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Best podcasts about Tyco

Latest podcast episodes about Tyco

Cleared Hot
Episode 198 - Evy Poumpouras

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 154:04


Evy Poumpouras is a former Secret Service Special Agent who worked the protective details for President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, President George W. Bush, William Clinton, and George H. Bush. She worked complex criminal investigations and undercover operations, executed search and arrest warrants, and investigated both violent and financial crimes. Additionally, Evy was an interrogator for the agency's elite polygraph unit and trained by the Department of Defense in the art and science of lie detection, human behavior, and cognitive influence. Evy is a multi-platform journalist and host who frequently appears on NBC, MSNBC, CNN, and ABC. She is the author of the best-selling book Becoming Bulletproof: Protect Yourself, Read People, Influence Situations, Live Fearlessly. https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Bulletproof-Influence-Situations-Fearlessly/dp/1982103752 Outside of her role as a journalist, Evy is a TEDx speaker and international advisor whose expertise is sought worldwide. She has been a keynote speaker for NASDAQ, SOCOM, Yankee Stadium Series, United Technologies, Corcoran Group, Tyco, Skanska, Red Door Spa, amongst many others. She is an Adjunct Professor for The City University of New York where she teaches criminal justice and criminology. Evy holds a Master of Science from Columbia University in Journalism, a Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology from Argosy University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and International Affairs from Hofstra University. She is also a former New York City Police Academy recruit, and a graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Secret Service Academy, and the Department of Defense Polygraph Institute. https://athleticgreens.com/clearedhot https://mtntough.com/clearedhot https://feals.com/clearedhot https://betterhelp.com/clearedhot  

