est responsable de la montée de l'extrémisme avec Michel Maffesoli (https://audmns.com/GGcksHZ) Vlan #91 Avoir un impact quand on ne croit plus aux politiques avec Alberto Alemanno (https://audmns.com/QdByaWO) Vlan #133 Comment faire à nouveau confiance aux politiques? Avec David Djaiz (https://audmns.com/vmeXeCV) #163 De quel leader politique la France a besoin? avec Alice Barbe (https://audmns.com/wNmgvDf) Vlan #91 Avoir un impact quand on ne croit plus aux politiques avec Alberto Alemanno (https://audmns.com/QdByaWO) Vlan #103 Comment passer du rejet des migrants à leur accueil avec Lionel Pourtau (https://audmns.com/QaEGpTn) #152 Comprendre les rouages du complotisme avec Marie Peltier (https://audmns.com/ALTgJnK) Vlan #59 Disrupter le don pour lutter contre les inégalités avec Alexandre Mars (https://audmns.com/ViVRkly) Vlan #76 Mythes et réalités autour des migrants avec Josephine Goube (https://audmns.com/OOXKKZV) Vlan #125 Revaloriser le rôle de l'école en temps de crise avec Judith Grumbach (https://audmns.com/rEhtxmN)

Présages
[Echange d'hiver] Echanges Climatiques - Notre cerveau nous pousse-t-il à détruire la planète ?

Présages

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 51:19


The Next Big Idea
UNSTOPPABLE US: Yuval Noah Harari on Our Past, Present, and Future

The Next Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 85:19


Yuval Noah Harari is a historian and philosopher whose books — "Sapiens," "Homo Deus," "21 Lessons for the 21st Century," and most recently "Unstoppable Us: How Humans Took Over the World" — have sold more than 40 million copies. He joins Rufus for a wide-ranging conversation about storytelling, life in the Stone Age, the future of democracy, and the threat of AI. --- If you enjoy this episode, check out our interviews with David Wengrow, Jennifer Raff, Christopher Ryan, Ray Dalio, and Jane McGonigal. You can listen to them ad-free by downloading The Next Big Idea app.

Left, Right & Centre
'Unstoppable Us': Yuval Noah Harari On His New Book

Left, Right & Centre

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 5:38


Arzamas
Человек до того, как стать sapiens. Лекция из курса «Как жили первобытные люди»

Arzamas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 31:29


Походная жизнь, разделение костей, удобные камешки, появление эстетики: что археологи знают благодаря мусору, оставленному два миллиона лет назад. Лекция из курса Евгения Черленка. Курс целиком слушайте на нашем сайте arzamas.academy и в приложении «Радио Arzamas».

sapiens arzamas
Podcast – ProgRock.com PodCasts
2022 Nominations: Best Albums From France w/ Chuck and Richard

Podcast – ProgRock.com PodCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 35:28


2022 Nominations : BEST ALBUMS FROM FRANCE Artist Track Duration Album Year The Black Noodle Project Black Moment 4:55 When The Stars Align, It Will Be Time… 2022 Esthesis Place Your Bets 7:17 Watching Worlds Collide 2022 Grandval Les jours innocents 5:09 eau – feu 2022 JPL Paradis perdu 5:47 Sapiens, Chapter 3 / 3: […]

BELLUMARTIS PODCAST
SAPIENS ASESINO, la guerra en la Prehistoria *Bienvenido Martínez Navarro

BELLUMARTIS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 137:51


**** VIDEO EN NUESTRO CANAL DE YOUTUBE **** 📺 https://youtu.be/MrEOyxMBjzo 📺 +++++ Hazte con nuestras camisetas en https://www.bhmshop.app +++++ Desde el nacimiento del primer humano la semilla de la violencia va unida a sus genes como se observa en los estudios antropológicos en simios, más concretamente en chimpancés, la lucha interna por el poder o contra otros grupos por el control de los recursos es la causa de esta violencia. Gracias a Bienvenido Mártinez Navarro, autor del #libro "Sapiens asesino y el ocaso de los Neardentales" *** https://amzn.to/3b0jMtm *** , conoceremos como fueron las guerras y luchas entre los primeros humanos. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Si queréis apoyar a Bellumartis Historia Militar e invitarnos a un café o u una cerveza virtual por nuestro trabajo, podéis visitar nuestro PATREON https://www.patreon.com/bellumartis Conviértete en miembro de este canal y apoya nuestro trabajo https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTtIr7Q_mz1QkzbZc0RWUrw/join ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- No olvidéis suscribiros al canal, si aún no lo habéis hecho. Si queréis ayudarnos, dadle a “me gusta” y también dejadnos comentarios. De esta forma ayudaréis a que los programas sean conocidos por más gente. Y compartidnos con vuestros amigos y conocidos. SIGUENOS EN TODAS LAS REDES SOCIALES ¿Queréis contactar con nosotros? Puedes escribirnos a bellumartishistoriamilitar@gmail.com Nuestra página principal es: https://bellumartishistoriamilitar.blogspot.com

Radio Maria France
La bande à Jésus 2022-11-24 Les bobos sapiens

Radio Maria France

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 39:46


Avec Natalie Saracco

Factually! with Adam Conover
How Humans Took Over the World with Yuval Noah Harari

Factually! with Adam Conover

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 92:12


We've got a big one this week: best-selling historian and author of Sapiens and Unstoppable Us Yuval Noah Harari joins Adam to explain how humans took over the world, discuss his fears about A.I., and to respond to some prominent critiques. Pick up his books at http://factuallypod.com/books Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

File Under: Entertainment Podcast
S2 - E20 - "S" 'REMIX' - Skid Row - Sublime - with Mark from The Evil Mark Show

File Under: Entertainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 215:09


Some sweet (& some salty) Sapiens said “some more S”! So Mark is back to REMIX “S”, well, not exactly a remix as we are dealing with 2 completely new artists here, but….. sit down, shut up, & strap in! THE Evil Mark from The Evil Mark Show, the head degenerate on the fastest growing sports show taking the world by storm, which you can hear each Thursday (with ME!), and each Friday, for the NFL show, with our very own Super Producer Jared, from 'Feathers And Friends' and 'Parrot Gaming Productions' who makes EVERY talking point a work analogy. Find out more information at www.evilmark.com where you can sign up for the newsletter which drops every Friday. Also, check out the Twitter feed. Smash those like buttons! Did you miss Extra Life? There's still time to give to the charity on behalf of our buddies Let's Play Deathray. Donations are being accepted through December 31st, so if you have the means, please visit via the link here. Mark's back on a bender again, as is tradition recording FU:E, when we discuss Skid Row and Sublime! You can check out the playlist here, keeping the 6 songs a piece based on the positive feedback received from the “Q” episode. The songs discussed, in order, are: Skid Row – Big Guns Skid Row – I Remember You Skid Row – Monkey Business Skid Row – In A Darkened Room Skid Row – Wasted Time Skid Row – Iron Will Sublime – What I Got - Reprise Sublime – Right Back Sublime – Get Ready Sublime – 40oz. To Freedom Sublime – Scarlet Begonias Sublime – Smoke Two Joints We play a round of "Is It Aerosmith", of course. If you, or a loved one, is, or has been affected by sexual violence, please know that there are good people and organizations in the world that can offer help. RAINN is the nation's largest anti-sexual violence organization. NSVRC (national sexual violence research center) has resources to help victims, and, importantly, tips on prevention and warning signs. If you have the means to donate, please do so. Every little bit helps. If you would like to e-mail the show, you may do so at Fileunderpod@gmail.com. You can follow us on Twitter and vote in our polls, @FileUnderPod. You can hear more of me, (and guest of this show), Mark, at The Evil Mark Show! Follow those links above! Want File Under swag? Of course you do. Go to http://file-under-entertainment-shop.launchcart.store/shop?page=1

StarTalk Radio
Inventing Society with Yuval Noah Harari

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 43:02


How did humans come to create society? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Yuval Noah Harari, historian and author of “Sapiens” & “Unstoppable Us,” discuss our species' ability to cooperate, the role of artificial intelligence, and more.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/inventing-society-with-yuval-noah-harari/Thanks to our Patrons James Wilson, Zachary Webb, Haris Dilberovic, and Sam McGilvery for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Unknown artists Mariano, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Enterprise Software Innovators
The Future of Agriculture and Biotech at Bayer with CIDO Bijoy Sagar

Enterprise Software Innovators

Play Episode Play 57 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 29:59


On the 12th episode of Enterprise Software Innovators, hosts Evan Reiser (Abnormal Security) and Saam Motamedi (Greylock Partners) talk with Bijoy Sagar, Chief Information Technology and Digital Transformation Officer at Bayer. As one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, Bayer positively impacts billions of people through technology innovations across healthcare, agriculture, and biotech. Today, Bijoy shares how Bayer is deploying digital farming practices, his perspective on AI, and the best methodologies for partnering with startups. Quick hits from Bijoy:On Bayer deploying drones to optimize farming practices: “We have drones over 73 million acres where we're collecting data real time on the field. We have satellite data coming in. We actually acquired a company to get the data so you can actually predict how much soil moisture is there in one square meter of the land. And then you can actually use algorithms to predict how much seed you plant there and how much do you water? What kind of resources do you need there so that you can actually grow, get the best outcome for the farmers in the most sustainable way? This may not be the most critical digital topic somebody would think about until you think about the fact that this is the food you're eating every day.”On building mission-driven teams: “​​You have to have everybody be mission driven. We spend a lot of time purposefully looking at ‘how do we build the teams together, how do we actually get them to be mission focused?' I don't start a single presentation without first referencing our mission and purpose, ‘Health for All, Hunger for None.' I always remind them you are here every single day because there is a patient at the end of the journey, there's a farmer at the end of the journey…You cannot go solve problems of tomorrow with the tools of yesterday.”On the technology frontiers of the future: “The best is yet to come. And what do I mean by that? Some of the really complex pharmaceutical problems such as protein folding would require a 1000 qubit computer right now. We are playing with 40 qubit, so it's gonna be amazing but we're not there yet. So I don't want people to sort of feel like yeah, this is the pinnacle of digital; I don't believe that. I think we will look back six years from now and say my God, those were primitive days!On step changes coming to medicine: “With better models with stronger AI, [in the future, we will have] the ability to do protein folding and visualizations. We should be able to treat Parkinson's disease and cure it. I'm happy to predict and we'll see if I'm true or not in 10 years that Parkinson's will be a curable disease, not even necessarily a manageable disease.”On the framework for engaging with startups: “Look for non weaknesses in the way of solving a problem. I always tell people, if band aid and bailing wire is the cheapest, best, most reliable way to solve a problem, that's fine because there is a role for a band aid and bailing wire, otherwise we wouldn't be making those things, right? So I wouldn't look for a startup to invent a problem to solve. As you say, if you only have a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail.”Recent book recommendation: Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari--Like what you hear? Leave us a review and subscribe to the show on Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts.Find more great lessons from tech leaders and enterprise software experts at enterprisesoftware.blog.Enterprise Software Innovators is produced by Josh Meer, Luke Reiser

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
Let Gaia Be: Geoengineering & the Arrogance of Techno-Sapiens