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 12: U.S. 1

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 47:06


Hop into your big rigs and get ready for a wild ride! In this episode, we're going to be talking about U.S. 1, Marvel's licensed series about a long-haul trucker who also happened to be a superhero.----more---- Episode 12 Transcript [00:00:00] Mike: If you're a middle-aged white guy, maybe trying to sit there and write about the troubles that indigenous people from other countries face, maybe don't do that. Just my ten cents. Welcome to Ten Cent Takes, the podcast where we hand-wave plot holes like it's nobody's business, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson and I am joined by my cohost of chaos, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: Well, hello.  Mike: Hello. Jessika: How are you doing?  Mike: Uh, I am doing a lot better now that I am not on jury duty anymore. So. Jessika: Woo.  Mike: I mean, don't get me wrong. It's a [00:01:00] civic duty that we should all be happy to perform, but it's really nice when you don't have to do it. Jessika: I've been on a jury before.  Mike: Was it, a cool case? Jessika: No, it was a disturbing, unsettling case, but it was still a civic case? It was just, Yeah. It was, it was not great. And I couldn't talk about it. So let's just say I, I took out a lot of my angst with a tennis racket against the wall. Not, not the racket itself, but hitting the ball against the wall a lot. Mike: Yeah,  Jessika: But, civic, duty, it is. So I was 19 at the time.  Mike: I think the last time I had to report for jury duty in person I was 25, give or take. Jessika: Mm.  Mike: And then I got dismissed because they asked me if I would believe a teenager's word over a cop, and at the time I was like, hell no. And these days. Jessika: Yeah. Different opinions now.  Mike: Yeah. [00:02:00] Tangent aside, the reason that we're here on this podcast is because we like to look at and talk about comic books in ways that are both fun and informative. We like to look at the weirdest, silliest, strangest, and coolest moments, and examine how they have been woven into pop culture and history in general.  In this episode, we're hitting the open road of the Marvel Universe and looking at U.S. 1, a 1980s maxi-series about a superhero big rig trucker. But before we go down that road, what is one cool thing that you have read or watched lately? Jessika: So, I had a suggestion made to me by Lauren, from Outer Planes in Santa Rosa. Hey Lauren. And she told me about a comic that is set in the same universe as the Alice in Leatherland that I started reading and I've had on my pull list now.  Mike: Yeah, the one that you mentioned a couple episodes ago?  [00:03:00] Jessika: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And so it was also from Black Mask and it's called Destiny, NY.  I'm on issue one, which is a veritable chonker,  it's absolutely awesome. There are two girls kissing in a closet within the first three pages, so you know I'm already in. And it's cool because it's set in a version of New York where magic exists, and follows a school for kids that have been told by one seer or another that they have a destiny or a prophecy to fulfill. And the students have different abilities and visual characteristics, like one has a third eye and she's supposed to like, see the greatest lie out of the truths or something like that. And she's like, but I don't even know what that is.  It's all super vague, like these poor kids. And I've grabbed the first five issues, and I will be tearing through these and no [00:04:00] time. I'm sure, cause it's already super fun.  Mike: Yeah, that sounds fantastic, to be completely honest. There was a book that I read about a year ago called Magic for Liars, which is a boarding school for magic users. And then the sister of, one of the faculty is called in to investigate a death, and it's really cool because she's not a magic user, but her sister who is part of the faculty is so it's, it was cool. I liked it a lot. Jessika: That's neat.  Mike: But yeah, that was a cool book.  Jessika: Nice.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Well, what about you? What you've been reading, watching, listening to?  Mike: All right. So I'm always mildly embarrassed to admit that I'm a Conan fan, mainly because I think so many people just associate them with Arnold Schwarzenegger and those middling to not-good movies that they made with him in the eighties. Um, yeah, but I really fell in love with his Comics back in 2005 or so,  when they were being done by Dark Horse and they were really, really good. They were these wonderfully dark, low fantasy stories that always seem to [00:05:00] balance like action and tragedy and comedy really well. And Marvel got the character back a couple of years ago, so they've been doing really cool work with them lately.  The new Conan series is really fun and feels really true to the original stories, but they've also displaced him through time, and now they've got them hanging out in the mainstream Marvel Universe via this series.  Jessika: Oh, interesting.  Mike: Yeah. And it's in the series called the Savage Avengers.  It's wild. It's written by Gerrry Duggan, who, he wrote, arguably the best Conan story that I've ever read in Conan 2099, which is they took that Spider-Man 2099 universe, and then they slapped him right in the middle of it.  Jessika: Oh.  Mike: It it's great, like the way that it was written was so perfect. And it's one of those books where anybody who sits there and even if they say they're not a Conan fan, I just say, you need to read this. It's wonderful.  But anyway, so Savage Avengers features him going on adventures with characters like Wolverine [00:06:00] Deadpool, the Punisher and Electra. It's so dumb, but it's so much fun. Like, early on in the series,  he gets a Venom- symbiate joined with them, but it's really weak. So it can only form weapons for him.  Jessika: Okay.  Mike: It's just it, it's great. It's an absolute guilty pleasure, and I refuse to apologize for this. So it was unfortunately not available in Marvel Unlimited, which is probably why I hadn't heard about it, but the back issues are all pretty cheap, and I grabbed a ton of them from Brian's comics on my last run, and I've just been having a blast reading them. We probably should do an episode actually, where we talk about the fact that Conan has been in comics for almost 50 years. And  Jessika: Oh.  Mike: He started at Marvel originally, and now he's back at Marvel, but there was a long hiatus. Jessika: Ooh. I want to hear that arc. Absolutely.  Mike:  All right. Moving right along.  So as tempting as it is to just dive right [00:07:00] into U.S. 1 the comic and its strangeness, I don't think we can talk about it without covering some background info first. So, have you ever heard the term trucking culture before? Jessika: I've absolutely heard of trucking culture, but I'm not too familiar with the intricacies.  My uncle drove a truck for years, but I think he's retired at this point.  Mike: Okay. I think it's something that a lot of people aren't really aware of, or they hear about it and then they start making jokes. Like, I got some glimpses of it when one of my photography gigs have me living on a tour bus for a few months. So, we would visit a lot of legit truck stops in the middle of nowhere. And I'm not talking gas stations, I'm talking full rest stops where restaurants served truckers before other patrons,  the bathrooms had shower stalls and all of the stores felt like kind of miniature Walmarts. They were just massive. And they had anything that you could think of you might need on a long road trip. [00:08:00] It's this side that, if you live in an urban environment folks, aren't really going to see or understand, and it's the staggeringly huge thing that most people never even seem to think about. But I mean, trucking is this major part of the United States and its industry  as noted in this factoid from the American trucking associations, if you would be so kind. Jessika: Nearly every good consumed in the U S is put on a truck at some point. As a result, the trucking industry hauled 72.5% of all freight transported in the United States in 2019, equaling to 11.84 billion tons. The trucking industry was a $791.7 billion industry in that same year representing 80.4% of the nation's freight bill.  Mike: Yeah. It's I was actually, I was really surprised actually to see that it was that much. I assumed that trains [00:09:00] and shipping were at least a little bit bigger. Jessika: No, because we don't here's the problem is that because of the auto industry in the United States, we stifled the ability to make all the train tracks necessary, to get the things to all the places we need. And now it's horrendously expensive to go on a train. Yeah. I don't know that people know that about the United States. So for our international listeners: you can't take trains here, it's very expensive.  Mike: Yeah. First of all, there's no real national rail system. And, and second, the rail system that does exist is prohibitively expensive, unless you are a not far distance commuter.  Like I took Amtrak for a couple, for about a year traveling between Sacramento and San Francisco a couple of times a week. And it was great. It was less expensive to do that a couple of times a week than it was to drive down. But [00:10:00] yeah, it's prohibitively expensive for most people.  Jessika: Yeah. And there are some cities in the United States that do have a decent transportation system. Portland has a decent one in New York, obviously that there are other places to Chicago, yeah.  But I mean, for the most part across country, especially because we're such a large country,  and we are of course expected to share things. California has to share everything. Listen to me, I sound so greedy. Mike: I know. Yeah. What does it, we have the, I think it's like it's top five or top 10 economies in the world. Jessika: We're the top sixth economy in the world by ourselves. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, So if we just dumped off everyone else, the rest of the states would be screwed. Actually a few would hold their own, but those middlin' states. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Suffering.  Mike: Well, as big as it is, the trucking industry, as we know it, [00:11:00] isn't even a hundred years old. Uh, yeah, so really, trucks were first used extensively by the military in WWI, and then trucking became prominent in the 1930s because of the increased construction on paved roads. So, it didn't take long after that, before truckers became a part of American pop culture. They started having songs and movies about them. And as noted by Shane Hamilton in his book, Trucking Country: the Road to America's Walmart Economy, there was this mythology that almost lionized truckers.  Jessika: Hmm.  Mike: If you would, uh, do us all the favor of reading out the section that I found that describes it pretty well. Jessika: The image of the respectable trucker circulated outside the world of Hollywood in the 1950s. As truckers became known as the Knights of the Road for helping stranded motorists, and using their blinkers and [00:12:00] headlights as courtesy signals. This image was further reinforced by the standard driver's uniform of the era: trim, neat pants and button shirt, and the chauffeur's cap. The masculine mythologies of trucking moved increasingly into a wider cultural world in the 1950s and 1960s. As the image of the truck driving man was reflected back to truckers by movies and music.  Mike: Yeah. So the 1970s were when trucking hit, it's kind of Zenith point and pop culture. They wound up being presented as kind of this modern version of cowboys, you know, wandering nomads who rebelled against the oppressive rule of law while still operating under their own kind of honor code. There were a ton of movies and songs during this decade that romanticized the trucker life. And a lot of these have since faded into obscurity, but this was the period when we got that song Convoy by CW McCall, which also inspired a movie with a very young shirtless Kris Kristofferson, um, [00:13:00] uh, Smokey in the Bandit came out in 1977 and it was the number three grossing movie of the year behind Star Wars. And there's also a really bad Chuck Norris action Flint called Breaker Breaker. Like it was a moment in pop culture. Jessika: Are you really going to say that a Chuck Norris movie was bad? What if he's right behind you?  Mike: I mean, yeah. Jessika: It's always a threat. Don't don't deny it.  Mike: Man. Remember when we all used to like Chuck Norris and we thought he was cool before we went off the deep end and it turned out he's just the worst. Remember those days? Jessika: Oh no. We have a nefarious character, nefarious character alert.  Mike: Yeah. What a shock.  Jessika: Oh, not on our podcast.  Mike: I know. All right. Well, okay. So the [00:14:00] eighties, this all started to change in the eighties when truckers started being portrayed more villainously, or at least poorly in media, like Thelma and Louise, you've seen Thelma and Louise, right?  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: Yeah. You remember how there's that gross trucker who keeps on harassing them. Jessika: Yes.  Mike: Yeah. And, the eighties, it was starting to decline, but it wasn't quite there yet. The nineties was when it really picked up and we'll discuss that in a little bit,  Jessika: Hmm.  Mike: But at the time that this comic project started, big rig truckers were still on the high side of public opinion. So we've talked in previous episodes about how Marvel wound up undergoing a commercial Renaissance in the early eighties, under the guidance of Jim Shooter. Particularly, you know, with Saturday morning cartoons and all that stuff.  Jessika: Mm.  Mike: One of the major sources of the success came in the form of toy companies, partnering with the publisher for licensed comic adaptations and arguably, the biggest example of this kind of success came from [00:15:00] partnerships with Hasbro when Marvel created the characters and lore for both Transformers in G.I. Joe. So U.S. 1 was a comic that came about from another partnership, but this one was with a different toy company. It was called Tyco Toys and Tyco wanted to do a licensed comic based on their U.S. 1 brand of slot truck toys.  Jessika: Oh, so this was all based on the Tyco truck, even. truck even.  Mike: Yes, it's a little bit different than the standard Tyco truck, and we'll talk about that in a second, but you know, Tyco probably doesn't sound familiar to people that are younger than us these days, but they were a company that originally made model trains for hobbyists. And then they started making slot car toys in the 1960s, which are the cars that you press the trigger and they go around a track and you can build out the track how you want. So, by the eighties, this brand was the one that was dominating that particular section of the market, the slot car toy section. [00:16:00] And at this point, they decided to create some slot truck toys. It was branded U.S. 1 Electric Trucking, and it launched in 1981. And it was based on the earlier racing sets, but it had a couple of unique features. You could drive the trucks in both forward and reverse, and you could also have the trucks pick up and deliver loads of, and this is the quote, action accessories with that direct interaction from the person operating it. And the tagline was “you control the action”. So I've got this commercial that I found on YouTube, because YouTube has everything and it's actually really cute. You want to give it a shot? Jessika: Sure thing. [00:17:00] Oh, this is really exciting. Oh! That's actually a really fun.  Mike: Right. Jessika: No, that's super freaking fun. That is that's super fun.  Mike: Yeah. So Tyco came to Marvel and they said that they were interested in having a comic adaptation done. And, the comic wound up being written by Al Milgrim, who's actually, he's a pretty interesting dude in comic history, he worked as a writer, and editor and inker, and a penciler during his career. And he was particularly known for this long tenure editing Marvel Fanfare, where I think he edited it for like a decade.  Also the real reason that he's an industry legend though, is because Marvel actually fired him after he hid some messaging in a panel background where he was badmouthing Marvel Harris. The then recently departed editor in chief of Marvel. [00:18:00] Jessika: Oh, damn. That's cold.  Mike: Yeah, it was actually really funny and you can look it up, where he basically wrote some messages vertically on the spines of books in the background of a Spider-Man comic. And there's some weird happenstances about how, I think the editor caught them and had the wording removed. And then, through some error, that image got used instead and went to publish and yeah, it's, it's kind of amazing, but he was actually a full-time employee, which was really rare for one of the people who was actually creating the comics. And so it's this, you know, he was, he was actually fired by Marvel. Jessika: Wow. yeah, From what I've read, most of them were freelance, so that's actually super interesting.  Mike: Yeah.  It's an interesting story. And it's one I would love to talk to him about someday, which we'll discuss that later. I legit love that story about how Milgrim got, let go, because it's totally a move that I would pull. [00:19:00] And then the series was originally drawn by this other long-time Marvel artists named Herb Trimp.  he'd made a name for himself with the Incredible Hulk, and also he is known as the first artist to actually draw Wolverine for publication because he drew the, he drew the issue. John Romita came up with the character design in sketch, but he was the one who actually first drew him in a comic, which was cool. Jessika: That's super neat. Mike: Yeah. And so Trimp also, wasn't a stranger to projects like this. He had recently worked on G.I. Joe. He wound up penciling the first two issues, and then Frank Springer came in to finish out the series, and Springer was another reliable artist from Marvel and he had also been involved with G.I. Joe and Transformers. Milgrim actually has an essay at the end of the first issue called In the Driver's Seat, where he talks about the comics. And it starts with how Tyco asks for the common treatment and then goes into his first meeting with Jim Shooter about the projects. And I kind of love this description where he talks about how he wasn't [00:20:00] really sold on the idea originally. Jessika: Frankly, I wasn't sure. Nobody had ever done anything with trucks and comics before. When I voiced the concern to Jim, it was as if I had slapped his face and challenged him to a duel. Exactly! He exploded. Nobody has done it before. Maybe nobody thinks it can be done. There may even be a lot of resistance to the idea, but we can do it and do it well. I got caught up in the challenge, Jim and I did not fight a duel to the death, lucky for him. Instead, we began discussing the idea of a truck driving hero. We talked about the romance of driving a truck, the dedication of those self-sufficient loners who drive the big rigs, we got swept up in the notion, began to solidify the concept of a trucker with a mission, a goal, a quest.  Mike: Yeah, it's kind of charming to hear how enamored he got with the project during that first meeting. [00:21:00]  The essay also mentions that Marvel's animation division, which as we've also covered in that episode about Saturday morning cartoons, was a thing that they had, was working on what sounded like a TV show pitch. And there might be some toys and animated series in the future, but spoiler, that never happened. I'm curious, how would you summarize this comic series? Jessika: A lot happened. So a lot happened. This series was wild from start to finish. It starts with introductions to Ulysses Solomon Archer, or USA, and his brother, Jefferson, or Jeff after their parents who are truck drivers die in an accident, US and Jeff are raised by Wide Load,. Who's a woman, and Poppa, who are the owners of a truck stop named Shortstop. Mike: We need to stop this for a second. You need to, you need to acknowledge them by their full [00:22:00] names. Jessika: I'm sorry. Remind me what Poppa's name is.  Mike: Poppa Wheelie, and it's Wide Load Annie, and Wide Load Annie. Jessika: Okay. Let me re say that. Okay. Excuse me.  Mike: I'm sorry. It's just it's too good. Jessika: No, you're right. I'm not even going to cut any of this. I'm just going to leave it. No, you're right. I couldn't, you know what, honestly, because I couldn't remember what their full names were when I was writing this out. I was like, this is good enough. So, so yeah, they're the owners of a truck stop called Shortstop and US is this All-American blonde haired, white boy, who has it all going for him. He's literally good at everything without trying. And he's encouraged by Wide Load Annie and Poppa Wheelie to get a college education, even though he knows he wants to be a truck driver, just like his folks, and his adoptive parents and his big brother, Jeff, who he idolizes. [00:23:00] And Jeff is your classic, dark haired boy who just can't seem to keep up with US's successes, and also becomes a truck driver obviously, and seemingly mostly as a backup profession, which is kind of interesting how they they're both like encouraging and disparaging of truck drivers inparts. And I'm like, it's kind of strange. There's a give and take. I don't know what it is. I don't know if you felt that too.  Mike: It's the whole thing of, he is not good. Jefferson is billed as being not good at school, but US is. And so they're like, no, you have to go to college, you have to make something of yourself. And Poppa and Wide Load and Jefferson all support him and send him to school. And Jefferson is doing it via job in trucking. Yeah, they talked about how expensive colleges in those days. And I'm like, my dudes, it's 1980. You could literally go to college on a minimum wage job. And it talks about how also, I think he had scholarships and. Jessika: Cause he was good at [00:24:00] everything.  Mike: and he double majored in computer  Jessika: Electronics. Yeah, exactly.  Mike: Electrical engineering, I think. And then, and then. Jessika: Computer sciences. Yeah. Uh, Yeah. it was a whole thing.  Mike: It's a thing. Exactly. Jessika: So during a drive with a young US, Jeff's big rig is run off the road by a devilish figure he calls the high women just prior to driving off a cliff. The truck explodes and Us is gravely injured in such a way that he evidently needs a skull replacement? Mike: You know? Sure.  Jessika: Have you heard of that? Mike: No. Jessika: Usually with a skull replacement, you're going to be a lot worse off than just, like, gonna in a pop awake in a couple minutes after you put something metal back on there,  Mike: Yeah. It's, uh, I believe they worded it as, oh, is this experimental treatment and I'm like, what? Okay.  Jessika: Which already was so [00:25:00] sus.  Mike: Yeah. And they, basically replace his skull with it's, in this comic, it's implied that it's like just the top part of his skull that like, you know, protects the brain. Later comic appearances, it is very strongly hinted that they basically do a brain transplant into, or, that they basically just give him a metal skull of some kind. It's like, there's no bone to be seen, but. Jessika: Like a new head completely? Lord. Goodness gracious. Well, so after that, he vows to find his brother who he's like, I couldn't find him in the crash. It's like, bro, like you kind of couldn't look for him. You had a concussion, like you're not an expert in finding bodies in an explosion. I don't know how he just definitively was like, well I guess everybody else told him that, that he, the body was never found or whatever, [00:26:00] but. Mike: Yeah, that's true. Jessika: Yeah. So he decided he's gonna find his brother as well as the mysterious Highwayman that he yelled about right before. And he quickly finds out that he can pick up CB radio waves from his fancy new skullcap, and somehow has truck becomes self-aware and he can communicate directly with it? And it's making its own decisions. Inexplicably. It's not well explained, once again.  Mike: It's so truck originally, he builds a remote control into like a half dollar, so he can drive it really like, like a precision driver with his remote. But then later on, I think there's, it was like some kind of like a lightning strike or something or electrical overload that then allowed him to directly interface with the truck. And then the truck is also self-aware at times where it's providing narration for an entire issue. And we'll talk about that, too. Jessika: Yeah, that's what I was going to say. [00:27:00] It was the weirdest thing.  I was kinda on board with most of it. And then the truck was having its own inner monologue. And I was like, wait a second, guys.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Oh, goodness gracious. And then there's also a spy planted within the truck stop in the form of a mind-controlled waitress, Mary McGrill, which their names, all their names.  Mike: The alliteration and stuff and puns. It's great. Jessika: Exactly. It's so cheese. I love it. And she uses this wacky mind control whip, and there's drama about the truck stop being foreclosed upon and being sold to make condos. And, and then DUN DUN DUN! Jeff turns out to be the Highwayman! And they are aliens looking for the best person, read trucker, you know, of course on earth to be some kind of space ambassador? Mike: Yeah. It's not well explained.  [00:28:00] I think it had something to do with they wanted people to pilot their star ships,  because they were like accustomed to like long bouts of being on their own and stuff.  Jessika: Yeah, it was, it was a whole thing too. And then apparently all humans look alike to the aliens.  Mike: I thought that was funny as fuck. That was.  Jessika: I thought that was hysterical  Mike: Because the aliens are so weird looking. Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. And so apparently they had been scoping US this whole time, cause he's like the golden child, but then they accidentally swooped Jeff instead, because they made a mistake and Jeff was just like, yeah, I'm going to go with it. So once they figured out their mistake, they felt really bad about wasting all of their time and effort on this, this putz. And so then they of course had to have a race to make sure who was the best one to be the space ambassador, whether it was [00:29:00] going to be US, who dun dun dun the aliens gave him the skullcap!  Mike: Yup.  Jessika: Or his brother who has been working with the alien tech and has, like, a time advantage and a training advantage. So it's of course, US wins. I mean, come on. So of course they just get sent up into space? And he gets to take the whole truck stop with him? And all of the people? Mike: Yup. Jessika: It's the Rapture? Mike: Yeah. And then the greedy bankers who are left behind, who are going to take the property that the truck stopped. I think they, they wind up getting dosed with some kind of radiation. Jessika: Yeah, the, they were going to build condos on the land and then it ended up being radioactive. And so the buyer ended up pulling out. Mike: Yeah, Jessika: Like right there, because that's how that works.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: So yeah.  The end. That's it. Mike: Oh yeah. [00:30:00] And then the other thing is that for the first half of the series,  we are given to believe that the Highwayman is demonic in origin. Like they do a whole thing where,  he's got his own mind-controlled, big rig that runs them off the road or whatever. And, he's surrounded by devils when he's looking down triumphantly on the wreckage and there's, you know, it's the mythology of the open road where they're like, oh, he was this trucker who, apparently, couldn't keep up anymore with the younger truckers and their newer rigs. So we cut a deal with the devil and it was, I actually kind of dug it. It was ridiculous. And over the top, but it was great. And then it turns out it was just, I don't know, some disguise that he put on just the fuck with everybody. Jessika: He did the Scooby Doo unveiling where he pulled a rubber mask off of his face, and I about lost my mind.  Mike: Yeah. Okay. What was your overall impression of the series? Jessika: It was a fucking [00:31:00] wild ride, but it was fun. I liked that it was so random at times. It legitimately kept me guessing the whole way. The topics though, they were not subtle with the overbearing American patriotism and the overt disdain for neo-Nazis, which obviously I'm behind. Mike: I mean, whatever that was fine. Jessika: that was great when they dropped the, the neo-Nazis in Televiv. Mike: Oh God. Well, and the funniest part was they were, so  one of the  antagonists for us is Baron VonBlimp, who pilot, he, he looks like, he looks like kind of this weird aristocrat from like turn of the century, Europe. No, he's I think he even has a monocle. And then towards the end, when he shows up in his blimp, he drops out and he's got a bunch of Nazis with them and, you know, they've got the swastika, armbands and everything, and then it's revealed they're not actually Nazis and he's not even German. He just liked how the uniforms looked. And then the aliens are like, whatever we're [00:32:00] done with this. And they literally hand wave them away into Israel. And I was like, that's, that's just magnificent. Just chef's kiss. Jessika: Oh, yeah, I did actually really like that. So, so what about you? What did you think about this?  Mike: I mean, it's one of those comics where I never expected to enjoy it as much as I did, but there's something so silly and pure about this entire story. It feels like the kind of thing that a five or six year old kid would come up with while playing with their trucks, you know, like monsters and aliens and races against air ships. And then you hand wave away things when you want to change the narrative. And it  somehow kind of works actually. Like, I don't know how, but it kind of does.  I really loved, like I talked about, I love Baron VonBlimp, I thought he was just so weird.  And then I liked how the Shortstop is essentially the Mos Eisley Cantina, but it's got better coffee. [00:33:00] And it seemed like every time that we first visited the place, someone was getting thrown through a window, which was of. Jessika: Absolutely. There was always a fight scene. It reminded me of a saloon, like one of those old-timey saloons with  people getting thrown out double doors and things crashing.  Mike: Yeah. And then we talked about how US' his truck was self-aware, but, but I love the bit where Papa refers to it as a she and the trucks that there and says I'm not ashamed, but I'm secure enough in myself. That it's fine.  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: I was like, that is weirdly topical through a 2021 lens, but this is also really good. And also every cover to this comic, it is a work of art.  Like, like the styles vary, but they're really cool looking and they're just really weird. Yeah, I mean, it was just, it was a blast. Were there any highlights for you, or any lowlights. Jessika: So I have to say my eyes just about rolled out of my [00:34:00] head, where the aliens showed up and needed chicken parts to make their ship work correctly. And the rivalry between the two female characters was pretty contrived. Mike:  I did like how  they were trying to sit there and spin it so you didn't know who was the sleeper agent? I thought that was kind of cool, but yeah, they were, you know, they were fighting over Us and that was dumb, but it's also, you know, it's the 1980s. What are you gonna do? Jessika: Exactly. Had to have some sort of, you know, forced love triangle of some nature. But I have to say I was oddly charmed at the editing notes from Ralph Macchio, all people? Mike: Uh, editor with the same name as the, yeah. Jessika: Oh, okay. All right. Wow. Goodness gracious. Cause I was like giving that guy a lot of credit.   Mike: Nope. Jessika: I did like that though. I did like the little comments, the little editing notes,  it was a little much [00:35:00] sometimes, but I love that he was throwing shade at the writers sometimes, or reminding the reader about the previous events or where you could read about them. And it was interesting how in depth they recapped each issue, but it must've been nice for the readers who weren't starting from issue one.  Mike: Yeah. And especially because it was a maxi series and then it started in mid 1983 and then it ended in late 1984. So, it went from monthly to bi-monthly, and it was not a big name comic in the first place, so it makes sense that they would sit there and provide that background for readers. And I also really appreciated that it was all the same characters over and over again, so that it wasn't doing anything crazy new, but at the same time, each of those issues you could pick up except for the last couple. Pretty easy to understand. Jessika: Yeah. I would say so.  Mike:  I mentioned earlier that  this was another licensed comic that was designed to help promote a toy line, but as [00:36:00] opposed to G.I. Joe and transformers, though, this wasn't nearly as successful. Comichron, which is a site that tracks sales data for comics doesn't have 1983 data in place yet, but the site comic book, historians has this incredible online community. And I actually wound up posting there and asking if anyone had any insight into how the comics sold and Al Milgrim himself wound up chiming in if you would be so kind.  Jessika: I'm sorry, what? That's cool as heck.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Wow.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: Okay. Well, I got a, sorry, I got a little nervous. Oh sure. I think the first issue sold around 160,000 or so, not great for a first issue, but respectable. Marvel only contracted with the toy company to do a dozen issues. I'm sure the sales went downhill from there. Still think the book was some good silly fun though (I may be [00:37:00] biased).  Mike: Yeah, I was really stunned. This, the comic book historian group actually has a lot of amazing industry professionals involved in it. I've seen writers like Mark Wade chime in, the owner of Mile High Comics routinely posts about comic book history as well. They have a podcast and a YouTube series. They did a long series of interviews with Jim Shooter that was really cool, which actually, I think did a lot to kind of redeem his character a bit because a lot of people viewed him as a villain in the comic book and yeah.  Jessika: Oh.  Mike: But yeah, Milgrim was super cool to chime in on that. And I wound up talking to him briefly afterwards and he said, he'd be open to doing an interview with us at some point. So maybe there'll be a  Part two to the U.S. 1 episode.  Jessika: That's exciting.  Mike: Yeah.  The comic series ran for roughly a year and a half and it ended in October of 1984, the U.S. 1 toys were moderately more successful, they lasted until 86. And then after this trucking and pop culture continued to undergo this shift. [00:38:00] And it feels like the nineties, as I said, was when things really started to significantly change. We talked about Thelma and Louise. There was that Kurt Russell trucking movie called Breakdown, where the villains were truckers. And then. I mean, it's kind of still how they're portrayed these days  in media. I really don't think it helps that the FBI released this five-year study back in 2009 that linked long haul trucking to serial killers. Jessika: Oh. Wow.  Mike: Yeah. And it's one of those things where it's not saying all long haul truckers are a majority of long haul, truckers are serial killers, but that there are a number of serial killers who are long haul truckers. And it makes sense because there's a lack of supervision. And also you can pick someone up in one state, killed them in another and then drop them off, dump the body in a third. And also a lot of times the people that they pick up are people that no one really misses. Jessika: Yeah. Yeah.  Mike: On that high note.  [00:39:00] The funny thing is that this isn't where Ulysses S. Archer's story ends. So even though this was a licensed comic book for a company that was eventually acquired by Mattel,  it seems like Marvel still owns the rights to the characters themselves because Ulysses pops up every now and then he's usually like the supporting character but sometimes it's as to this one-off deep cut. So he appeared in a couple of issues of John Burns, Sensational She Hulk in the early nineties, he was supporting the She Hulk for a few issues. There was a brief cameo and the 2010 series new Avengers where he applied to be a babysitter for Luke Cage and Jessica Jones' daughter  Jessika: Oh, geez.  Mike: It was, it was actually pretty funny. He wound up helping out Rocket Raccoon in this backup story of a 2011 series called the Annihilaters, and then he also teamed up with Deadpool around the same time. And that's the issue where you see, it looks like he's actually got a fully replaced skull made out of metal. They, they, they do one of those like cross section cuts where you see [00:40:00] where you see underneath the scan, it looks like he's got just an all-metal skull. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: Yeah. And then after that,  we haven't heard much about him in the Marvel Universe, but weirdly his brother Jefferson has appeared a bit too. So, he was listed as a character in the Dark Reign files, which was a who's who guide to various Marvel villains in 2009. And it actually retcon his story. Basically it claims that the highway man, after staying on earth wound up actually cutting a deal with Satan, in quotes, whoever that is. And then he wound up fighting against ghost writer. And then aside from the issue where Deadpool teamed up with his brother, he winds up fighting against Deadpool again in 2016 or so. Jessika: That's super random.  Mike: Yeah. And now we're in 2021 and it's been a few years since we've seen Ulysses and his friends show up. But I personally think that we're kind of overdue to have them come back like. Jessika: I [00:41:00] want to see Poppa Wheelie in something.  Mike: Right.  I would love to see him show up as a strong support character in one of those like heroes on the run stories where, whatever hero of the book is being pursued by,  the government or something like that. And then he basically winds up providing kind of a mobile base of operations or something like that. And then he helps them keep our heroes one step ahead of the law.  Jessika: Yeah. Like he floats down on the Shortstop, like space station or something. Yeah. That'd be cool as heck.  Mike: Yeah or something,  I mean, there's so many different ways you could go, you could have him come back to earth and he just winds up working as a trucker again, because that's what he really likes. He misses driving through the natural beauty of America, something like that. You know, I think there could be some really fun opportunities.  And I really hope that Marvel brings him back at some point, because he was just this really fun, weird character. And it was strange and it was silly, but it was also very sweet. So that is U.S. 1 in a nutshell, [00:42:00] what are your final thoughts on it? Jessika: I think it was a lot of fun. It was bananagrams, you know, all the way to the top, but  it was fun.  Mike: Yeah.   All right. It is now time for that part of the episode called Brain Wrinkles, which is when we like to discuss things that are Comics related that are just sticking in our head and won't get out. Do you mind if I go first?  Jessika: Oh, please do.  Mike: All right. I was going to talk about the recent news that Marvel's hired someone to direct Blade, but I'm actually way more excited about something else. There's this podcast called Comic Book Couples Counseling, which is this absolutely rad show. It's hosted by married couple, Brad and Lisa Gullickson, and they take relationships between comics characters, and then examine them through the lens of different self-help love gurus.   So they've been super supportive of us so far. Like they've actually retweeted [00:43:00] our stuff and their show is really fun. But, I was recently reading through a whole bunch of nineties Valiant comics that I managed to pick up from the Bat Cave in Santa Rosa when they have this blind box sale. And one of the series contained in these boxes is called the Second Life of Dr. Mirage. And it's one of the series that I collected when I was a kid it's about this married couple named Hwen Fong and Carmen Ruiz, who were his pair of psychologists. Hwen is this kind of like nebbish little guy, and Carmen is this bruiser, like, she's the bad-ass of the pair. There's this early scene where she winds up saving him from zombies because she's a master of Kappa Wera, which is, you know, it makes sense, cause she's from Brazil. And then in the first issue, they run a foul of Valiance resident necromancer named master dark and he kills Hwen, but then Hwen comes back as a ghost, sort of a ghost kind of a thing. Jessika: Hm.  Mike: But I was reading through the series and I was really struck how this was a superhero comic that actually focused on an [00:44:00] adult relationship and relationship issues that come along with the supernatural stuff, like early on Carmen has a pretty heartfelt talk with her undead husband about how difficult it is for her emotionally, because he's still with her, but she can't touch him. Jessika: Oh my god.  Mike: And anyway, so I wound up tweeting about it, cause I thought the couple would make a good topic for Comic Book Couples Counseling, and they wound up picking up all the back issues like that day. And they're going to do an episode about the characters. So I'm super excited to listen to this.  Jessika: Oh, that's super fun.  Mike: Yeah, Jessika: See, and I was going to talk about the same thing.  Mike: I'm sorry, I stole your thunder. Jessika: No, that's okay though. They're so good. So I'm that person who has to start from episode one, because. Mike: They've got a lot of episodes too. Jessika: They do they're back to 2018. So  I just went all the way back and it's so [00:45:00] fun though. I like to get that rapport. I like to make sure I have that parasocial, you know, relationship really hooked in there with all the podcasts I listen to. So, the first section that they did cause they always do kind of like a month at a time, focused on one set of characters. The first one was the relationship facets of Jean Gray and Scott Summers from the X-Men. And I love the X-Men. So, it was really neat to hear all of the different ways that they had a relationship and then they were comparing it to a book about relationships. It was very interesting. It was very topical, and I liked that they also are very sweet and introspective about their own relationship. Mike: It's really lovely.  Jessika: Yeah. And like what they can do, what they can take out of it to apply to their own marriage, which is it's so sweet. So thank you guys. You guys are great.  Mike: Yeah. Comic Book Couples Counseling, Brad and [00:46:00] Lisa, absolutely friends of the podcast.  Jessika: Absolutely.  Mike: And you know, if they ever want to come on here, they are more than welcome and we will talk about whatever they want to talk about.  Jessika: Open invitation. I'll even read a I'll even. I'm not in a couple, but I'll read a self-help book. Like if that's what it takes.  Mike:  All right. I think that's all from us. we'll be back in two weeks and until then, we'll see you in the stacks.  Thanks for listening to Ten Cent Takes. Accessibility is important to us, so text transcriptions of each of our published episodes can be found on our website.  This episode was hosted by Jessika Frazer and Mike Thompson written by Mike Thompson and edited by Jessika Frazer. Our intro theme was written and performed by Jared Emerson- Johnson of Bay Area Sound, our credits and transition music is Pursuit of Life by Evan MacDonald, and was purchased with a standard license from PremiumBeat. Our banner graphics were [00:47:00] designed by Sarah Frank. You can find on Instagram as @lookmomdraws. Jessika: If you'd like to get in touch with us, ask us questions or tell us about how we got something wrong, please head over to tencenttakes.com, or shoot an email to tencenttakes@gmail.com. You can also find us on Twitter, the official podcast account is @tencenttakes. Jessika is @jessikawitha, and Jessika is spelled with a K, and Mike is @vansau, V A N S A U. Mike: If you'd like to support us, be sure to download, rate and review wherever you listen. Jessika: Stay safe out there.  Mike: And support your local comic shop.