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 132:40


What's up to my abounding altostratus clouds and brawling ball lighting!   Welcome back to the BNP everyone and thank you for joining! We got a fun one for ya this week folks! I spent way too long on the zany audio tidbits so I hope you enjoy. Your veggies this week make up a deliciously juicy dish indeed: geoengineering. Yep, it's a thing and it's happening. Right now. A lot. If you really want to feel that tin upon your head, go ahead and fasten the hat, but really you don't have to. Geoengineering is way out in the open, and it's only due to a relentless (and highly suspicious) propaganda effort that so many people think of it as a "conspiracy." Again: there are conspiracy "theories," and there are conspiracy FACTS. So. Twist up a blunt, roll it in kief, craft some homemade ginger ale, kick your feet up and hold onto yer butt. This week's ep is the best kind of doozy. Also included in this ep is a recent Yak Fest with fan favorite the inimitable Dr. Sylvie Salinger, where we travel to Brussels to hear from Claire Daly, an Irish MP who may in fact be an undercover mythical Irish faerie. She loudly, publicly and Irishly brings the receipts re: U.S. and Western support for dirty wars around the world and it's fantastic. We round out the chat by taking a good hard look at the deeper role, origins and intent of DARPA dandy and apartheid S. Africa emerald heir Elon "I cuck for the DoD" Musk. He wants to turn Twitter into one app to rule them all as part of Great Reset/4th Industrial Revolution shenanigans and he is NOT your ally. Help keep the BNP on the air by becoming a life-saving patron at www.patreon.com/noetics. For as little as $1/month, you receive a dream interpretation and an original haiku, as well as bonus content such as poems and patron-only zany tidbits.Follow the Yak Fest here: https://rokfin.com/BarbarianYakFest.Make a one-time donation at: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/noetics.Thank you for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP! Follow the BNP on IG @barbarian_noeticsUntil next week everyone, Be excellent to one another,and kind and compassionate towards yourself. One Love,little raven KAW KAWWWTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODE Action Jackson - Florida DiscoNeonTropix - Superhighway Project IndigoChill Lab - Stroll By River (Lo Fi Mix)Thee Sacred Souls - Easier Said Than Done (Original Edit: Slowed n slightly verbed)The Altons - Over and Over Original BNP Edit - Ass Hole SunGil Scott Heron - Who'll Pay Reparations (Original Edit - Verbed)Lofi Girl - Afternoon Jazz (Mix)Vangelis - SpiralDeepbase & Ness - EdoAnn Cole - Got My Mojo WorkinThe Weather Channel - Hacking the Planet: Steering Lightning (Video)Dylan Thomas - Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (Spoken Word)Yheti - Think About You Every DayDreamy Vibes - Midnight Showers (Lo Fi Mix)Billy Jones and the Stars - My Baby's Gone (Verbed)LINKS:History of Geoengineering:https://slate.com/technology/2010/09/weather-as-a-weapon-the-troubling-history-of-geoengineering.htmlTen Geoengineering Technologies:https://climateviewer.com/2017/11/07/ten-technologies-to-own-the-weather-today/Support the show

The Ezra Klein Show
Yuval Noah Harari thinks humans are unstoppable

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 62:10 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with Yuval Noah Harari, historian and bestselling author, about how humanity came to be the dominant species on earth, and what our future might hold. Sean and Yuval discuss mankind's imaginative "superpower," the threats to democracy across the globe, the future of artificial intelligence — and plenty more. Yuval's new book Unstoppable Us adapts many of his macro-historical insights from Sapiens for younger readers, and is the first in a planned four-volume series. Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area Guest: Yuval Noah Harari (@harari_yuval), author; professor, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem References:  Unstoppable Us, Volume 1: How Humans Took Over the World by Yuval Noah Harari; illustrated by Ricard Zaplana Ruiz (Bright Matter; 2022) Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari (Harper; 2017) Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari (Harper; 2015) "Nationalism vs. globalism: the new political divide | Yuval Noah Harari" (TED; YouTube)   Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Patrick Boyd Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Les experts
Les Experts : Immobilier, les prix baissent dans les grandes villes - 02/11

Les experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 21:04


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, le constat réalisé par les indices Meilleurs Agents "Les Échos" concernant la baisse des prix du marché immobilier dans les grandes villes et la réduction de la France des écarts de prélèvement obligatoire avec les autres pays de la zone euro, ont été abordés par Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts, présentée par Nicolas Doze sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Les experts
L'intégrale des Experts du mercredi 2 novembre

Les experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 49:40


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, Nicolas Doze a reçu Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Les experts
Les Experts : La nouvelle théorie monétaire moderne est-elle morte ? - 02/11

Les experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:56


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, la théorie monétaire moderne avec l'idée que les Etats pouvaient emprunter à l'infini, que les banques centrales pouvaient acheter le titre des Etats et qu'on pouvait avoir une monétarisation de la dette, a été abordé par Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts, présentée par Nicolas Doze sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Les Experts
Les Experts : Immobilier, les prix baissent dans les grandes villes - 02/11

Les Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 21:04


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, le constat réalisé par les indices Meilleurs Agents "Les Échos" concernant la baisse des prix du marché immobilier dans les grandes villes et la réduction de la France des écarts de prélèvement obligatoire avec les autres pays de la zone euro, ont été abordés par Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts, présentée par Nicolas Doze sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Les Experts
L'intégrale des Experts du mercredi 2 novembre

Les Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 49:40


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, Nicolas Doze a reçu Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Les Experts
Les Experts : La nouvelle théorie monétaire moderne est-elle morte ? - 02/11

Les Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 26:56


Ce mercredi 2 novembre, la théorie monétaire moderne avec l'idée que les Etats pouvaient emprunter à l'infini, que les banques centrales pouvaient acheter le titre des Etats et qu'on pouvait avoir une monétarisation de la dette, a été abordé par Robin Rivaton, président de Stonal et fondateur de Real Estech, Gilbert Cette, professeur d'économie à Neoma Business School, et Olivier Babeau, président de l'institut Sapiens, dans l'émission Les Experts, présentée par Nicolas Doze sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

How To Academy
Yuval Noah Harari Meets Katherine Rundell - Unstoppable Us

How To Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 72:35


Have you ever wondered how we got here? From hunting mammoths, to flying to the moon? Historian Yuval Noah Harari introduced millions of readers to the story of the human species with his global bestseller Sapiens. His new book Unstoppable Us is the first in a new four-book series telling that story to younger readers. Over the summer he joined children's author and essayist Katherine Rundell on stage to tell us more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

unstoppable sapiens yuval noah harari katherine rundell historian yuval noah harari
Choses à Savoir SCIENCES
Avons-nous cohabité avec l'Homme de Néandertal ?