The Toy Tomb
Episode 37 - US1 Electric Trucking

The Toy Tomb

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021


 In this episode Arkay and Willie! talk about some of the cool slot sets from Tyco featuring trucks and hauling!Download Here:Links:Tyco US1 Electric Trucking Resource Evel Knievel Stunt Cycle World Record Jump US1 Marvel Comics New Wave Toys Qbert

Expert Talk with TGo
S06E15 - Real Estate Investing Expert - Bryce McKinley Expert Talk 9@9

Expert Talk with TGo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 10:54


Bryce is an International Best-Selling Author and one of the Top 5 Sales Trainers in The World! With over 20 years of working with various Fortune 500 companies including but not limited to the likes of Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT. Helping each of them transform their sales process to focus on better conversations and building better relationships. Bryce stumbled onto wholesaling real estate and figured out how to use what he knew about sales to generate leads and start closing deals his first month. What's more impressive is he didn't spend a dime on advertising and did it all from his local library and the back seat of his car. #ExpertTalkWithTGo #ExpertTalkXtra #TalkShow #PodcastToBroadcast #TheresaGoss #ExpertTalkFM #Roku #Pandora #iHeartRADIO #PodNationTV #talkshowtv #talkshowonline #talkshowhost #podcast #motivation #broadcast #listennow #entrepreneur #marketing #TGoTV #9@9 #FastFunInformative #LightsCamerasTakeAction

The Barretta Brothers
Q&A Episode #04 with Kevin Clash and Tyler Bunch

The Barretta Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 75:55


On this episode, The Barretta Brothers take questions from the Live Youtube chat, with special surprise visits by Muppet performer, puppeteer, producer, and director, Kevin Clash. Plus, actor, voice actor, Muppet performer, puppeteer, Tyler Bunch.   ABOUT OUR HOSTS: Gene Barretta & Bill Barretta “What are they up to now?” That was the popular question around their house and neighborhood while growing up. It was not unusual to see Gene and Bill dressed up in homemade costumes – filming Super 8mm dramas – attempting risky stunts in the ravine – animating GI Joes and weird-looking clay figures – building and performing clunky puppets – drawing offbeat comics, - and imitating The Beatles. Today, life isn't very different. In addition to personal projects and various acting roles, Bill has been a director, writer, producer and core performer with The Muppets for nearly 30 years. Gene is an award-winning author and illustrator of children's books. He has also animated and illustrated for Sesame Street, Between the Lions, and The Jim Henson Company. The best part of their careers is that they occasionally get to work together! Unfortunately, no one will pay them to imitate The Beatles.   ABOUT OUR GUESTS: Kevin Clash: Kevin Clash is best known for Elmo (Sesame Street) 1979-2012. He also was part of Labyrinth (1986), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1 (1990) and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 (1991), Happy Time Murders (SFX) 2018, and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (Netflix) 2019. In addition to Elmo, Clash is also known for performing Splinter (TMNT) Baby Sinclair (Dinosaurs), and Clifford (Muppets Tonight). Kevin Clash has won 29 daytime Emmys, over one hundred fifty -six performing title credits, thirty- one producing title credits and twenty- seven directing title credits. In 2011, his documentary, Being Elmo, was awarded the Special Jury Prize at Sundance. He has appeared in numerous television specials, commercials, feature films and direct-to-video products. During his career, he has worked with great innovators who founded the classic puppet television industry including Kermit Love, Frank Oz, and Jim Henson. Clash has recruited, auditioned, and trained puppeteers from all over the world. He was the senior puppet coordinator, and was also a director, co-producer and senior creative adviser on Sesame Street.  Kevin was essential to the success of Elmo's World and the creative branding powerhouse of Elmo. Business Insider states that in 1996 the toy company Tyco saw their sales grow from $70 million to an astounding $350 million thanks to the Tickle Me Elmo Doll. Clash's most recent project, Earth to Ned, will be airing on Disney+ this Fall and he currently has several projects in development.     Tyler Bunch: Tyler's work as a puppeteer has appeared in productions like Sesame Street, Bear in the Big Blue House, Between the Lions, and Crank Yankers. As an actor, he has appeared in The Electric Company, Law & Order “Criminal Intent” and “Special Victims Unit.”

Call Her Daddy Busted
tyco waykeekkee

Call Her Daddy Busted

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 57:52


dreaym

20 Minute Leaders
Ep460: Ofir Bar Levav | Chief Business Officer, Indoor Robotics

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 0:28


Ofir started his career in Procter & Gamble where he spent 12 years in various management roles in Finance, strategy, BD, and M&A working on many P&G brands (Pampers, Haircare, Gillette, etc) and including 2 relocations periods in Europe (Belgium, Switzerland). He moved to Tyco running finance for the security products division and later on BD & M&A for the division. He joined Johnson Controls as it acquired Tyco and was the general manager for the global open innovation platform. A year ago he joined Indoor Robotics as Chief Business Officer. Ofir also serves as a venture advisor at Spider Capital.

The Barretta Brothers
Kevin Clash and Jane Gootnick PART TWO

The Barretta Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 85:58


On this two-part episode, The Barretta Brothers welcome Performer, Director, Producer, Kevin Clash - and Designer, Art Director, Puppet builder, Jane Gootnick.   Episode Outline: Gene & Bill discuss Gene's “Billy Puppet” sketch.   Jane Gootnick –  2:48-37:40mis Jane discusses Character Sal Minella Designing and building a perfect puppet character Sir Didymus and Brian Froud designs Dinosaurs Dog from The Storyteller Working with animatronic servos Fraggle Rock characters: Trash Heap, Philo and Gunge Storyteller Bunny Dark Crystal Creatures Andy Warhol and David Bowie stories Miss Piggy Photo Shoot   Kevin Clash – 39:10 – 1:23:00 Kevin discusses the special The Muppets Celebrate Jim Henson Clifford and Muppets Tonight Michelle Pfeiffer Sandra Bullock Splinter Muppets Go to Disney World and Jim Henson Arsenio Hall show along with Jim Henson Fat Blue and Jim Henson Baby from Dinosaurs Elmo and his Dad, Louie from Beginnings Gene, Bill, and Kevin work together on Fox & Friends Kevin assigning Gene and performer wives to do background characters on Muppet Treasure Island Muppet Treasure Island characters Happytime Murders Learning from other puppeteers The new Dark Crystal Earth to Ned Gene & Bill's drag photos Bill tells Kevin how proud he is of him Getting a cab in NY The song/segment “Proud” from Families Stand Together and their funny recording session   Gene and Bill announce the winner of a viewer contest. ABOUT OUR GUESTS:   JANE GOOTNICK   With college degrees in both acting and set design Jane first moved to Europe working in Belgium and London. In the mid-70's she moved to NYC working with alternative theatre groups (LaMama, Joe Papp's Public Theatre). Jane became head sculptor at Brooks Van Horn Costume Co. making props, masks and creatures for a large variety of venues: Broadway shows (Sweeney Todd, Dracula, Peter Pan), feature films (The Wiz, Hair), Warner Bros walkarounds, commercials,  Ringling Bros Circus, and the first four seasons of Saturday Night Live. In 1978, the costume designer for SNL mentioned that the Jim Henson Company was looking for sculptors for a film called The Dark Crystal and suggested she interview. Jane was offered three weeks work to build a prototype support harness for the Skeksis they were developing. So, she left her three-year full-time job for three weeks of work at Henson's and stayed 40 years! Jane has worked in both the New York puppet shop and the London Creature Shop throughout the years. Designing/building puppets and creatures, supervising builds, and running workshops on location for Muppet/Henson films and TV series, (Dark Crystal, Muppet Show, Sesame Street, Fraggle Rock, Labyrinth, The Storyteller, The Witches, Ninja Turtles, Dinosaurs, Muppets Tonight, The Muppets, etc.). She has also worked on a variety of talk shows, game shows, and awards shows (Oscars, Grammys, Hollywood Bowl and many more). Jane is an art director for print and media photoshoots, film posters and endless fashion shoots with Miss Piggy with Louis Vuitton   KEVIN CLASH Kevin Clash is best known for Elmo (Sesame Street) 1979-2012. He also was part of Labyrinth (1986), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1 (1990) and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 (1991), Happytime Murders (SFX) 2018, and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (Netflix) 2019. In addition to Elmo, Clash is also known for performing Splinter (TMNT) Baby Sinclair (Dinosaurs), and Clifford (Muppets Tonight). Kevin Clash has won 29 daytime Emmys, over one hundred fifty -six performing title credits, thirty- one producing title credits and twenty- seven directing title credits. In 2011, his documentary, Being Elmo, was awarded the Special Jury Prize at Sundance. He has appeared in numerous television specials, commercials, feature films and direct-to-video products. During his career, he has worked with great innovators who founded the classic puppet television industry including Kermit Love, Frank Oz, and Jim Henson. Clash has recruited, auditioned, and trained puppeteers from all over the world. He was the senior puppet coordinator, and was also a director, co-producer and senior creative adviser on Sesame Street.  Kevin was essential to the success of Elmo's World and the creative branding powerhouse of Elmo. Business Insider states that in 1996 the toy company Tyco saw their sales grow from $70 million to an astounding $350 million thanks to the Tickle Me Elmo Doll. Clash's most recent project, Earth to Ned, will be airing on Disney+ this Fall and he currently has several projects in development. 

The Barretta Brothers
Jane Gootnick and Kevin Clash Part One

The Barretta Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 65:41


On this two-part episode, The Barretta Brothers welcome Performer, Director, Producer, Kevin Clash -  and Designer, Art Director, Puppet builder, Jane Gootnick. Episode Outline: Jane Gootnick – 07:50 – 34:00 mins Jane talks about her very impression family tree and the early years People who originally inspired her. Pre-Henson work in NY, including SNL. Her start with Sesame Street and The Jim Henson Company. A review of characters she helped create. Gene & Bill announce details for a second Muppet Trivia Contest Kevin Clash –36:20 – 1:03:23 mins A funny wedding story. Stories about his childhood and early training at home. Working on the Captain Kangaroo & The Great Space Coaster. Puppet workshops with Jane Henson and starting at Sesame Street. The origins of Elmo with Richard Hunt. Elmo's connection with kids. Working with Jim Henson. The very first character he performed for Sesame Street. The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade ABOUT OUR GUESTS: KEVIN CLASH Kevin Clash is best known for Elmo (Sesame Street) 1979-2012. He also was part of Labyrinth (1986), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1 (1990) and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 (1991), Happytime Murders (SFX) 2018, and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (Netflix) 2019. In addition to Elmo, Clash is also known for performing Splinter (TMNT) Baby Sinclair (Dinosaurs), and Clifford (Muppets Tonight).   Kevin Clash has won 29 daytime Emmys, over one hundred fifty -six performing title credits, thirty- one producing title credits and twenty- seven directing title credits. In 2011, his documentary, Being Elmo, was awarded the Special Jury Prize at Sundance. He has appeared in numerous television specials, commercials, feature films and direct-to-video products. During his career, he has worked with great innovators who founded the classic puppet television industry including Kermit Love, Frank Oz, and Jim Henson. Clash has recruited, auditioned, and trained puppeteers from all over the world. He was the senior puppet coordinator, and was also a director, co-producer and senior creative adviser on Sesame Street.  Kevin was essential to the success of Elmo's World and the creative branding powerhouse of Elmo. Business Insider states that in 1996 the toy company Tyco saw their sales grow from $70 million to an astounding $350 million thanks to the Tickle Me Elmo Doll. Clash's most recent project, Earth to Ned, will be airing on Disney+ this Fall and he currently has several projects in development.    JANE GOOTNICK With college degrees in both acting and set design Jane first moved to Europe working in Belgium and London. In the mid-70's she moved to NYC working with alternative theatre groups (LaMama, Joe Papp's Public Theatre). Jane became head sculptor at Brooks Van Horn Costume Co. making props, masks and creatures for a large variety of venues: Broadway shows (Sweeney Todd, Dracula, Peter Pan), feature films (The Wiz, Hair), Warner Bros walkarounds, commercials,  Ringling Bros Circus, and the first four seasons of Saturday Night Live. In 1978, the costume designer for SNL mentioned that the Jim Henson Company was looking for sculptors for a film called The Dark Crystal and suggested she interview. Jane was offered three weeks work to build a prototype support harness for the Skeksis they were developing. So, she left her three-year full-time job for three weeks of work at Henson's and stayed 40 years!   Jane has worked in both the New York puppet shop and the London Creature Shop throughout the years. Designing/building puppets and creatures, supervising builds, and running workshops on location for Muppet/Henson films and TV series, (Dark Crystal, Muppet Show, Sesame Street, Fraggle Rock, Labyrinth, The Storyteller, The Witches, Ninja Turtles, Dinosaurs, Muppets Tonight, The Muppets, etc.). She has also worked on a variety of talk shows, game shows, and awards shows (Oscars, Grammys, Hollywood Bowl and many more). Jane is an art director for print and media photoshoots, film posters and endless fashion shoots with Miss Piggy with Louis Vuitton, Prada and other diva designers.