Choses à Savoir SCIENCES

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 2:28


Même si la densité de population était alors très faible, des contacts entre les hommes de Néandertal et les Homo Sapiens, les hommes modernes, ont sans doute eu lieu. Des recherches récentes montrent d'ailleurs que l'ADN de la majorité de la population actuelle comporte une petite partie du patrimoine génétique des Néandertaliens. Ces contacts ont pu dégénérer en affrontements. Mais, comme en témoigne la composition de notre ADN, les Néandertaliens et les Sapiens ont dû aussi se mêler. La probable cohabitation entre ces deux espèces n'a pas eu lieu partout au même moment. Ainsi des contacts ont dû se produire en Sibérie voilà environ 100.000 ans et au Proche-Orient sans doute 40.000 ans plus tard. En Europe, la rencontre est encore plus tardive. En Europe centrale, en effet, les deux peuples ont dû cohabiter voilà environ 40.000 ans. De récentes fouilles, faites en France et dans le nord de l'Espagne, donnent des dates similaires pour cette partie de l'Europe occidentale. Ces recherches ont permis de fixer à environ 42.500 ans l'apparition de l'homme moderne dans cette partie de l'Europe. De son côté, l'homme de Néandertal aurait disparu voilà environ 40.500 ans. Selon les chercheurs, les deux espèces se seraient donc côtoyées durant une période comprise entre 1.400 et 2.900 ans. Il se peut que l'homme de Néandertal ait été victime d'une épidémie, en raison d'une plus grande fragilité, ou des changements climatiques. Il ne semble d'ailleurs pas que le croisement entre les deux espèces ait revêtu un caractère systématique. La présence résiduelle du patrimoine génétique de l'homme de Néandertal dans notre ADN suggère plutôt l'intégration, au sein d'Homo Sapiens, d'individus isolés. Cette cohabitation entre Néandertaliens et Sapiens ne les a sans doute pas empêchés de se sentir différents. C'est surtout la culture matérielle qui leur permet de se différencier. Ainsi, l'industrie moustérienne reste propre à l'homme de Néandertal. Mais elle ne varie guère avec le temps. Cette relative fixité, face à une plus grande capacité d'évolution des Sapiens, contribue peut-être à expliquer la disparition des Néandertaliens. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Doing Gentle with an edge
79. I am the container | with Bella

Doing Gentle with an edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 103:19


Fifth and final conversation of the third season. Wrapping it up by having two group conversations (trying to get seven people to settle on one date with commitments and other engagements as well as time zones to juggle is a bit like trying to herd cat’s. Not the easiest. Hence: two conversations!), but still… a door closes. And another opens? Or ‘!’? (Yes. Another opens!) A Bella-and-me-conversation wouldn’t be a Bella-and-me-conversation unless discernment was part of it. True for this one too. As Bella is in a state of flux, she’s… “… trying to establish positive rituals for myself, that feel like they feed me. Trying to do so neither at my expense, nor at the expense of those around me. Navigating how to do it in a way that it doesn't convey conflict, but rather conveys collaboration, which I find challenging sometimes.” ~ Bella Which, of course, had us off to the races. Habits. Mindful, or mindless? Might we need a mix of both? “Sometimes I need a little bit of mindless habit too. Because everything in my work is about assessing the moment, appreciating what is there, what potential is there, what limitations are there, both mine and the other persons. And it's really an intense being-present kind of thing.” ~ Bella How do habits relate to rituals and traditions? Or ceremonies? Are they filled with life-force? Or does life-force arise because we do them? Are they mine? What do they give me? What do I give them? Why do I do them? And how? “Being the container. Not being contained by others, by conditioning, by should’s and societal norms and whatnot. Not being contained but being a container for myself. A container for what is there, which is another way of asserting freestanding Yes and Noes. When I'm the container, I'm the one who says Yes or No. Based on my discernment right now, what's valid, what's relevant, what's emotionally appropriate? How's my heart right now? What am I containing? How am I doing that thing? How much can I take? What can I harbor today and what can't I harbor today?” ~ Helena As always, a meandering conversation, gentle and soft, and still filled with tankespjärn. What a lovely combination that is! It’s like a delicious meal, one where many opposites are present. Sweetness as well as salt. Smooth textures, and crunchy ones. A bit of heat, tempered by a rich umami taste. The table is set, so I invite you to dig in! Links: Bella (and some more of her music) 77. Conversations that help me be more me | with Luke Aymon Twilight retreat with@wildherbarista and@whentheblackbirdsings_ Yuval Noah Harari, author of Sapiens

We Are Already Free
Brian Sanders of Food Lies - breaking out of the matrix, how to eat to thrive, why everything you were taught about food is wrong, how to know what info to trust, and much more #011

We Are Already Free

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 79:13


If you ever worry about what you should be eating, or how you should be living to be a healthy human, this episode is for you! We begin with the tragic story of how guest Brian Sanders of Food Lies lost both his parents, to alzheimer's and cancer, nine years ago. Even though they were people who followed all the mainstream guidelines. This started him on a journey of discovery about the root causes of modern diseases. This led to the simple solutions related to diet and lifestyle, which he shares in today's episode. Things Brian Shares: What broke the matrix for him two years ago (I'll give you one guess) Why there's a whole half of the world out there who the mainstream doesn't talk about (you're not alone)! How the pillars for being a healthy homo sapien can help you to thrive Why our dietary guidelines are so very wrong The three refined ingredients to avoid Towards the end, How we can feed the world. And heaps more... Join The Community You're invited to https://alreadyfree.me/yes (join the We Are Already Free community) to: meet other listeners from around the world comment directly on episodes and chat with other listeners ask questions find all the show-notes in one easy place support the ongoing production of the podcast Join now for a once-off fee of only $7, at https://alreadyfree.me/yes (https://alreadyfree.me/yes) How to support yourself, the planet, and this podcast: Support the wisdom and sovereignty of indigenous tribes by https://alreadyfree.me/fourvisionsmarket (using this affiliate link to shop at Four Visions Market) (use discount code ALREADYFREE for 10% off your first purchase). https://alreadyfree.me/yes (Access podcast show-notes chat), meet other listeners, and more. https://alreadyfree.me/community (Join as a full member of the We Are Already Free community) to access the morning practice challenge, live events, community chat, future courses, and more... https://alreadyfree.me/waaf-sn-5dmpc (Sign up for the 5 Day Morning Practice Challenge) and win the morning to win the day. https://nathan.africa/MP-discovery (Book a free 1:1 discovery session) with me DONATE: https://alreadyfree.me/gift (give a gift of thanks) Connect & Review The Podcast https://we-are-already-free.captivate.fm/review (Please take a moment to leave a review) https://we-are-already-free.captivate.fm/instagram (Send Nathan a voicenote on Instagram (private or optionally to share on a future episode)) https://we-are-already-free.captivate.fm/telegram (Send Nathan a voicenote on Telegram (private or optionally to share on a future episode)) Links & Things from this Episode: How to find Food Lies and Brian Sanders online Food lies website: https://www.foodlies.org/ (https://www.foodlies.org/) Food Lies Film - documentary trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTO6ETfUPVc (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTO6ETfUPVc) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/food.lies/ (https://www.instagram.com/food.lies/) Youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/FoodLies (https://www.youtube.com/c/FoodLies) Peak Human Podcast: https://www.peak-human.com/ (https://www.peak-human.com/) Brian's business, Sapiens: https://www.sapien.org/ (https://www.sapien.org) Pre-buy and support the Food Lies documentary on Indiegogo: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/food-lies-post#/ (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/food-lies-post#/) More links from the chat: My tweet response mentioned in the episode: https://twitter.com/nathanmaingard/status/1571521826353807367 (https://twitter.com/nathanmaingard/status/1571521826353807367) Shaun ‘the viking' Zimmer's Episode on WAAF: https://alreadyfree.me/008 (https://alreadyfree.me/008) Denise Minger - china study debunked: https://deniseminger.com/the-china-study/ (https://deniseminger.com/the-china-study/) VIDEO: Mary Ruddick - Blue Zone Myths: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXy_Q0GqARg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXy_Q0GqARg) BOOK: Weston A Price - Nutrition