Expert Talk with TGo
S05E12 Coach SHARPEN - Bryce McKinley

Expert Talk with TGo

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2021 55:29


Bryce is globally recognized as one of The Top 5 Sales Trainer & Independent Business Consultant, In The World! He Works with businesses including but not limited to, Fortune 500 Companies such as Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT. He has been selling since he was eight years old, and training Sales Professionals for over 20 years! This has allowed him to become a Master Closer and Negotiator! Most recently, he has taken these abilities into real estate, where his team has had over 7000 homes Bought and/or Sold COMPLETELY VIRTUAL. As CEO of S.H.A.R.P.E.N., a nonprofit in which they help and serve the less fortunate, they are changing the world one life at a time! #SHARPEN #ExpertTalkFm #ExpertTalkWithTGo #TalkShow #AmazonPrime #AmazonMusic #entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #media #contentcreator #contentmarketing #smallbusiness #live #interview #socialmedia #socialmediamarketing #accountability #motivation #motivational #success #wealth #sharpen #Coach Sharpen #REIResultsAcademy.com #EveryHouse.io

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs
How To Grow A Multi Million Dollar Wholesaling Company After Overcoming Homelessness & Addiction With Bryce Mckinley

The A Game Podcast: Real Estate Investing For Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 69:52


Join Nick Lamagna on The A Game Podcast with guest Bryce Mckinley, founder of REI Results Academy and Every House, a national real estate investing company. Bryce has perfected the sales conversation over 20 years of consulting with various Fortune 500 companies like Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT and sharing the stage as a keynote speaker with such names such as Tai Lopez.  Bryce stumbled on wholesaling real estate while he was living out of his car.  He figured out how to use what he knew about sales to generate leads and start closing deals his first month. What's more impressive is he didn't spend a dime on advertising and did it all from his local library.  Using his unique rapport building (Warm with FORM) and questioning (RAQ) technique he's been able to close almost every deal over the phone, only ever walking 4 properties Topics on this episode include: How Bryce overcame addiction and major personal tragedy to become positive and successful  The importance of shifting your mind to focus and achieve your goals Tactical tips on how to approach issues in life and business using easy to remember acronyms What the 1% do that you should be doing daily Learning to ask for advice The importance of utilizing others experience to save you time and money in business What separates those who succeed from those who do not What are common mistakes new investors make What are some things to look for when choosing a market to invest in  And More! Check out Naked Warrior Recovery CBD and please subscribe to the podcast.  See show notes for all the ways to connect with Bryce and contact Nick to start doing some real estate deals together! ~ Connect with Bryce Mckinley: Bryce Mckinley on Instagram Bryce Mckinley on Linked https://reiresultsacademy.com/ Bryce Mckinley on Facebook https://everyhouse.io/ --- Connect with Nick Lamagna 630.384.9443 www.NickNickNick.com Click here discounted CBD from Naked Warrior Recovery!!! Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here   Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes on Platforms by Clicking Here To Subscribe Find all social media connections at Social media Links for Facebook, IG, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.

White Collars, Red Hands
The Tyco Roman Orgy- Dennis Kozlowski

White Collars, Red Hands

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 45:51


This week we talk blind congressmen, our craziest party stories, and a scandal that rocked Tyco, a company on the S&P 500 , and took down it's CEO who was once the highest paid corporate executive in America: Dennis Kozlowski.

The Barretta Brothers
Muppet Mini: Kevin Clash Remembers Jim Henson, Jerry Nelson, Richard Hunt, Carroll Spinney and Jerry Nelson

The Barretta Brothers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 23:32


On this episode, The Barretta Brothers welcome Performer, Director, and Producer, Kevin Clash. Episode Outline: Kevin remembers special moments and pays tribute to: Richard Hunt Caroll Spinney Jerry Nelson Jane Henson Jim Henson ABOUT OUR GUEST: KEVIN CLASH Kevin Clash is best known for Elmo (Sesame Street) 1979-2012. He also was part of Labyrinth (1986), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1 (1990) and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 (1991), Happytime Murders (SFX) 2018, and The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (Netflix) 2019. In addition to Elmo, Clash is also known for performing Splinter (TMNT) Baby Sinclair (Dinosaurs), and Clifford (Muppets Tonight). Kevin Clash has won 29 daytime Emmys, over one hundred fifty -six performing title credits, thirty- one producing title credits and twenty- seven directing title credits. In 2011, his documentary, Being Elmo, was awarded the Special Jury Prize at Sundance. He has appeared in numerous television specials, commercials, feature films and direct-to-video products. During his career, he has worked with great innovators who founded the classic puppet television industry including Kermit Love, Frank Oz, and Jim Henson. Clash has recruited, auditioned, and trained puppeteers from all over the world. He was the senior puppet coordinator, and was also a director, co-producer and senior creative adviser on Sesame Street.  Kevin was essential to the success of Elmo's World and the creative branding powerhouse of Elmo. Business Insider states that in 1996 the toy company Tyco saw their sales grow from $70 million to an astounding $350 million thanks to the Tickle Me Elmo Doll. Clash's most recent project, Earth to Ned, will be airing on Disney+ this Fall, and he currently has several projects in development. 

Hindsight HacKing
HH - BRYCE MCKINLEY - The PERFECT Sales Conversation

Hindsight HacKing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 49:09


“Always another explanation” A quote from Bryce and advice that we all should take into consideration.  Hindsight HacKing was joined by a true real estate and sales professional with Bryce McKinley.Bryce has perfected the sales conversation over 20 years of working with various Fortune 500 companies like Ford, Nissan, Tyco and ADT.  Helping each of them each transform their sales process to focus on better conversation and building better relationships.  Now after 9 years of wholesaling real estate he has completed over 8000 deals and only walked 5 properties.  Yes, if you are interested in the real estate game Bryce is the one you want to listen to because he has a coaching program where he teaches all the same tools that he uses for his real estate and gives it to his 1100+ students that by the way have had 100% success rate coming out of his training.Connect With Bryce:https://reiresultsacademy.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryce-mckinley-68389737/ Connect with Cory and Ron:Head over to Https://profitswithpodcasts.com to find out more about how your can easily launch and monetize a podcast.Or maybe you would like to learn more by jumping on a call with the guys?  Just book a time that works for you!https://calendly.com/hindsighthacking/connect?back=1&month=2020-11https://follow.coolhttps://www.facebook.com/coryecarter Or you just want to check out their websites:Https://gethhm.comHttps://gethhm.com/editing

Segunda Conectada
Como o curso técnico mudou a minha vida e me levou para o mundo de automacao por Victor Venâncio

Segunda Conectada

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 97:57


Nosso convidado do dia 19/4/21 é o Victor Venâncio Dias, M.Sc, MBA Head of Digital Transformation – IHM Stefanini Group. Victor é técnico em instrumentação e automação, engenheiro de produção e mecatrônico, com MBA em gestão econômica e estratégica de negócios pela FGV-Management, mestrado em administração estratégica pela FGV-EBAPE e Senior Executive Program pela ESADE Business School de Barcelona. Com +25 anos de experiência em automação industrial, corporativa e predial, atuando em grandes empresas de tecnologia no Brasil e América Latina, como GE, Tyco, Mokveld e KPMG. Também é Diretor do comitê Global para Smart Manufacturing e IIoT da ISA (International Society of Automation), Diretor de estratégia e parcerias da ISA Seção Rio de Janeiro, Líder do Grupo de Trabalho sobre Convergência OT-IT do conselho de Transformação Digital do IBP ( Instituto Brasileiro do Petróleo ), coordenador do Open Innovation BR Squad RJ e membro da Câmara setorial de Equipamentos navais, offshore e Onshore da ABIMAQ. Participa também da Câmara Brasileira da Indústria 4.0 do MCTI – Governo do Brasil.

No Limits Selling
Stephen Hall on How to Go Into Larger Accounts

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 25:03


Stephen Hall received his MBA from Rollins College, Winter Park, FL and began a successful selling career that led him into sales training, regional management and becoming Vice President of Sales for Sensormatic Electronics, a world leader in the electronic security field and a Fortune 500 company (now owned by TYCO).      He has managed sales teams as few as 5 and as many as 120 and revenue from $5M to $130M before becoming CEO of a $20M company.  Despite the tough economic slide of 2008, his business grew from $10M to $20M in a four-year period and doubled both the employee base and number of customers.  In that time, his expertise went beyond sales to operations, finance and acquisitions. As a resident of Annapolis since 2000, Steve’s desire to get out of the corporate boardroom and help mid-tier businesses led him to acquire his own business as a Trainer, Mentor and Coach for companies and individual clients.  His business, Maryland Sales Training & Management Development relied on Steve’s field expertise in business leadership positions – not just in selling, but also Management, Leadership, Behavioral training, and social media promotion through LinkedIn, Facebook and email blasts.  He is a certified DISC instructor and Outmatch (formerly Devine Inventory) Assessments leader. Steve has been a conference speaker and is a great connector through his networking experiences.  In addition to his coaching and mentoring, Steve has served on the Rotary Club of Annapolis’ board of directors, the Y of Central Maryland’s Community Leadership Board and is a competitor and coach for the Annapolis Rowing Club.  He is an Emeritus Board Director for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, headquartered in Alexandria, VA.   Contact Stephen: Website LinkedIn twitter

Fire Sprinkler Podcast
Ft. Bob Cordell from JCI Discussing Tyco's LFP Antifreeze+

Fire Sprinkler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 30:37


This episode of the fire sprinkler podcast is my conversation with Bob Cordell from JCI. We discuss Tyco’s new LFP Antfreeze+. Available in Canada and the US, this new antifreeze is listed for -32C, The coldest listed antifreeze on the market. Another great conversation getting into the development, design requirements, and more!

Modern Career
Episode 20: A Chief Human Resources Officer Perspective with Lisa Mulrooney Gross

Modern Career

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 29:09


Listen to other episodes in the Chief Human Resources Officer Perspective series In our Chief Human Resources Officer Perspective series, Mary sits down with CHROs from around the world to uncover insider knowledge about navigating a modern career. The next guest in the series is Lisa Mulrooney Gross, CHRO of Fitbit at Google. In this episode, she discusses her inspiration for her career journey including balancing life and career, insider insights on growing as a modern leader, personal branding and the essential mindset for success. Lisa Mulrooney Gross is currently the CHRO for Fitbit at Google where she leads the people strategy for one of the coolest, most unique and innovative digital healthcare companies on the planet; Fitbit, recently acquired by Google. Lisa has been an HR leader for Bayer, Applied Materials, Tyco and has also been an entrepreneur. She earned her BA in Psychology from The University of California at Los Angeles and her MA in Organizational psychology at Columbia University. She is a Board Member for Girls Inc, is an avid outdoor adventurer and lives in California with her family. Resources mentioned in this episode * Control Your Destiny or Somebody Else Will by Noel M. Tichy and Stratford Sherman

Sauropod: Podcasting the 21st Century
090: Good Ad Vice - Monster Cereals Of 1990

Sauropod: Podcasting the 21st Century

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 65:32


It's pilot season at the Sauropod, and we've got a real firecracker for you. Journey through time and space to watch some old commercials that once manipulated humans into thinking that every girl needed a dolly that could only be enjoyed after a complex process chain was completed, and that every boy was a denim-wearing monster whose whims must be humored by society. Yes, it's quite a world we've created, and we can probably thank the good folks at Tyco for supplying the blocks for its foundation. Featuring Shrishma Naik, Katherine Sherlock, and Justin Zeppa. We appreciate your support, so please subscribe, rate, review, and follow the show. Tell all your friends, tell your enemies too. Instagram: @thesauropod Facebook: facebook.com/thesauropod Email: info@thesauropod.com www.thesauropod.com

Fire Protection Podcast
Navigating NFPA with Terry Victor

Fire Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2021 43:42


TIMELINE:Introductions (2:32)Terry's 20 Committees (4:26)Terry's History (5:12)Drew's History (8:13)The Kozlowski days of Tyco (8:55)Value of Fire Protection (12:00)A Noble Industry (13:27)20 Different Standards?! (14:45)NFPA13, 14, 11, 16, and 25 (15:46)NFPA303 - Marinas, Docks & Boat Yards (18:18)NFPA4 - Test Agents (19:48)Remote Testing, FDNY, COVID, and IoT (25:28)The Cost of Freeze Ups  (30:00)Allowances for Equipment in Systems (34:40)Quick Response Round (35:34)Crab Cakes or Boiled Crab? (35:55)Discussed in this Episode: Johnson Controls (JCI), NFPA Codes and Standards, Inspection Data Collection, Internet of Things (IoT), Remote Monitoring and Testingwww.johnsoncontrols.comhttps://www.johnsoncontrols.com/services-and-support/fire-maintenance-and-support/smart-connected-fire-sprinkler-monitoringhttps://www.johnsoncontrols.com/fire-suppression/connected-fire-container-monitoring   

FLAUNT! Build Your Dreams, Live Your Sparkle
Overwhelmed & Over It! Lead With Your Heart, Choose What Means the Most, & Find Your Calm With Christine Arylo

FLAUNT! Build Your Dreams, Live Your Sparkle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2021 59:20


o you feel like you are constantly treading water, hoping not to sink? If so, like successful women everywhere, you are overwhelmed. Being overwhelmed keeps you stressed, unhappy, and not in your power. It doesn’t have to be that way! Join Christine Arylo and learn simple tips for breaking out of overwhelm and finding the peace you crave. Top take-a-ways: How to stay focused on your mission and your part and stop getting distracted because you are doing everything for everyone else. Learn to balance between being a non-stop-work-machine and self-sacrificing martyr and stand in your power with clarity. The art and practice of getting real with yourself, so you can release what no longer serves you, preserve what does, and create the kind of life you desire. Christine Arylo combines 20 years of corporate and entrepreneurial experience in brand marketing, business strategy, human resources, and leadership development for companies like Gap Inc., Visa, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Tyco and PepsiCo, with 20 years of wisdom-based training on conscious leadership, human potential, indigenous and feminine wisdom, and yogic science to guide people to lead their lives, businesses, organizations and relationships differently. For more than a decade, through her transformation-based consulting company, Expanding Possibility, she has been a catalyst, mentor, and advisor for established and emerging leaders on 6 continents. From business organizations such as Salesforce, Genentech, and Google, to social impact entrepreneurs daring to make change, to change makers and influencers in a wide spectrum of industries, including healthcare, law, government, financial, tech, education and academia and more. Her work and presence hits home for all people seeking to create a better world – for humanity, the people they love and lead, and themselves. Her blended approach to leadership gives those who work with Arylo access to expanded levels of self-awareness, resilience, presence, insight and the courage to lead the way to new ways of working, living, creating and relating. Feeling worn down and dull? Hoping for a little more sparkle, joy and enthusiasm in your day? Then sashay on over to www.NakedSelfWorth.com and download The Top 20 Things That Block Your Sparkle And What to Do About Them today!

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Flaunt! Build Your Dreams, Live Your Sparkle! with Lora Cheadle

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 59:20


Overwhelmed and Over It – Lead With Your Heart, Choose What Means the Most, & Find Your Calm   With Christine AryloDecember, the last month of the craziest year any of us have probably ever experienced. How can you close out 2020 and “Sparkle All Season” with joy, gratitude, enthusiasm, and satisfaction despite everything that’s going on? Join my free challenge at www.SparkleAllSeason.com and listen in all month long to find out how!Do you feel like you are constantly treading water, hoping not to sink? If so, like successful women everywhere, you are overwhelmed. Being overwhelmed keeps you stressed, unhappy, and not in your power. It doesn’t have to be that way! Join Christine Arylo and learn simple tips for breaking out of overwhelm and finding the peace you crave.Top take-a-ways:How to stay focused on your mission and your part and stop getting distracted because you are doing everything for everyone else.Learn to balance between being a non-stop-work-machineand self-sacrificing martyr and stand in your power with clarity.The art and practice of getting real with yourself, so you can release what no longer serves you, preserve what does, and create the kind of life you desire.Christine Arylo combines 20 years of corporate and entrepreneurial experience in brand marketing, business strategy, human resources, and leadership development for companies like Gap Inc., Visa, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Tyco and PepsiCo, with 20 years of wisdom-based training on conscious leadership, human potential, indigenous and feminine wisdom, and yogic science to guide people to lead their lives, businesses, organizations and relationships differently.For more than a decade, through her transformation-based consulting company, Expanding Possibility, she has been a catalyst, mentor, and advisor for established and emerging leaders on 6 continents.From business organizations such as Salesforce, Genentech, and Google, to social impact entrepreneurs daring to make change, to change makers and influencers in a wide spectrum of industries, including healthcare, law, government, financial, tech, education and academia and more. Her work and presence hits home for all people seeking to create a better world – for humanity, the people they love and lead, and themselves.Her blended approach to leadership gives those who work with Arylo access to expanded levels of self-awareness, resilience, presence, insight and the courage to lead the way to new ways of working, living, creating and relating.Feeling worn down and dull? Hoping for a little more sparkle, joy and enthusiasm in your day? Then sashay on over to www.NakedSelfWorth.com and download The Top 20 Things That Block Your Sparkle And What to Do About Them today!Still want more? Of course, you do! Purchase Lora’s book, FLAUNT! Drop Your Cover and Reveal Your Smart, Sexy & Spiritual Self wherever books are sold.Learn more about Lora here: www.loracheadle.com

FLAUNT! Build Your Dreams, Live Your Sparkle
Overwhelmed and Over It – Lead With Your Heart, Choose What Means the Most, & Find Your Calm

FLAUNT! Build Your Dreams, Live Your Sparkle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2020 59:20


Do you feel like you are constantly treading water, hoping not to sink? If so, like successful women everywhere, you are overwhelmed. Being overwhelmed keeps you stressed, unhappy, and not in your power. It doesn’t have to be that way! Join Christine Arylo and learn simple tips for breaking out of overwhelm and finding the peace you crave. Top take-a-ways: How to stay focused on your mission and your part and stop getting distracted because you are doing everything for everyone else. Learn to balance between being a non-stop-work-machine and self-sacrificing martyr and stand in your power with clarity. The art and practice of getting real with yourself, so you can release what no longer serves you, preserve what does, and create the kind of life you desire. Christine Arylo combines 20 years of corporate and entrepreneurial experience in brand marketing, business strategy, human resources, and leadership development for companies like Gap Inc., Visa, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Tyco and PepsiCo, with 20 years of wisdom-based training on conscious leadership, human potential, indigenous and feminine wisdom, and yogic science to guide people to lead their lives, businesses, organizations and relationships differently. For more than a decade, through her transformation-based consulting company, Expanding Possibility, she has been a catalyst, mentor, and advisor for established and emerging leaders on 6 continents. From business organizations such as Salesforce, Genentech, and Google, to social impact entrepreneurs daring to make change, to change makers and influencers in a wide spectrum of industries, including healthcare, law, government, financial, tech, education and academia and more. Her work and presence hits home for all people seeking to create a better world – for humanity, the people they love and lead, and themselves. Her blended approach to leadership gives those who work with Arylo access to expanded levels of self-awareness, resilience, presence, insight and the courage to lead the way to new ways of working, living, creating and relating. Feeling worn down and dull? Hoping for a little more sparkle, joy and enthusiasm in your day? Then sashay on over to www.NakedSelfWorth.com and download The Top 20 Things That Block Your Sparkle And What to Do About Them today! Still want more? Of course you do! Purchase Lora’s book, FLAUNT! Drop Your Cover and Reveal Your Smart, Sexy & Spiritual Self wherever books are sold.

Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein
David Chun: "The Demand For New Directors Will Increase Exponentially Over the Next 12-24 Months, and Equilar is Working to Help on the Supply Side."

Boardroom Governance with Evan Epstein

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2020 50:46


(1:40) - Start of interview(2:38) - David's "origin story"(4:49) - The founding of Equilar in 2000.The modern "corporate governance" era started after the corporate scandals of the early 2000s (Enron, Tyco, Adelphia, WorldCom, etc.) and the passage of SOX in 2002. "Very few people talked about corporate governance in the 1990s"With this new focus on corporate governance, there was a lot of attention given to exec comp.(9:56) -  The Board's role in setting compensation for the CEO: "It's a very tricky decision, and there is no right answer." "Compensation is a very emotional and difficult decision, with many different stakeholders involved." (11:33) - Their work on the investors' side (Calpers, Vanguard, Blackrock, etc).(12:11) -  They made a conscious decision from day one to track the trajectories of executives and directors from SEC data, which has resulted in the development of their BoardEdge Product.(13:59) - His take on Say on Pay regulation: it increased significantly the amount of shareholder engagement.(17:05) - His take on Elon Musk's ~$55bn comp package at Tesla and other 100% at-risk performance awards. (19:33) - The Nasdaq-Equilar Strategic Partnership on boardroom diversity (announced on Dec 9, 2020).Distinctions with CA laws SB-826 and AB-979.Equilar's BoardEdge product includes one million executives and directors.Equilar's Diversity Network (36 Partner Institutions, 5,158 Member Profiles, 2,044 board appointments) "Registry of registries"      (30:53) - The challenge of meeting the new boardroom diversity requirements set by SB-826, AB-979 and Nasdaq. "There is a need for more candidates who are not on boards." "The demand will go up exponentially in the next 12-24 months, and Equilar is working to help on the supply side."(32:27) - The latest trends on director compensation, and impact of COVID-19 on boards (Stanford/Equilar study).(35:09) - His take on the current state of private and public capital markets (the "window is wide open for going public, but when the market shuts down - it will shut down hard")(37:03) - His thoughts on the latest trend of companies and executives leaving SF/Bay Area/CA to TX, FL, etc.(39:30) - His take on the stakeholder vs shareholder debate as a CEO and executive compensation expert.(42:04) - His favorite books:The Hard Things About Hard Things, by Ben Horowitz (2014)Measure What Matters  How Google, Bono, and the Gates Foundation Rock the World with OKRs, by John Doerr (2018)(43:11) - His mentors (his dad, and his best friend's dad in high school).(44:30) - His favorite quote: "Skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it is today" (Wayne Gretsky)(45:42) - His "unusual habit": a classic multitasker.(47:00) - The living person he most admires: Warren Buffett.(48:00) - His final thought on where the puck is going on governance: boardroom diversity beyond public companies: private companies, PE, VC, non-profits, etc. Human capital metrics will become increasingly more relevant. David Chun is the founder & CEO of Equilar, a Silicon Valley based leading provider of corporate leadership data solutions. Companies of all sizes rely on Equilar for business development, recruiting, executive compensation and shareholder engagement, including 70% of the Fortune 500 and institutional investors representing over $20 trillion in assets.In addition, David is a Trustee of the Committee for Economic Development (CED) and serves on the boards of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group (SVLG) and the Asian Pacific Fund Community Foundation of San Francisco. He is on Catalyst’s Women on Board Advisory Council, the Silicon Valley Advisory Council of the Commonwealth Club of California, the Women on Boards Advisory Council of the California Partners Project and the Advisory Council of the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation.David is a also a member of the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO), Past Chair of the SF Bay Chapter, a founding member of the Council of Korean Americans (CKA) and a former advisory board member of the Wharton Center for Entrepreneurship.__Follow Evan on Twitter @evanepsteinMusic/Soundtrack (found via Free Music Archive): Seeing The Future by Dexter Britain is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License  

For Your Records Pod
Ep. 30: "The Jhene Effect" feat. Tyco

For Your Records Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2020 78:07


On this week's episode I am with Tyco and we talk about the Cleveland music scene, his journey in music and how it led him to start massaging. We also talk about the changes in music so quickly and how they can effect people's taste altogether, how to trap people with music, and why do artists sit on tracks. We shine the spotlight on who will be relevant still in the music world five years from now.You like the song you heard at the end? Tyco - Fall ThruFollow him on IG @tycoinky an book a massage with him at @body.mechanixx

Inside Access Control
EP 100: Reinforcing Facial Recognition with AI with Raf Schrijvers of Tyco

Inside Access Control

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2020 13:23


In this episode of Inside Access Control, sponsored by the Security Industry Association, Lee sits down with Raf Schrijvers, Senior Product Manager for Access Control at Tyco.

The ROI Podcast
Why do some organizations make poor ethical decisions? | Ep. 155

The ROI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 29:33


Whether it's Enron or Tyco, some organizations simply have a hard time playing by the rules. But how do companies get so far off the rails? Do organizational leaders wake up one day and decide to be corrupt? Or might their ethical erosion start small and grow over time? Could there also be a few bad apples that make the whole bunch look bad? On this episode, we're sitting down with Kelley's Associate Professor of Accounting Evelyn Patterson, who specializes in auditing and fraud detection, to uncover where and why some organizations make the turn toward corruption and what we can do as leaders to prevent this from happening within our companies. ---- Do you have a question? Looking to get help on a business decision? Know a great guest for our show? Email roipod@iupui.edu so we can help your organization make better business decisions. ---- Ready to take your next step? Check out if a Kelley MBA is right for you: https://bit.ly/35cLVqy

Fraud Eats Strategy
Critiquing Leadership and Living to Tell About It

Fraud Eats Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 28:07


In this episode, we talk about the uncomfortable and sometimes terrifying situation when a compliance officer must critique a member of leadership team and living to tell about it. In recent years, the expression “tone at the top” has been displaced by “conduct at the top” ushering in a new era of leadership accountability and transparency by the DOJ and other enforcement agencies in the U.S. and overseas. As a practical matter, compliance officers must on occasion investigate or critique members of the leadership team when conducting an internal investigation or assessing the ethics and compliance program. Joining me today is Matt Tanzer. For 13 years, Matt held various positions at Tyco including Chief Compliance & Ethics Officer. A position he also held after Tyco was merged into Johnson Controls.  

Market Liberation Front
018 | Family Feud

Market Liberation Front

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2020 49:07


 [Intro: Jamie Foxx]She take my money when I'm in needYeah, she's a triflin' friend indeedOh, she's a gold diggerWay over town that digs on me [Chorus: Kanye West & (Jamie Foxx)](She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head [Verse 1: Kanye West]Cutie the bomb, met her at a beauty salonWith a baby Louis Vuitton under her underarmShe said: "I can tell you rock, I can tell by your charmFar as girls, you got a flockI can tell by your charm and your arm"But I'm lookin' for the one, have you seen her?My psychic told me she'll have a ass like SerenaTrina, Jennifer Lopez, four kidsAnd I gotta take all they bad asses to ShowBiz?Okay, get your kids, but then they got their friendsI pulled up in the Benz, they all got up inWe all went to din' and then I had to payIf you fuckin' with this girl, then you better be paidYou know why? It take too much to touch herFrom what I heard she got a baby by BustaMy best friend said she used to fuck with UsherI don't care what none of y'all say, I still love her[Chorus: Kanye West & (Jamie Foxx)](She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head [Verse 2: Kanye West]Eighteen years, eighteen yearsShe got one of your kids, got you for eighteen yearsI know somebody payin' child support for one of his kidsHis baby mama car and crib is bigger than hisYou will see him on TV any given SundayWin the Super Bowl and drive off in a HyundaiShe was supposed to buy your shorty Tyco with your moneyShe went to the doctor, got lipo with your moneyShe walkin' around lookin' like Michael with your moneyShoulda got that insured, Geico for your moneyIf you ain't no punkHolla, "We want prenup! We want prenup!" (Yeah!)It's somethin' that you need to have‘Cause when she leave yo' ass, she gon' leave with halfEighteen years, eighteen yearsAnd on the 18th birthday, he found out it wasn't his?[Chorus: Kanye West & (Jamie Foxx)](She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(She give me money) Now, I ain't sayin' she a gold digger(When I'm in need) But she ain't messin' with no broke niggas(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head [Verse 3: Kanye West]Now, I ain't sayin' you a gold digger, you got needsYou don't want a dude to smoke, but he can't buy weedYou go out to eat, he can't pay, y'all can't leaveThere's dishes in the back, he gotta roll up his sleevesBut while y'all washin', watch himHe gon' make it to a Benz out of that DatsunHe got that ambition, baby, look at his eyesThis week he moppin' floors, next week it's the friesSo stick by his sideI know there's dudes ballin', and yeah, that's niceAnd they gonna keep callin' and tryin', but you stay right, girlAnd when he get on, he'll leave yo' ass for a white girl [Chorus 2: Kanye West & (Jamie Foxx)](I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head, get down(I gotta leave) Get down girl, go 'head

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Connect - 432 - Albert Meyer of Bastiat Capital

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2020 21:48


In this episode, Hall welcomes Albert Meyer, Founder & Chief Investment Officer at Bastiat Capital. Headquartered in Plano, Texas, and established in 2006, Bastiat Capital is an asset management firm directing a concentrated and conservative large-cap equity portfolio. They apply unparalleled forensic accounting expertise, human insight and rich company-specific research as they seek to outperform the S&P 500 Total Return while mitigating downside risk. Albert is a veteran investment manager and forensic accountant who received global attention for uncovering one of the largest Ponzi schemes in U.S. history, the “Foundation for New Era Philanthropy”. He published the research report on Tyco that ultimately led to the prosecution and imprisonment of Dennis Kozlowski. He has also uncovered noteworthy accounting irregularities at Enron, Lucent and Coca-Cola. His work on Coca-Cola and eBay became the basis of several Harvard Business School case studies. Albert launched his career in corporate accounting with Deloitte & Touche, then dedicated 15 years to teaching accounting in academia. In 1996, he began applying his forensic accounting expertise to investment management on a professional basis, first at Martin Capital Management, and later with David Tice & Associates, and with Clark Hunt (current CEO of the Kansas City Chiefs) and the Hunt family office in Dallas, Texas. In 2002, Albert established an investment research business school named 2nd Opinion Research and in 2005, he received the American Accounting Association’s highest honor, the Accounting Exemplar Award (previously awarded to former SEC commissioner Arthur Levitt), in recognition of his many contributions to the field of accounting. Albert is a Chartered Accountant (the British Commonwealth equivalent of a CPA) and a Certified Public Accountant. He is a regular contributor to national financial media on investing and accounting topics. He and his wife Melenie reside in Plano, Texas near their three sons and their spouses, as well as six grandchildren. Albert shares with Hall what excites him right now in the industry, some of the challenges he sees investors facing in today's economy, and his company's thesis. He suggests some immediate opportunities for investors to pursue and those to avoid. Albert concludes the interview with his very detailed opinion on the benefits of the S&P 500 vs. Social Security. You can visit Bastiat Capital at , and via LinkedIn at .  Albert can be contacted via email at . 