The Vitalize Podcast
Pricing for Value Unlock, Amplifying Human Connection through Video, and the Leap from Professional Ballerina to Tech CEO, with Rachel Cossar of Virtual Sapiens

The Vitalize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 34:14


Justin Gordon (@justingordon212) talks with Rachel Cossar (@rachelonpointe), Co-Founder and CEO of Virtual Sapiens, a machine learning SaaS platform leveraging AI to help client-facing professionals measurably improve their comfort and confidence in order to master communication skills over video. Like a virtual coach, Virtual Sapiens leverages expert knowledge in body language and presence and provides convenient avenues for receiving personalized feedback and coaching. Users can benchmark their video presence and improvement in their own time with their Virtual Presence Assessment. Users can also use their in-call communication coach, the Sidekick, to receive in-call coaching nudges and encouragements to ensure every call is a success. Both solutions come with progress tracking analytics, so you can actually see your progress over time. Virtual Sapiens amplifies human connection, builds human skills, and leverages cutting edge technology to do so at scale over time. Virtual Sapiens is a VITALIZE portfolio company.Rachel Cossar is a leader in the field of nonverbal communication and leadership presence facilitation. As a former nationally ranked athlete and professional ballet dancer, Rachel has a knack for translating unique skills into relatable business competencies. Virtual Sapiens, Rachel's most recent venture, comes as an evolution of her combined work as founder of Choreography for Business, a nonverbal communication consulting firm, as well as a faculty member with Mobius Executive Leadership and as a leadership presence facilitator with Ariel Group. Rachel has worked with leaders from GE, BCG, Pfizer, Accenture, McKinsey, HBS and more.Rachel believes in the power of leveraging unique channels of communication in their own ways. Whether it is in person, on stage, or on video, human connection is the key to organizational impact. At Virtual Sapiens and in all endeavors, Rachel is known to lean in to the future, to uncertainty, and to strengthening human experiences in business and beyond. Rachel's thought leadership has been featured on the TEDx Northeastern stage, Harvard Business Review, The Boston Globe, Psychology Today and more.Website: Virtual SapiensLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/rachel-cossar/Twitter: @rachelonpointeShow Notes: What Virtual Sapiens is Rachel's background as a professional ballet dancer and how it led her to found Virtual Sapiens How Rachel leveraged the pandemic transition to a virtual world to get Virtual Sapiens off the ground The question of bringing on a technical cofounder vs. outsourcing How Rachel connected with her technical co-founder, and deciding to work together Product development from original vision to today How early feedback provided validation and informed product development Their ideal customer and how that profile shifted since inception How Rachel envisions Virtual Sapiens fitting into the Future of Work The decision to go through an accelerator and choosing the Roux Institute chapter of Techstars Virtual Sapiens' business model and pricing strategy Lessons from the first 2 years of running a tech startup The big vision for Virtual Sapiens More about the show:The Vitalize Podcast, a show by Vitalize Venture Capital (a seed-stage venture capital firm and pre-seed 400+ member angel community open to everyone), dives deep into the world of startup investing and the future of work.Hosted by Justin Gordon, the Director of Marketing at Vitalize Venture Capital, The Vitalize Podcast includes two main series. The Angel Investing series features interviews with a variety of angel investors and VCs around the world. The goal? To help develop the next generation of amazing investors. The Future of Work series takes a look at the founders and investors shaping the new world of work, including insights from our team here at Vitalize Venture Capital. More about us:Vitalize Venture Capital was formed in 2017 as a $16M seed-stage venture fund and now includes both a fund as well as an angel investing community investing in the future of work. Vitalize has offices in Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.The Vitalize Team:Gale - https://twitter.com/galeforceVCCaroline - https://twitter.com/carolinecasson_Justin - https://twitter.com/justingordon212Vitalize Angels, our angel investing community open to everyone:https://vitalize.vc/vitalizeangels/

Sapiens Archana
100 | Los 100 Arcanos de Sapiens Archana

Sapiens Archana

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 21:47


Llegaste al Templo del Enigma y formaste parte de la Cofradía Sapiens Archana en un viaje que ha recorrido cien Arcanos. Cien misterios, secretos, enigmas, mitos y realidades. Celebremos juntos este viaje que nos ha llevado a despertar la curiosidad y a abrir de par en par, las puertas de una diferente percepción. Sé bienvenido, siempre, a Sapiens Archana.

Intelligence Squared
Unstoppable Us: How We Can Shape Humanity's Future, with Yuval Noah Harari – Part Two

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 43:00


Sign up for Intelligence Squared Premium here: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/ for ad-free listening, bonus content, early access and much more. See below for details. In the second part of a special double episode, historian and bestselling author of Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari, joins us to discuss his new book for children, Unstoppable Us, Volume 1. In this instalment, Harari discusses what the future of humankind could look like and how the all-powerful influence of technology will be decisive in shaping it. The author also focuses on how, despite being at the mercy of seemingly seismic geopolitical forces, humans can still take charge of their own destiny and also why the Covid-19 pandemic was not the cultural or political reset that many had predicted or hoped. The conversation also explores how Russia's invasion of Ukraine has interrupted the established international order and Harari's belief that telling stories lies at the heart of human learning. Joining Harari in conversation for this episode is our host, the academic and broadcaster, Professor Shahidha Bari. … We are incredibly grateful for your support. To become an Intelligence Squared Premium subscriber, follow the link: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/  Here's a reminder of the benefits you'll receive as a subscriber: Ad-free listening, because we know some of you would prefer to listen without interruption  One early episode per week Two bonus episodes per month A 25% discount on IQ2+, our exciting streaming service, where you can watch and take part in events live at home and enjoy watching past events on demand and without ads  A 15% discount and priority access to live, in-person events in London, so you won't miss out on tickets Our premium monthly newsletter  Intelligence Squared Merch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Intelligence Squared
Unstoppable Us: Rethinking the History of Humanity, with Yuval Noah Harari – Part One

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:14


Sign up for Intelligence Squared Premium here: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/ for ad-free listening, bonus content, early access and much more. See below for details. In the first part of a special double episode, historian and bestselling author of Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari, joins us to discuss his new book for children, Unstoppable Us, Volume 1. He also reflects on the epic scope of his work looking back over thousands of years of human history and the turbulent times humanity finds itself in today. In 2011, Harari wrote A Brief History of Humankind, covering the last 70,000 years of human evolution. Published in English as Sapiens in 2015, it's since been translated into 65 languages, become a New York Times bestseller admired by both Barack Obama and Bill Gates and is widely seen as a publishing phenomenon. Its future-focused follow-up, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, helped further nudge the dial on how we perceive ourselves as a species and it is the book that launched a growing genre of god's-eye-view non-fiction known as Big History. Harari's latest book is on the smaller side and for smaller people but it's still full of big ideas, inviting younger readers to look at the early history of humankind. Joining Harari in conversation for this episode is our host the academic and broadcaster, Professor Shahidha Bari. … We are incredibly grateful for your support. To become an Intelligence Squared Premium subscriber, follow the link: https://iq2premium.supercast.com/  Here's a reminder of the benefits you'll receive as a subscriber: Ad-free listening, because we know some of you would prefer to listen without interruption  One early episode per week Two bonus episodes per month A 25% discount on IQ2+, our exciting streaming service, where you can watch and take part in events live at home and enjoy watching past events on demand and without ads  A 15% discount and priority access to live, in-person events in London, so you won't miss out on tickets Our premium monthly newsletter  Intelligence Squared Merch Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Here We Go with Josh Rosenberg

This episode has some piles. Piles of thoughts about sportsmanship, Sapiens, Michael Pollan, clutter, meds, Covid protocols, healing, dreams, and wildlife. Endless piles to sift through, so just start. Start now and never look back! Leave a nice rating/review on iTunes if y'like and enjoy your week, good folks. Logo art by Brandon Lai Music by Micah Julius Impressive hops by lowering the dunk hoops

Book Insights Podcast
The History of the Human Species | Book Insights on Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari

Book Insights Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 31:32


*Arguably the most influential self-help book of all time, Dale Carnegie's bestseller had an immediate impact on publication in 1936, going through 17 editions in its first year alone, and coining a much-imitated phrase. *Still highly popular today, How to Win Friends and Influence People is a paean to integrity and good humor in the name of healthy capitalism, and a touchstone of American self-improvement. *People continue to flock to Dale Carnegie courses and swear by his simple, yet powerful, advice. *In fact, it's said that the only diploma hanging in Warren Buffett's office is his certificate from Dale Carnegie's training course. Theme 1: What would Lincoln do? - 0:29 Theme 2: The age of influence - 9:26 Theme 3: Lead like Carnegie - 21:32 Like what you hear? Be sure to like & subscribe to support this podcast! Also leave a comment and let us know your thoughts on the episode. You can also get a free weekly email about the Book Insight of the week. Subscribe at memod.com/insights Want quick save-able, share-able bullet points on this book? Check out the Memo: https://memod.com/WorkingOnWellness/how-can-i-be-more-likeable-191 HEAR THE FULL INTERVIEWS MENTIONED IN TODAYS' EPISODE HERE: Harari, Yuval Noah. “Transcript of ‘What Explains the Rise of Humans?".” Ted, Ted, www.ted.com/talks/yuval_noah_harari_what_explains_the_rise_of_humans/transcript?language=en#t-934356. “Yuval Noah Harari: A History of Humankind.” TVO, 31 Aug. 2015, www.tvo.org/video/programs/the-agenda-with-steve-paikin/yuval-noah-harari-a-history-of-humankind. Full Title: Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind Year of Publication: 2015 Book Author: Yuval Noah Harari To purchase the complete edition of this book click here: https://tinyurl.com/5544vssb Book Insight Writer: Niall Kishtainy Editor: Tom Butler-Bowden Producer: Daniel Gonzalez Production Manager: Karin Richey Curator: Tom Butler-Bowden Narrator: Elliot Schiff

The Rising Man Podcast
RMP 222 - Claim Your Primal Purpose with Jason Bluett

The Rising Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:20


“We are evolutionarily hardwired to live in TRIBE & SERVICE” Jason Bluett is the founder of Primal Man Project, a men's organization helping men live life by their natural design. Modernity has given us incredible power yet our species isn't thriving in body, mind, nor spirit. Jason and Jeddy explore WHERE mankind has gotten lost and HOW we can return to our primal purpose. Listen in for details on revolutionizing culture, pursuing our mission relentlessly, and leaving behind loneliness!   Highlights: [03:21] Why being a man requires responsibility to SELF & OTHERS. [06:30] How the book “Sapiens” by Noah Harari sparked Jason's passion for living by our evolutionary roots. [10:29] Why the concept of land ownership changed humanity's trajectory. [16:01] How decentralizing and deconstructing industrial culture will shift the future. [20:59] What opportunity is there to instill new values into future generations? [25:45] Why serving is hardwired into our soul's purpose. [31:51] How our brains and bodies are designed to be community focused. [35:01] Why chasing dopamine hits will lead to depletion. [38:40] How Johann Hari's book “Lost Connections” makes the case that loneliness causes addiction. [43:50] Why a man's mission is usually bigger than family. [49:06] What does the world need most from men at this time?   Connect with Jason Bluett: Facebook || Primal Man Movement  Instagram || @primalmanmovement - See Linktree for info on men's groups - contact and jump on a call!   Rising Man Links: NEW OFFERING - The Brotherhood || The most inclusive, actionable, and helpful container for men on this planet! Instagram || @risingmanmovement DOJO || A 4 day, carefully crafted sequence of rigorous exercises that will challenge the limits of your mental, physical, and emotional fortitude. Men's Circle || Are you ready to join other men JUST LIKE YOU who have found a way to RISE ABOVE life's challenges and create a life of purpose and fulfillment? Join our online FIRE CIRCLE!  Online Course || IGNITE is a 12 week online program designed to ignite your purpose and propel you into freedom. Features weekly calls, online modules, growth assignments, and community support!  Initiation || Compass is a 4 day 4 night Vision Fast in the wilderness, with preparation and incorporation calls in the months before and after.  YouTube || The Rising Man Movement Website || RisingMan.org  