You Can Overcome Anything! Podcast Show
You Can Overcome Anything: Ep 65 - Depression, 2 attempted Murder, 2 a Millionaire – Bryce McKinley

You Can Overcome Anything! Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2020 58:40


Today's Episode Cesar R. Espino brings you a true story of overcoming multiple obstacles in life, with special guest Bryce McKinley.Bryce overcame obstacles of depression, drugs, alcohol, the lost of loss his son and wife, and the attempting of taking his own life, loosing everything to living out of his car to now living a beautiful life.Bryce is the Co-Owner of a Real estate Brokerage, Master Salesman/Master Sales Trainer/Real Estate Investor Specialist.He has been globally recognized as a Top 5 Sales Trainer & Independent Business Consultant. Working with businesses including but not limited to, Fortune 500 Companies such as Ford, Nissan, Tyco, and ADT. He has been selling since he was eight years old, and training Sales Professionals for over 20 years! This has allowed him to become a Master Closer and Negotiator. Most recently, he has taken his abilities into real estate, where his team has had over 7000 homes Bought and/or Sold.As CEO of S.H.A.R.P.E.N., a nonprofit in which they help and serve the less fortunate, they are changing the world one life at a time!SHARPEN Stands for...SelflesslyHelpingAllReadyPersonsEager forNurturingBryce's message is: Love Like You have never been hurt! and live life as if there's always another explanationTo Connect with Bryce go to:www.facebook.com/reiresultscoachwww.facebook.com/leadgenerationfreedomIG: @CoachSharpenTo Connect with CesarRespino go to:

Toy Rewind Podcast
Episode 007: Spy Toys

Toy Rewind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2020 57:01


In honor of our 7th episode, this week we talk about James Bond 007 and Spy Tech by Tyco. All these amazing spy toys to let the kids act like they were secret agents along with some of the best toys from the Bond movies.

BabyFace Assasin
"Home Run Season" Ft. Jack Jeter & Tyco X

BabyFace Assasin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 40:04


LISTEN: This Day In History
September 12th This Day in History

LISTEN: This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2020 3:37


Today in history: Space Shuttle Endeavour blasts off. Tyco executives indicted. Steven Biko dies in police custody. Senator John F. Kennedy marries Jacqueline Lee Bouvier. Emperor Haile Selassie deposed.   See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

Adventure Media & Events Podcasts
Power Kid Podcast: Bruce Canner of Nikko Toys Talks RC and Classic Toys

Adventure Media & Events Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2020 34:55


In this week's episode of the "Power Kid Podcast," host Phil Albritton of Power Kid Design speaks with Bruce Canner, president of sales — North America at Nikko Toys. Canner's long career path includes stops at Remco, Tyco, Fisher-Price, Shelcore, Hit Toy, and Toy State before joining the relaunched Nikko last year. On the show, Canner and Albritton finally put to rest the debate on how to pronounce “Nikko” — the name behind some of the fastest RC cars on the market for the past six decades. Additionally, the episode includes a nostalgic discussion about classic toy commercials, stories from Azrak-Hamway and Mego, the unique challenges and innovations inside the RC market, and how toy inventors can help push the category forward. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/adventuremedia/message

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS
Mark Sanborn | The Intention Imperative | Why Real Leaders Are the People That Help to Improve and Develop Their People

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 27:23


Are you looking to become the best leader that YOU can be? The speaker of choice for McDonald’s, Toyota, FedEX, Tyco, and more joins us to share about why real leaders are the people that help to improve and develop their team.

Fire Sprinkler Podcast
Ft. Lucas Eidenmuller from JCI Discussing the Tyco ESFR-34

Fire Sprinkler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2020 18:36


Fairly in depth conversation regarding the use, design criteria, and over all badassness of the Tyco ESFR-34. An 1 1/4” Threaded outlet allows up to 250GPM to be pumped from a single sprinkler. With a 9 sprinkler design area, narrower aisle widths, and higher storage with no in racks. Is the Tyco ESFR-34 the sprinkler for your storage arrangement? Find out in this episode!

The Deal
Drinks With The Deal: Simpson's Alan Klein

The Deal

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2020 29:44


Simpson's Alan Klein discusses his stint in London in the late 1990s, his work for Microsoft and Tyco and his passion for films and books on the latest episode of the Drink With The Deal podcast.

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network
Decision Making for Real Estate Investors with Gleb Tsipursky - CREPN #252