The Dream Bigger Podcast
Max Lugavere, Nutrition Expert & Best-Selling Author: Debunking Nutrition Myths, Why You Shouldn't Be Scared of Red Meat, Brain Foods and More

The Dream Bigger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 51:37


On today's episode, I'm chatting with science journalist and New York Times best-selling author, Max Lugavere. Max Lugavere had always carried a passion for nutrition science and fitness. When his mom developed a rare form of dementia, Max took a deep dive into nutritional studies and its connection to preventing chronic illnesses. Through his learnings, he's become an advocate for health literacy and has since published The New York Times bestseller Genius Foods and The Wall Street Journal bestseller Genius Kitchen. Max shares everything we need to know about food science and how we can prevent chronic illnesses through our diet. We also talk on nutrition myths, veganism, the long-term effects of alcohol, and so much more. To check out Today's hot tip, Pellequr Spa, click HERE. To learn more about The Genius Life, click HERE.  To connect with Max, click HERE. To connect with Siff, click HERE. To learn more about Arrae, click HERE.   To learn more about Icing & Glitter, click HERE.    To get Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari, click HERE.   Head to babeoriginal.com and use code DREAMBIGGER at checkout to save 15% off your order.    Visit Clare at www.clare.com/dreambigger to get started. And receive $5 off your first gallon of paint. That's www.clare.com/dreambigger for $5 off.   Produced by Dear Media

The Dream Bigger Podcast
Max Lugavere, Nutrition Expert & Best-Selling Author: Debunking Nutrition Myths, Why You Shouldn't Be Scared of Red Meat, Brain Foods and More

The Dream Bigger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 51:01


On today's episode, I'm chatting with science journalist and New York Times best-selling author, Max Lugavere. Max Lugavere had always carried a passion for nutrition science and fitness. When his mom developed a rare form of dementia, Max took a deep dive into nutritional studies and its connection to preventing chronic illnesses. Through his learnings, he's become an advocate for health literacy and has since published The New York Times bestseller Genius Foods and The Wall Street Journal bestseller Genius Kitchen. Max shares everything we need to know about food science and how we can prevent chronic illnesses through our diet. We also talk on nutrition myths, veganism, the long-term effects of alcohol, and so much more. To check out Today's hot tip, Pellequr Spa, click HERE. To learn more about The Genius Life, click HERE.  To connect with Max, click HERE. To connect with Siff, click HERE. To learn more about Arrae, click HERE.   To learn more about Icing & Glitter, click HERE.    To get Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari, click HERE.   Head to babeoriginal.com and use code DREAMBIGGER at checkout to save 15% off your order.    Visit Clare at www.clare.com/dreambigger to get started. And receive $5 off your first gallon of paint. That's www.clare.com/dreambigger for $5 off.   Produced by Dear Media

This Is Hell!
The History of Personhood in the Abortion Debate / Brianna Muir

This Is Hell!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 87:57


Brianna Muir wrote the Sapiens article, "An Archaeology of Personhood and Abortion: Opinions about fetal personhood and abortion have fluctuated enormously throughout history and differ in surprising ways between cultures." Brianna is a master's student in biological anthropology at the University of Central Florida. As an emerging bioarchaeologist, she is interested in how integrative approaches can be used to address questions of personhood, identity, and agency in the past. In particular, she investigates how these factors may have shaped and influenced a person's lived experiences. Muir received her B.A. from the Australian National University in 2019 and has undertaken fieldwork and research in the Philippines, Vanuatu, and Australia.

The Daily Zeitgeist
Dr. Oz Black Belt In Yikeskido, Sapiens Is B.S. 08.26.22

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 62:09


In episode 1318, Jack and Miles are joined by comedian, activist and writer Derrick Lemos  to discuss… Dr. Oz Campaign Put Itself To Bed I Guess…, Just when we thought the GOP was down THEY GET BACK IN LINE!!! Popular Sociology – Sapiens And Pinker – Are Bullshit and more! Dr. Oz Campaign Put Itself To Bed I Guess… Oz campaign on John Fetterman: If he had 'ever eaten a vegetable in his life,' he wouldn't have 'had a stroke' Oz Pressed Trump Admin To OK Quack COVID Drug Popular Sociology – Sapiens And Pinker – Are Bullshit The Dangerous Populist Science of Yuval Noah Harari Pinker's List: Exaggerating Prehistoric War Mortality LISTEN: TWO SHRiMPS (feat. Mac DeMarco) by DOMi & JD BeckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zero To Travel Podcast
Surviving On A Desert Island + Transformative Travel w/ Tom Williams from Desert Island Survival

Zero To Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 78:08 Very Popular


Have you ever wondered if you have the skills to survive on a desert island?  On today's show, I am joined by Tom Williams, owner of Desert Island Survival, to get the scoop on exactly what it takes to be self-reliant in a desolate location.   Whether you're a business owner or an avid adventurer you will not want to miss this episode. Tom shares how went from being an international wealth manager to coordinating desert island survival adventures, the top lessons he's learned from running a survival business, how to find the perfect deserted island, why travel is transformative and so much more. What travel experiences have changed your life? I'd love to hear what they are and hope you will share them by sending me an audio message. Don't forget that if you want access to the private Zero To Travel podcast feed, a bonus episode every month (decided on by YOU), exclusive content, direct access to me to answer your questions, and more. Click Here To Try Premium Passport For Only $1 and get: Access To The Zero To Travel Podcast Archives (300+ amazing episodes and growing)  One Bonus Episode Per Month (Decided By YOU) + Exclusive Content You Can't Hear Anywhere Else  Ask Me (Jason) Your Burning Questions, and Get A Personal Answer!  All Episodes Ad-Free (From April 2021 Onward) This episode is also brought to you by Better Help, visit their website today to get 10% off your first month of services. Tune In To Learn: Why a trip to Honduras at 20 years old, transformed the trajectory of Tom's life What makes desert island survival more than just learning the skills How Tom went from being an international wealth manager to teaching survival skills What it's like to win a race walking to the North Pole The non-negotiables of a desert island survival experience How to turn your biggest passion into a successful business Why the experience of survival is important for everybody The biggest elements of a transformative travel experience How to find “the goldilocks zone” for the perfect desert island Tom's absolute favorite travel destinations and experiences Top takeaways and lessons from running a business and being a parent Why it's important to follow your dreams for the journey instead of the destination And so much more Resources: Join Zero To Travel Premium Passport  Better Help - Today's Sponsor Learn more about Desert Island Survival Tom's book recommendations:  Humankind, Sapiens, At Home,  438 Days Want More? 3 years Alone On Foot: An Interview With Sarah Marquis Finding Your Island Paradise: An Interview With Alex Sheshunoff How To Hike The PCT (Pacific Crest Trail)

The BreakPoint Podcast
Can We Hack Humans?

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 5:21 Very Popular


One of the most enigmatic, sensational, and misguided thinkers of the last 10 years is Israeli historian and pop philosopher Yuval Noah Harari. His book Sapiens, published in English in 2015, sold over a million copies as it told the story of mankind's evolution. His 2017 book Homo Deus predicts a transhumanist future, a world where technology fundamentally reshapes what kind of entity human beings are.   “We humans should get used to the idea that we are no longer mysterious souls. We are now hackable animals,” he told attendees at the 2020 World Economic Forum annual meeting. “By hacking organisms, elites may gain the power to reengineer the power of life itself,” he said two years earlier. “This will be not just the greatest revolution in the history of humanity. This will be the greatest revolution in biology since the very beginning of life 4 billion years ago.”   Harari's prophecy doesn't end there:  “Science is replacing evolution by natural selection by evolution via intelligent design,” he continued in 2018. “Not the intelligent design of some God above the clouds, but our intelligent design, and the intelligent design of our clouds: the IBM cloud, the Microsoft cloud … these are the new, driving forces of evolution.”   Conspiracy theorists might be forgiven for having a field day with such statements. After all, Harari's outspoken fans include some of the most powerful people alive: Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, former President Barack Obama, as well as executive chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab. Despite a somewhat critical response from academics, the success of his books is undeniable.   Still, Harari suffers from a fatal inconsistency. While positioning himself as a prophet, interested in solving the worst abuses that could befall our future hackable selves, he cuts the ideological ground out from anything standing in their way. A keen example is his critique of both liberal democracy and the entire concept of the “individual” as outdated political norms.   “Liberalism,” he wrote in the Guardian “is unprepared for a situation when individual freedom is subverted from within, and when the very concepts of ‘individual' and ‘freedom' no longer make much sense.” Yet in nearly the same breath, Harari rushes us towards that exact conclusion: “In order to survive and prosper in the 21st century,” he writes, “we need to leave behind the naive view of humans as free individuals—a view inherited from Christian theology as much as from the modern Enlightenment.”  Though he is right about the origins of classic liberalism, the result is a self-contradictory mess. In effect, Harari is saying we should stop people from being hacked by hacking ourselves first …  and defend universal values by denying that they exist. “I don't know where the answers will come from,” Harari admits, “but they are definitely not coming from a collection of stories written thousands of years ago.”   If those stories are just stories, Harari is correct. But as C.S. Lewis described, some stories ground us in reality. This is, in fact, what Christianity does, and what reductionist materialism makes impossible.   Though new insight on technology may have helped Harari sell interesting books, dreaming of a world stripped of all values is as old as modernism itself. Had someone given him a copy of Lewis' The Abolition of Man, he may have seen his exact premise tackled by an Oxford don nearly 80 years ago.   All of this matters because ideas have consequences. Harari and those like him may be attempting to shape the trajectory of transhumanism towards a utopian future but, as often the case, public intellectuals with good intentions but bad worldviews are often the blindest to the practical implications of their thinking.   “How does liberal democracy function in an era when governments and corporations can hack humans?” Harari asked in the Guardian article.  A better question is: How does liberal democracy function in an era when people rush to assume they are merely pre-determined “hackable animals” instead of moral agents who are responsible for their decisions, living in a society of people created equal and “endowed by their creator with inalienable rights?”   History tells us the answer to that question. It can't. The entire concept of human rights is intimately connected with a Christian anthropology. Gut a society of that worldview, and there's no limit to how far we can fall.   If Harari's predictions somehow do become reality, it will have less to do with technology, and far more to do with ideas: specifically, the nihilistic, reductionist humanity he so ardently promotes. Technology makes imagined futures possible, but ideas shape how and why we use technology. If he's looking for a worldview that's better for empowering techno-tyrants, corporatists, and demagogues, he could do little better than the one he's promoting.   On the other hand, if he's looking to evade the oppression he fears, he should look to One of the old stories he derides. 

The Daily Stoic
They Punish Themselves First | The Obstacle Is The Way

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 13:40 Very Popular


Ryan talks about revenge, and reads The Daily Stoic's entry of the day.Blinkist is the app that gets you fifteen-minute summaries of the best nonfiction books out there. Blinkist lets you get the topline information and the most important points from the most important nonfiction books out there, whether it's Ryan's own The Daily Stoic, Yuval Harari's Sapiens, and more. Go to blinkist.com/stoic, try it free for 7 days, and save 25% off your new subscription, too.MUD WTR is a coffee alternative with 4 adaptogenic mushrooms and ayurvedic herbs with 1/7th the caffeine of a cup of coffee. Go to mudwtr.com/STOIC and use code STOIC to get 15% off your first purchase.✉️ Want Stoic wisdom delivered to your inbox daily? Sign up for the FREE Daily Stoic email at https://dailystoic.com/dailyemail