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2020 44:30


Gleb Tispursky  0:00   But what happened was that they were letting their intuitions lead, letting the gut reactions lead and their gut reactions told them that we can't afford to lose. We can't afford to lose our social status in the eyes of the tribe, in the eyes of our peers, and therefore, we'll make these bad decisions, which will prevent us from losing social status.   Intro  0:20   Welcome to C R E P N Radio for influential commercial real estate professionals who work with investors, buyers and sellers of commercial real estate coast to coast whether you're an investor, broker, lender, property manager, attorney or accountant We are here to learn from the experts.   J Darrin Gross  0:39   Welcome to Commercial Real Estate Pro Networks CREPN Radio, Episode Number 252. Thanks for joining us. My name is J. Darrin Gross. This is the podcast focused on commercial real estate, investment and risk management strategies. Weekly we have conversations with commercial real estate investors and professionals provide their experience and insight to help you grow your real estate portfolio. Let's get into the show. today. My guest is Gleb Tispursky. He is the CEO of Disaster Avoidance Experts. And he's on a mission to protect leaders from dangerous judgment errors, known as cognitive biases, which devastated bottom lines and bring down high flying careers. He's authored hundreds of articles and written multiple best selling books, including Never Go with Your Gut, The Truth Seekers Handbook and his newest book, Blind Spots Between Us. He received his PhD in History of Behavioral Science at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. And in just a minute we're going to speak with Gleb about decision making for your business. But first a quick reminder. If you like the show, CREPN Radio Please let us know. You can like, share and subscribe. Also, if you'd like to leave a comment, we would love to hear from our listeners. And if you would also like to see how handsome our guests are, be sure to check out our YouTube channel. And you can find that at commercial real estate pro network on the YouTube. With that, I want to welcome my guest Gleb Welcome to CREPN Radio.   Gleb Tispursky  2:29   Thank you there. It's a pleasure to be here.   J Darrin Gross  2:32   I'm delighted that you were able to join us today. And looking forward to our our talk this afternoon. Before we get started, if you could take just a minute and share with the listeners a little little more about your background.   Gleb Tispursky  2:48   Sure. So I've always been fascinated with decision making ever since I was a kid because the typical way that we are taught to do decision making. The way you've probably heard a lot is to go with our gut, follow into Question. That's the most typical advice about decision making. everyone hears that. Well, my parents were very much gut oriented decision makers. So they felt something was right. Their intuition told them it was right. And they did it. Unfortunately, often their intuition opposed each other's intuition. So for example, my mom liked to buy nice clothing, and my dad was kind of a cheapskate. So she'd go out and she'd buy a $50 sweater, and she'd come home and he'd yell at her say that, you know, sweater shouldn't cost anything more than $20 and stuff like that. And then they'd be off and fighting and so on. And already as a kid, I said, that was kind of dumb. It wasn't really helpful. The question wasn't resolved, and they still kept fighting and fighting and fighting wasn't good for their relationship. So and it impacted me as a kid, obviously, to hear my mom and dad yell at each other. But the worst time was this one time when my dad so my dad was a real estate agent, and he had a variable salary based on commissions. And there was a period of about six months where he made a lot of money, but he hid it from my mom. So he made Available money probably didn't want her to spend on sweaters. And so she bought an apartment elsewhere and leased it out to some folks. And about a couple of years, my mom found out about it. And she was so mad. She was so pissed there was a huge big blowout fight actually end up separating for a while. And so I lived with my mom and didn't see my dad much in that area. They eventually reconciled but you could never really trust them again. So I saw that my parents make terrible decisions about financial matters. And so that really impelled me to try to figure out why do we make such bad decisions? Why does nobody see set us down? Why did nobody sit me down? And tell me now Hey, kiddo, here's how you make decisions that my parents didn't do that. I wasn't taught how to make good decisions in school, or even college. Once I got to college, nobody taught me to make good decisions. They taught me math. They taught me geography but not decision making. Even though decision making is so fundamentally important. Everything, everything, everything we do in our lives, from business, to personal lives to relationships. I mean, Let's not even talk about relationships. I mean, there's a reason there's a 40% divorce rate in this country. So, I decided to study decision making, how we make decisions badly and how we can screw up our decisions and how we can fix the screwed up decision making that we tend to make. So I studied this topic and I started as I started studying this topic, people became interested in what I had to say. So I became a trainer, consultant and coach, which I've been doing for about 20 years and working in this field. At the same time, once I exhausted the very slim pickings that were on how to make good decisions and popular media, I went decided I need to actually study this formally. So I went in Taka Jima, and that's where I got my PhD in history of behavioral science, looking at the cognitive neuroscience and behavioral economics of decision making. So cognitive neuroscientists and behavioral economists, they spent about 15 years in academia, including seven years, Ohio State as a professor teaching about this stuff and researching it. And so that's where my the book never goes. Got how pioneering leaders make the best decisions and avoid business disasters came about combination of by consultant coaching experience, plus the actual cognitive neuroscience and behavioral economics of decision making. So that's what my background is like. And of course, all my other books also touch on various things. The blind spots between us talks about professional personal relationships, and the true secrets handbook talks about decision making in personal life.   J Darrin Gross  6:26   Got it.  That's fascinating life story from a standpoint of being a something that affected you in your childhood, how it made such a big impression and kind of a drove your, your career that's, that's really cool because I think so many times, people, especially if there's any kind of pain involved, but you hear about more people trying to avoid something or, or and I guess in a way, maybe that's it, that's what you're trying to do is avoid the pain of your childhood by understanding it better.   Gleb Tispursky  6:57   That not so much the pain of my child output, but I really care about people. I've always been someone who care who has a value side of utilitarianism, meaning wanting the most good for the most number. You know, it always hurt me to see people suffer. So the fact that so many people suffer, I mean, I suffered as a kid. And you know, I learned a good decision making by myself, but it didn't have to teach to others. The reason I got interested in teaching about it to others in popularizing it and helping leaders make better decisions was that this professionals and so make better decisions because I see all the suffering that comes from it. I mean, think about, let's say, the fiscal, you know, I grew up during the.com, boom and bust when in 1999, I was 18. When all the tech leaders were partying like it's 1999. And then just a couple of years later, there was the.com bust, when the people who are the heroes of the Wall Street Journal suddenly became zeroes. And so many people lost their life savings. So many people. It was a tragedy. I mean, I knew people who really suffered in that period. And so just seeing that was was terrible. For me to just to go through that, and even worse for the bad malicious decisions taken by the leaders of Enron, WorldCom and Tyco to hide their losses of these companies using fraudulent accounting methods. And so seeing the kind of bad decision making terrible decision making by these leaders really made me realize how important business leaders are to the lives of everyone around them. So that made me really passionate and fascinated with how I can make a difference by popularizing good decision making for everyone and especially for business leaders.   J Darrin Gross  8:34   Well, it's interesting, you know, when you think about some of the examples you cited there, I'm kind of curious. Do you have any kind of an insight or a Have you have you come up with a reason for any of those that you cited like the Enron and these others that the reason for the bad decisions?   Gleb Tispursky  8:58   Yes. So with Enron Main bad decision making came from actually what drives us to make decisions. So we talk about our gut, we talk about our intuition. But what is that? Well, it's about our emotions, our feelings. And what the research and decision making shows is that our feelings, our emotions, our intuitions, drive about 80 to 90% of our decisions, so when we just go ahead and let them drive our decisions. Now, unfortunately, our feelings our intuitions, they're not adapted for the other environment. They're adapted for the savanna environment, when we were living in small tribes of 15 people to 150 people when they were hunters, foragers and gatherers. And there are lots of things about the savanna environment, the tribal environment, that are not a good fit for the modern environment, but we're still have the instincts of going forward and making the decisions as though we're in the tribal span. So for example, for survival and thriving in the tribe, it was very important for us to climb the tribal hierarchy. We are the descendants of those who climb the tribal hierarchy and then fry them survived and spread their genes because the people at the top of the tribal hierarchy were the ones most capable of spreading their genes. There is a reason about 5% of us on the earth are descended from the great conqueror gang discount according to extend to recent research. So, there's a reason for that. So we are very strongly pushed to try to climb the social hierarchy to stay at the top of the tribal hierarchy. And the leaders of Enron, WorldCom and Tyco, you know, the burning embers of the world and so on. What we now know about them is that what drove them to make their terrible decisions to hide their losses was fear of failure, fear of being seen as losing social status among their peers. Now, the decision to use fraudulent accounting didn't really delay the reckoning by more than a year or two. And what they got a year more of bonuses for an exchange for what 1015 years of prison. And how much money did they lose while they were in prison compared to what they could have gained. It was terrible decision making on their part, because look at how much they lost. And it's not like they want they actually really seriously lost for using fraudulent accounting methods. But what happened was that they were letting their intuitions lead, letting the gut reactions lead and their gut reactions told them that we can't afford to lose, we can't afford to lose our social status in the eyes of the tribe, in the eyes of our peers, and therefore we'll make these bad decisions, which will prevent us from losing social status. So the fear of failure that drove them is actually when I do consulting and coaching for business leaders. I see it very often I see the fear of failure, the fear of loss, especially the fear of losing social status, you know, the top level when you have plenty of money. What really drives people a lot is not wanting to be seen as a failure or wanting to be seen as a success, and they often make really bad to say Because of that,   J Darrin Gross  12:01   So how can you guard against making decisions based on the fear of failure?   Gleb Tispursky  12:09   What you want to do is distance yourself from this social status seeking recognize that, hey, social status seeking is just an inherent part of what we do as human beings. It's very natural, it's very intuitive, in the same way, that it's very intuitive for us when we come across a source of sugar, you know, to eat as much as possible because in the savanna environment, you know, think about what happened if you came across some grapes or some bananas or some apples, it was very important for you to eat as much as possible in order to survive and thrive. We are the descendants of those who are able to do that, because the other people didn't the other answers the other people who are not ancestors because they died. So we are the descendants of those who were able to do it. Now when we come across a box of Krispy Kreme dozen donuts. We want to eat the whole dozen donuts. That's the intuitive thing. That's in natural thing for us to do that because we're driven to have all that sugar. Now you hopefully have learned over time and develop the mental habit that it's important to not eat a dozen donuts, you know, you want maybe one doughnut, you know two donuts, but you got to stop at the third donut. Don't eat more than more than two don'ts. Not everyone learned that which is why we have the obesity epidemic in this country. But still, hopefully you understand that that's a bad idea. Even though you might end up doing it. Sometimes we have low willpower and and not that I ever did it. So you want to make you want to understand that this is a bad mental tendency that comes around bad reactions. And you have learned to in to restrain yourself from eating all the sugar that you can. In the same way. You need to learn to recognize what are all the dangerous judgment errors called cognitive biases that our brain pushes us to make that our gut reactions, our intuitions when we just tell people to go with their gut pushes on To make, because of how our brain is wired, you need to learn about all of them. And you need to restrain yourself from falling into. And there are specific techniques for doing so. And the social status seeking is just one of those you need to learn to recognize when you are falling into that social status seeking mode, when you're afraid of losing steps in the eyes of those around you, and when that's driving you to make some terrible decisions that will hurt you and others going forward.   J Darrin Gross  14:32   So, you know, it's funny, you bring up the social status seeking mode, which makes me think of all of the social media kind of stuff where you know, most of it's like a highlight reel about everybody winning and, and, you know, I know there's been numerous studies done about just the dopa mean that you know, when you see the reactions to your post or whatever the that gives you a certain pleasure. So, If if that is, and I don't say that's that that's the the tell. But But if the from a decision maker standpoint, you know that you mentioned, you want to try and discipline yourself for not seeking that or be be wary of that fear of failure that that need for social status. So but but if you're somebody that's that's looking at potentially investing with somebody, are there ways that you can identify somebody that potentially may have this kind of fear of failure? You know, that you should be wary of I mean, if you were working, working with or investing in Enron at the time, was there anything that you could have identified or were, you know, things that you could have done to prevent or so you could have gotten out ahead of the crash.   Gleb Tispursky  15:56   So what we know what we know we have some research So I'm going to speak up from what the research shows. We know that leaders, CEOs, whether you know, leaders or financial firms, or other sorts of firms, when you see them appearing often in the media, that is a strong sign that they are overconfident, and that they are displaying social status in a way that's going beyond where they should be. So we know that, for example, we know that leaders who appear, the more often the CEO appears in the media, the more often the more they tend to overpay for a company that they buy. So if you're thinking about like a merger and acquisition, if the leader of a company that's about to do a merger and acquisition appears often in the media, there this is likely to be one of those many, many m&a is that fail. Now, m&a is failed rate of very high rate, they fail at a rate of about 80%. So about 80% of all mergers and acquisitions fail to create value, they destroy value, and the more A leader tends to appear in the media, the more of a failure will be, the less likely it will be to be a success and the more of a negative impact it will have. And there's many other so leaders who tend to appear more often the media who have if you look at the sentiment analysis of the kind of language that they use, which you as a potential investor can certainly look at the language and see if the love language is fluffy if the language is excessive, if the language is hypee, if it's hyping it up, then you're likely to see that later, the company will be worth less than it should have been worth compared to other companies where the leaders don't use the sort of hyped up language. So there is definitely tells that you that we know very clear tells based on the research in cognitive neuroscience that you can use to predict which companies are going to have leaders who make bad decisions, because of their excessive overconfidence, excessive over thing. So these are things that you want to really be careful about and watch out for. Now, leaders who tend to be in the background, those leaders are not don't get nearly as much credit as they actually should. So if you look at the kind of leaders who have the company result in the highest profits, it's very often leaders who are less grandiloquent who speak less, and who actually do more. And those are the leaders. The funny thing is those are not the companies that get the initial investment. They don't get the not kind of the Elon Musk Tesla going through the roof, but they are the companies that get the most profit, so they get the most revenue per share. And those are the companies that value bets that you want to be confident will actually earn you the most money. So that is, those are something those are just some of the many things that I talked about in my book. Never go with your gut. How pioneering leaders make the best decisions and avoid business ancestors. If you want to make smart financial decisions.   J Darrin Gross  19:01   And I appreciate you kind of going through that the majority of the audience is either real estate investor or looking to invest in real estate. And, you know, a lot of the deals that they're I mean, they're constantly making decisions, whether it be on a market or a, you know, a property underwriting a property, maybe be the team that they select property manager. On and on it goes. And, you know, it's funny because you you mentioned this and I think that there's a natural awareness sometimes of of what's presented or, or just the need to, you know, you have to do your homework, whether it be if you're dealing direct with the seller, or if you're looking to invest in a syndication or whatever, you've got to, you know, kind of lift the hood and and, you know, question The information and make sure you get an answer on that. Based on that, I'm just kind of curious if Is there a, like a strategy that you would recommend or, you know, suggest that people like real estate investors consider when investing?   Gleb Tispursky  20:21   Yes. So the book talks about strategies that are relevant, very relevant for investors. And for anyone else looking to make a good business decision. Of course, people who are making a decision in business about which vendor to select, and which whether they want to which clients to work with the client decide making a decision on whether to buy something, you have to make the same sort of decision as an investor. And I described two methods in the book which are fundamentally valuable in addressing a lot of cognitive biases at once. One for casual decisions, meaning casual decisions, which you don't want to screw up but you don't want to maximize where you want to get a satisfactory Good enough decision. And this is a method that takes only a couple of minutes. And it is something that you want to make sure you use multiple times throughout the day for any sort of moderately important decision that you don't want to scrub. There's also long and this is involves five questions. There's also longer eight step method that you want to use for more major serious decisions, when you're actually deciding on whether to take the big deal or not. Whether you're deciding to enter into a partnership or not something that really makes a major impact on your bottom line, and where you want to get the perfect answer or as perfect as possible, rather than a good offense. So but for the good offense. Let's talk about the five questions you want to ask about anything that you don't want to screw up. Let's say you're thinking about writing an email to a potential business partner, and you want to work out a nuanced issue as part of the email. So that's an email the serious email, you don't want to scroll down but it's not going to make her very pure bottom line. First question, you want to ask about five questions. What important information didn't I get fully consider? So what evidence didn't you take into account? Let's say you want to influence your business partner to take a certain decision? Now, have you considered all the reasons why they may not take that decision? That's often evidence that we don't take into account. So we just write the email hoping they'll ignore all the evidence, all the information that they that you would not want them to consider. However, the email would likely be much stronger if you think about their perspective. And if you take it into account and addressing in advance of their concerns, so that's information that you haven't considered now if you do consider it, you could revise your email to take those issues and count and be much better able to influence your business partner to make the decision that you want them to make. So that's the first question and that's an example of high implied second. What dangerous judgment errors Haven't I addressed in this situation? So What cognitive biases might be playing a role that you haven't considered? There are very many cognitive biases. My book talks about the 30 most dangerous ones for investing for deal making, for business leadership for all sorts of things. So you want to take a look at the 30 most dangerous ones, take a look at my book, never go with your gut. And if you want to look at the ones for the relationships, in particular, look at the blind spots between us but for business decision making, never go with your gut. Next one, what what a trusted objective advisor telling me to do so think about someone who's a trusted objective advisor to you, what would they tell you to do? What would derron tell you to do? What would that little angel on your shoulder tells you to do? We got about 50% of this benefit by just asking the question taking out ourselves outside of ourselves. So what would you tell a friend to do about this email in an objective situation, and you get the other 50% of the benefit by actually asking a trusted objective advisor. So call this person or for your millennial text this person. Next, how have I addressed All the ways this decision could fail. So think about the email, let's say your business partner happens to be in a bad mood when they read the email, and they misinterpreted and they get upset. And then whatever you want to see happen doesn't happen. How can you address that events? Well, perhaps read it, read the email, so your business partner receives it when they're in a bad mood, and then address all the ambiguities and uncertainties and lack of clarity in that email. And that will help you address all the sorts of the problems that would happen if the business partners about finally, what would cause you to change your mind about this decision. So what would cause you to reevaluate your choice? For example, with an email, you could say, hey, if I don't get an answer from my business partner, within a week, I will give this person a call. And now once you make this decision, you can just send the email and you can let it go knowing you have a revision point in a week, whereas otherwise it'd be kind of thinking about it all the way. In your mind, you know what? Why is your business partner not responding? Should you send another email should you call whereas right now if you make a decision in advance that if if then if you don't hear from that person in seven days in a week, you will give a call, you just let it go. And you got just go forward. So that those five questions are very effective for addressing a whole range of bad decisions that we tend to make on everyday level, minimizing risks. And this again, is for minimizing risks, not for maximizing rewards, for minimizing risks for anything, but you don't want to screw up.   J Darrin Gross  25:35   So I got a question. If you apply that five step process, how many emails do you write up that you'd like not to send?   Gleb Tispursky  25:47   Yes, that will definitely happen. You'll realize that, you know, maybe that's not the best, the best email for you to spend. So yes, I   J Darrin Gross  25:55   I was going to say, I know I have unnecessary thought of him in those, the one through five there, but I can tell you numerous times throughout the day, I'll start an email or a text or something. And then I realized, you know, what's the point of this kind of thing? It's not gonna, you know, is there going to be any benefit from this? Now, that's I appreciate you taking us through that. And especially I think just the asking these personally, as I've listened that, you know, what, what would a trusted advisor tell me to do? You know, because I think that's that right there is, is making me think outside of just the one to one. Now, if there's any kind of emotion involved in the, in the, you know, the reaction, if it's a reaction especially, I think there's, there's, there's power in waiting, you know, as opposed to reacting like that. So I appreciate you taking us through that. I got I got a question for you. You referred to, a couple of times through, you know, the information about how This is like a historical way we've been been wired, I want to say, No words.   Gleb Tispursky  27:08   Our brains are wired. Yeah. But   J Darrin Gross  27:11   is that is that? Do you find that that's at a cellular level? Or is that more of like, your grandparents did it that way your parents saw it. And it's just kind of a transfer of behavior based on the experience,   Gleb Tispursky  27:27   isn't it? It is at the cellular level, meaning biological meaning genetic in this case. So if you look at babies, you can see that these traits already exhibited in babies, you will can see that babies are things do things like loss aversion, they exhibit things like tribalism. So I talked a little bit about tribalism, so tribalism, one of them is status seeking one aspect of tribalism status seeking another aspect of tribalism is that it was very important for us in the Savannah environment, to be very strongly attracted to people who are like us meaningful like and trust the people who seem to be like us who have our values, who seem to like the things that we like, you know, like the same flavor is right. And to not like people who don't seem like us who seem different from us. So that was very important that environment because if we're going to be kicked out of our small little tribe who would die, and if our tribe fell apart, because we weren't supportive enough of our tribe, we would also die. So we're the descendants of those people who didn't die, because they were very tribal. And we they opposed attacking tribal members, hostile tribes, which wanted to claim their territory. So that's why I don't like other people who aren't like you. So you can see already those sorts of things, those examples. So again, babies were babies, if you show a baby, someone who likes the same thing that they do, and the baby will like that person more will be more attracted to that person. So these are not things that the babies haven't learned about these things yet. They are ingrained in us from when we're actually pretty, that our genetic innocence things. So they're instinctive and that is why they're very dangerous because they're instinctive, but not something we learned from my parents. They're just part of who we are. They're part of our genes, and they are ingrained behaviors. And that's the danger of following these ingrained behaviors that they're not a good fit for the modern world.   J Darrin Gross  29:18   No, it's good. Hey, I want to ask you a little bit about the you mentioned it, this fear of loss, or loss aversion. Can you speak to that and just kind of expand on that a little bit for us?   Gleb Tispursky  29:37   Sure. So here's the really interesting study that was done by a large bank, I won't name it looked at its best investors, people who had it's a, it's accounts for the best people which grew the highest and found that there were two categories of investors that were the best investors, one people who forgot about their accounts and two people who died   J Darrin Gross  30:01   Really?    Gleb Tispursky  30:02   Yes,    J Darrin Gross  30:03   You got it, you got a chance or if you'd if you die, you could be one of the best investors.   Gleb Tispursky  30:07   There you go. Exactly. So because there are so many people who on average tend to, on average, investors tend to buy high and sell low. And that comes from various dangerous judgment errors. One of the biggest cognitive biases that causes this is called loss aversion. So loss aversion is our tendency to want to avoid losses, even at the expense of getting much higher gains. So this is it's a really fascinating phenomenon. If you there's been studies done showing that asking someone hey, here's a coin flip experiment. I'll give you $40 right now, and in exchange, not exchange so you have the $40. Now, will you give me that $40 for a flip of a coin where if you get heads, you get hundred dollars or if it's tails, you get zero. Now, if you get that experiment to people, you'll see that about 80 to 90% of the people choose to keep the $40. They don't want to go to the coin flip. But the coin flip, the equivalent value of the coin flip is $50. It's 50% of 100. So think about what happens with a coin flip. If you do a coin, flip 100 times 1000 times do it 100,000 times 100,000 times, that's a difference of 40 million versus a 4 million versus 5 million. That's the difference between the $40 equivalent and the $50 equivalent, but we are very much so if you if I say that when I say that to people, they say well, you didn't tell me about the repeating scenario. You told me just you know this one time scenario. If I thought about it differently, if you told me it was a repeating scenario, well, our gut reaction tends to see anything that we do as a one time thing. It doesn't see the broader context of the story. veterans that we tend to make, it doesn't go toward that high gain the 50% chance of $50 of the 50% chance of $100 instead of the $40, I can keep right now. So this is one of the biggest problems that we tend to go for, we tend to want the bird in the hand instead of the two in the bush, even when we have a pretty strongly guaranteed chance of getting the two in the bush. And because in the savanna environment, think about it in the savanna environment. We were in a very precarious environment where it just we didn't have banks, it didn't make sense for us to gather resources. It's not like we know we, if you kill the mammoth, you can put all the food in the fridge, right? You can't store up your resources. So in the savanna environment, it made a lot of sense for us to go for the immediate short term gains and to ignore the larger potential gains from investing these resources and to avoid losses because in the picture So in environment, if we, for if we risked our resources, the $40 for the pretty sizable chance of winning $100, then maybe there would be a drought or something like that, and we would die. So that sort of precarious environment, it makes sense to go to avoid losses to make sure to preserve as many short term resources as possible. In the modern environment, it really doesn't. We have banks were pretty well protected from immediate short term losses. And it's so if you make a short term loss of $40, not a big deal, you will still win out over all over a million flips, coin flips and give the $50 million equivalent. However, that's not what our gut tells us. So we tend to when we are faced with the short term loss when we see stocks falling, we tend to immediately want to sell them, even though it might not be the right time to sell. And when we see stocks as going high. We want we experienced FOMO fear of missing out, and we tend to want to buy them, even though it may not be the best time to buy even though they might have peaked. So these are times when we are falling into that loss aversion, we want to avoid the loss of not getting into a good thing. And we want to avoid the loss of   more pain from stocks going down. And we make bad decisions. And of course, this applies to not only stocks, this applies to commercial real estate deals, this applies to all sorts of deals, this applies to our general way of thinking and being in the world. So you need to be very careful and know that, hey, this is a tendency in which we human beings fall into a need to be constantly aware of this and scanning your environment for this tendency, just like you're scared of scanning your environment for the and making sure to not eat a dozen donuts because you know, it's very easy for us to eat a dozen donuts if we're not full. If we're not paying attention to it. It's very easy for us to you know, just come home and play down on the couch and watch Netflix, instead of going out to the gym, which, you know, ideally, you want to do about 30 minutes of exercise a day. But in the savanna environment, you want to preserve all the resources, all the calories that you could and not do exercises. So we're not we are wired to serve at home and watch Netflix all day, you know, the equivalent of sitting in the cab and by the campfire and you know, doing that all day. So this is a problem for us. And we want to make sure to be watching out for all of these sorts of problems, cognitive biases, loss aversion, you know, and all of these status seeking and so on. And so that's loss aversion is one of the biggest ones that investors tend to fall into that causes them a lot of pain like this big bank discovered   J Darrin Gross  35:46   No, it's it's interesting you know, when you think about it based on the the two best investors, the those who forgot about the account or those that died. It sounds like sometimes not making a decision is one The best decisions that you can make.   Gleb Tispursky  36:03   And that's why I was giving the example of when stocks are going up, that may not be the best time to buy these stocks. And when stocks are going down, that may not be the best time to sell these stocks. And that's one of the just one of many reasons why people who do that are often the ones who lose.   J Darrin Gross  36:21   Well, I think it also, especially in real estate, I know I bought at the high and at the low end. But over time, if you if you have enough time, it all works out. It's a matter of you. I think if if maybe the first decision would be can I afford to lose this money? Or can I afford to not worry about it? or How much time do I have? That kind of thing? Because if you start from that standpoint and understand you may need a longer horizon to get to your goal, but you will make your goal maybe just not on such a short horizon and I think right Now especially where we're at, with the cycle of the market. When, when people look at and realize just how low the market was, you know, and the crash does and how far up it's come. There's this natural tendency to think and I think it kind of plays on what we've been talking about here. Is this kind of the fear of the next crash? And then in the news, recently the Coronavirus and you know, other things that suggest you know, there's there's like the antenna or up looking for looking for the next shoe to drop as opposed to, like you're saying the long run is things you know, you flip the coin enough times, or if you buy and stay in enough deals. It sounds like to me that that you know, you're probably gonna be alright, it's more a matter that if you're trying to time it, kind of thing that you might not. He might know when. So,   Gleb Tispursky  37:57   Yes, so you want to make sure that's why valid Investing is a good pretty good bet. You want to make sure if the deal makes sense over time, rather than trying to time the market and time trying to time the market, whether it's the real estate market, or the stock market is usually not going to win out, especially because you're competing against others who are trying to time the market. And when you're competing against the big firms that are trying to time the market, they're often going to be better at timing the market than you are. And so you can actually get the best chance for smaller investors, according to research on this topic is to try to do value investing, whether in the real estate or elsewhere, so focusing on the fundamentals, rather than trying to time the market.   J Darrin Gross  38:42   Got it? Gleb, if we could, I'd like to shift gears here for a second. As I mentioned to you before, we started recording by dam and insurance broker. And as such, we we try and work with our clients to manage risk and There's a couple of different strategies we consider when when trying to manage risk. The first is we ask, can we avoid the risk? If that's not an option, we look and ask, can we minimize the risk? And that's not an option, then we look in and ask, can we transfer the risk? And that's what an insurance policy is, is a risk risk Transfer Tool? and, as such, I have been asking my guests, if they can identify what they consider to be the biggest risk. And just for clarity, I'm not necessarily looking for an insurance related answer. You know, I think some people they think because I have insurance. So that's, that's what I'm looking for. But it's not because I realized that risk is, you know, far reaching. In fact, everything we've been talking about here is kind of managing risk from the standpoint of decision making. But if you're willing, I'd like to ask you Gleb Tispersky. What is the BIGGEST RISK?   Gleb Tispursky  0:06   So what is the biggest risk for me? You're asking?    J Darrin Gross  0:09   Yeah, you are however you you know, you can identify you personally. Or if you see investors or how you see people making decisions or however you want to, however you want to frame the question.    Gleb Tispursky  0:21   So for me, and for me, and for many other people who are like me, the biggest risk, I would say is coal is a cognitive bias called the optimism bias. So I tend to be very optimistically biased. What does that mean? It's one of the cognitive biases where people tend to see the future as always bright. As always great. As you know, the grass is greener on the other side of the hill, everything is going to be wonderful, tend to be risk blind and tend to be have exaggerated expectations. So I tend to systematically underestimate the risks for my future for myself, and this is a huge problem. I've run into many, many mistakes and many problems.   That I wouldn't have to run into if I was not risk intuitively risk blind if I was not just focusing on the opportunities instead of the frets. So I've had to really work on myself and train myself and how to get some outside advisors and help to who are pessimistically oriented to run my ideas by because I just don't see the inherent flaws in them, which are many, you know, the kind of first was 28 years before breakfast, and thinks they're all brilliant. Now, to my bitter experience, I've learned they're not, but this is something I know I have to deal with. And this is something that I've learned to mitigate by both calibrating myself better and knowing that I tend to be way too optimistic, and getting outside help from people who are pessimistic who I trust, who I can run ideas by, and who can tell me that hey, you know, these are 20 have baked potatoes and you know, 17 of them don't make sense but maybe these three you could work on and you know, finish baking them into fully baked potatoes.   J Darrin Gross  1:55   That's great. I love you explaning what you were talking about what's just the five questions there is kind of bouncing your ideas off of somebody else there. That's a lot of power now. So, all right, so Gleb before we wrap up, where can listeners go if they would like to learn more or connect with you?    Gleb Tispursky  2:17   Well, my books are available in bookstores everywhere. They're published by great traditional publishers and never go there got this published by courier press, the blind spots between us as published by new Harbinger. The truth seekers handbook is published by intentional insights. So they're available in physical bookstores everywhere. You can check them out in Barnes and Noble indie bookstores, university bookstores and whatnot. And of course, online on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and elsewhere. My information is going to be on disaster avoidance experts.com. And again, disaster avoidance experts.com. There's going to be blogs, podcasts, video casts, guides, decision maids, manuals, services and consulting coaching and speaking and training and so on. You want to especially Make sure to go to disaster avoidance experts.com forward slash subscribe. There's a free eight video based course on making good decisions. So that includes as the first step of the course on assessment on the 30 most dangerous judgment errors in professional decision making, whether business investing and so on. Again, it's disaster avoidance experts.com forward slash subscribe, and I'm very active on LinkedIn. So if you have any questions about anything you've heard, connect with me there and ask me any questions. Doctor gloves support ski, GLEB TSIPERSKY.   J Darrin Gross  3:35   Got it. For our listeners, I'll have that listed in the show notes. So if you're driving and unable to right, find that there.  Gleb, I want to say thanks again for taking the time to talk. I've enjoyed it, and learned a lot. And I hope we can do it again soon.   Gleb Tispursky  3:54   It was a pleasure. Thank you so much for inviting me.   J Darrin Gross  3:58   All right, for our listeners. If you like this episode Don't forget to like, share and subscribe. Remember, the more you know, the more you grow. That's all we've got this week. Until next time, thanks for listening to commercial real estate pro networks. CREPN Radio

Risktory: The Story of Risk
Whatever Happened to... Tyco

Risktory: The Story of Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 19:11


When you think of the major corporate collapses of the early 2000s. The collapses that devastated thousands. The collapses that changed corporate America forever. The collapses that resulted in Sarbanes-Oxley.When you think of those collapses, you think WorldCom, Enron… and Tyco.Coming up on this week’s episode of the Risktory Podcast, I look at what was – in my opinion – the most fascinating and complex of all the collapses of the early 2000s in Tyco.The Risktory Podcast is created, written, produced and hosted by Jacinthe A Galpin. Soundtrack (sourced from www.freemusicarchive.org)Alan Spiljak – CloudsAlan Spiljak – ForgottenAlan Spiljak – Light blueAlan Spiljak – Empty daysAlan Spiljak – Stars aboveAlan Spiljak – Not the endAlan Spiljak – SunAlan Spiljak – Flying awayAlan Spiljak – TimeAlan Spiljak – Fantasy in my mind Bibliographyhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyco_Internationalhttps://bankruptcy.uslegal.com/profilesfamousbankruptcies/tyco-international-ltd/https://money.howstuffworks.com/cooking-books10.htmhttp://panmore.com/tyco-corporate-scandal-2002-case-analysishttps://hbr.org/2003/12/how-were-fixing-up-tycohttps://ethicsunwrapped.utexas.edu/case-study/dennis-kozlowski-living-largehttps://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2013/12/09/former-tyco-ceo-dennis-kozlowski-was-one-of-the-great-all-time-value-creators/#7ca8db2e2fcahttps://hbr.org/2014/01/dennis-kozlowski-was-not-a-thiefEquipment I use*RODE NT USB Bundle Pack (mic, tripod and boom arm included) - https://amzn.to/37OZI6T *Adobe Audition - https://amzn.to/2OjXchn * Disclosure: These links are Amazon.com affiliate links. If you use them to make a purchase, the Risktory Podcast will earn a commission. Keep in mind that we link these companies and their products because of their quality and relevance to this week’s episode, and not because of the commission we receive from your purchases. The decision is yours, and whether or not you decide to buy something is completely up to you. Thank you for your ongoing support of the Risktory Podcast.

Risktory: The Story of Risk
Whatever Happened to... Tyco

Risktory: The Story of Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 19:11


When you think of the major corporate collapses of the early 2000s. The collapses that devastated thousands. The collapses that changed corporate America forever. The collapses that resulted in Sarbanes-Oxley.When you think of those collapses, you think WorldCom, Enron… and Tyco.Coming up on this week’s episode of the Risktory Podcast, I look at what was – in my opinion – the most fascinating and complex of all the collapses of the early 2000s in Tyco.The Risktory Podcast is created, written, produced and hosted by Jacinthe A Galpin. Soundtrack (sourced from www.freemusicarchive.org)Alan Spiljak – CloudsAlan Spiljak – ForgottenAlan Spiljak – Light blueAlan Spiljak – Empty daysAlan Spiljak – Stars aboveAlan Spiljak – Not the endAlan Spiljak – SunAlan Spiljak – Flying awayAlan Spiljak – TimeAlan Spiljak – Fantasy in my mind Bibliographyhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyco_Internationalhttps://bankruptcy.uslegal.com/profilesfamousbankruptcies/tyco-international-ltd/https://money.howstuffworks.com/cooking-books10.htmhttp://panmore.com/tyco-corporate-scandal-2002-case-analysishttps://hbr.org/2003/12/how-were-fixing-up-tycohttps://ethicsunwrapped.utexas.edu/case-study/dennis-kozlowski-living-largehttps://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2013/12/09/former-tyco-ceo-dennis-kozlowski-was-one-of-the-great-all-time-value-creators/#7ca8db2e2fcahttps://hbr.org/2014/01/dennis-kozlowski-was-not-a-thiefEquipment I use*RODE NT USB Bundle Pack (mic, tripod and boom arm included) - https://amzn.to/37OZI6T *Adobe Audition - https://amzn.to/2OjXchn * Disclosure: These links are Amazon.com affiliate links. If you use them to make a purchase, the Risktory Podcast will earn a commission. Keep in mind that we link these companies and their products because of their quality and relevance to this week’s episode, and not because of the commission we receive from your purchases. The decision is yours, and whether or not you decide to buy something is completely up to you. Thank you for your ongoing support of the Risktory Podcast.

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast
TSR Speed Shop RC podcast "We all just want to Race"

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2020 170:05


TSR podcast Episode 116 “We all Just Want to Race” Hosts: Tim Smith and Matt Howsen   Show introduction and welcome.   Tim Notes: My Poop Story Depression and isolation The laptop finally died and after ten plus years 115 shows, countless live feeds and every dyno and data log call ran through that laptop and now its gone, But we have a new player. NPRC class was never intended to be a cheap class and honestly what RC class is cheap? None, so please get that out of your head this hobby has never been cheap unless you buy a Tyco and drive it in your living room News items   RC Word Of the Week (brought to you by RC Driver) Foam Inserts These inserts are used inside tires to help them retain their shape. Different densities are available for use on different track surfaces.   Main Topic: Got a new Tekin Gen4 3.5, now what? So I did a live feed last weekend, how did you like it? Covering the Arrow car. The Arrow car build, servo, esc, motor fun Arrow car body? What should we use? Upset people and the arrow car, so why is it not legal? So many examples of this already out there but all of a sudden something comes out and you cant or don’t want to buy it and that makes it illegal? Raw Speed Tires, thanks for calling Jason Texas needs to learn they started nothing and are only poor copies. I have had enough of the pissy attitude that some how that group did anything more then copy what others have done the only difference is their incessant need to monetize every inch of it to form some retirement.. Featured Item of the week Raw Speed Drag tires, clay, soft, super soft and long wear soft. Thank you to MaxAmps, MKS Servo, Tekin racing, Graupner USA, CowRC, All you awesome fans, We love you all!

Fire Sprinkler Podcast
Ft. Gary Koellhoffer from JCI discussing New Corrosion Solutions from Tyco

Fire Sprinkler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 24:28


Talking with Gary Koellhoffer discussing the new Nitrogen Generators available from Tyco. We discuss the various parts of the product, where to use them, and the benefits of using nitrogen in your sprinkler systems.#firesprinklerpodcast

DemandGen Radio
#162 What it Takes to be an Agent of Change ft. Linda Haury

DemandGen Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2020 46:19


Linda Haury was responsible for leading the major marketing transformation that took place at Tyco. In this episode, she talks about how she was able to bring the company into the digital world, turning marketing into a data-driven department, integrating and deploying new systems, and aligning marketing with sales. Linda shares how the need for digital transformation became apparent, how she was able to prove ROI to Tyco’s CEO, and why she decided to enlist DemandGen for some additional support.

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
Innovating at Scale with Johnson Controls Chief Digital and Customer Officer

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2020 26:24


448: Johnson Controls CCO/CDO Mike Ellis discusses his experience joining the company after the recent merger with Tyco, the digital agenda that drives innovation across Johnson Controls’ multiple businesses, and his role as Chief Customer and Digital Officer. We also discuss the importance of the different customer personas that he must be aware of and attuned to, the importance of internal partnerships, and the capabilities that drive innovation in the business, specifically data-edge capabilities, smart edge, IoT, and AI and machine learning. We end with Mike’s outlook on the growing importance of AI and machine learning.

Constructing Brands
The Transformation of Fire Protection and Fire Safety, with Shane Ray

Constructing Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 8:24


The Transformation of Fire Protection and Fire Safety, with Shane Ray Building Materials Industry | The Evolution of the Fire Safety Industry As president of the NFSA and a former fire marshall in South Carolina, Shane Ray has dedicated his life to fire safety. Prior to coming into his role at the National Fire Sprinkler Association, Shane served as a firefighter for most of his career. He familiarized himself with a handful of different fire protection device and equipment manufacturers that were used both in the field and in the structures themselves. But when it comes to fire protection in the building materials industry, the NFSA is down to just four major players: Tyco, Globe, Reliable, and Viking. M&As and Consolidation in Fire Safety Every member of the National Fire Sprinkler Association is devoted to fire protection and saving lives. And while the mergers, acquisitions, and overall consolidation of the equipment manufacturers has resulted in fewer brands, they are leveraging each others strengths to build higher quality components and make the equipment better. We have seen this trend many times in the building materials industry, but in this case, it comes from a combined interest of preventing and suppressing fires. The Future of Fire Protection and Fire Safety If you are in the building materials industry, you understand that evolution sparks a grow-or-die mentality. But sometimes it’s a matter of niching down to drive new trends that serve the greater good. The same holds true in fire protection, and tech is another factor that has come into play. Most of the modern sprinkler systems are incorporating more and more electronic components, smart technology, and IoT, so it is creating new opportunities for the NFSA to collect data and determine where they are performing and where they need improvement. To learn more about the transformation of the fire protection industry, listen to the latest episode of GWP’s Constructing Brands. About Shane Ray Shane Ray has been a volunteer firefighter since 1984 and a career firefighter since 1994. He has also served as a mayor for six years and the Tennessee Fire Chief’s Legislative Chairman for 12 years. Ray’s love for politics started as fire chief of the Pleasant View Volunteer Fire Department in Tennessee, where he served 13 years. He then served under Governor Nikki Haley in South Carolina as superintendent and state fire marshal. He currently serves as the president of the National Fire Sprinkler Association and is a lifetime member of the Pleasant View Volunteer Fire Department. Throughout his career, he has been committed to public service with a “Do It Different” mentality and that all stakeholders are important. What You Will Learn: Shane’s role as the president of the National Fire Sprinkler Association What influenced the consolidation of suppliers, contractors, and manufacturers in the fire protection industry How technology has played a role in the evolution of the fire protection industry What the future holds for fire protection equipment based on current trends How the NFSA is utilizing data and analytics to identify new opportunities for improvement Resources: Website: https://nfsa.org/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shane-ray-9b82786/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/national-fire-sprinkler-association/ Twitter: @chiefrays @NFSAorg Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NFSA.org/ Email: ray@NFSA.org Phone: 845-745-2671

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
524: Neil Werde on Recognizing Quality Dog Treats.

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 29, 2020 33:11


Breaking the mold on traditional canine snacks. In This Podcast: As gardeners, we think of our health and the food we put in our bodies but have you thought much about what you feed your pets? Treats should benefit your dog's health as well as taste good. We talked canine healthy treats with Neil Werde and got the inside scoop on the best ingredients and processing method for a quality dog treat.  Neil dove into some of the findings around Raw and Mediterranean diets for your furry friends as well as pet toys that keep your children safe too. Don't miss an episode! Click here to sign up for podcast updatesor visit www.urbanfarm.org/podcast Neil has over 40 years of experience creating and marketing consumer products including children's toys at Tyco and Mattel, pop culture & music at Rhino Records, and for the past 18 years durable toy products in the pet industry. He has delighted parents, children, and our four-legged friends with thoughtful and innovative products and solutions. Neil co-founded the Quaker Pet Group, and in 2015 they merged into pet industry innovator Worldwise, Inc, where his product development team has been focused on bringing healthy treats to our canine friends. Visit www.urbanfarm.org/olvipet for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library! 524: Neil Werde on Recognizing Quality Dog Treats.

Let's Face The Facts - A Facts Of Life Podcast by David Almeida
069 - S4E14 "Under Pressure" with Dr. Steve Summers

Let's Face The Facts - A Facts Of Life Podcast by David Almeida

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2020 54:21


Dr. Steve and I discuss and/or mention in passing: Asaad Kelada, Who’s The Boss, Sandra K. Siegel, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island, Eight Is Enough, The Brady Brides, The Brady Girls Get Married, Under Pressure, Queen, David Bowie, Blood Pressure, Awkward Long Pauses, Don Ho, Shoot vs. Shit, Appleton Wisconsin, Milwaukee Wisconsin, Cincinnati Ohio, Bracelet Key Rings, Trapper Keeper, The Ambassador Handbag, Uncle Arthur, Bewitched, Elizabeth Maupin , The Orlando Sentinel, Volkswagen Beetles, Chekhov, Tyco, Barbie, Legos, Central Florida Community Arts, Seminole State College.Connect with Let’s Face The Facts! Website • Twitter • Instagram • Facebook • PatreonPlease SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW!

Under the Influence from CBC Radio
S7E01 (Archive) - Put It Between Your Knees and Squeeze: Marketing A Fad

Under the Influence from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2019 26:59


From the Digital Box Set: Kicking off season 7, we explore how some of the craziest fads are marketed. We'll look at how one student's school project changed the way we sleep, why a single toy made Tyco the subject of bomb threats and how a popular piece of jewellery was inspired...by doctors. From the Thighmaster to the Pet Rock, we'll break down what makes fads so absolutely irresistible. This is an archived episode that aired originally on January 4, 2018.

Cleared Hot
Cleared Hot Episode 105 - Evy Poumpouras

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2019 144:48


Evy Poumpouras packs an incredible punch in a small package...She is a former Secret Service Special Agent who worked the protective details for President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, President George W. Bush, William Clinton, and George H. Bush. Evy worked complex criminal investigations and undercover operations, executed search and arrest warrants, and investigated both violent and financial crimes. Additionally, Evy was an interrogator for the agency’s elite polygraph unit and trained by the Department of Defense in the art and science of lie detection, human behavior, and cognitive influence. Evy Poumpouras is a multi-platform journalist and host who frequently appears on NBC, MSNBC, CNN, and ABC. She covers a wide range of topics, such as national security, law enforcement, personal protection, behavioral analysis, situational awareness, and how to live life fearlessly. Outside of her role as a journalist, Evy is a TEDx speaker and international advisor whose expertise is sought worldwide. She has been a keynote speaker for NASDAQ, SOCOM, Yankee Stadium Series, United Technologies, Corcoran Group, Tyco, Skanska, Red Door Spa, amongst many others. She is an Adjunct Professor for The City University of New York where she teaches criminal justice and criminology. Evy was also cast on CBS’s TV series “The Hunted.” Evy holds a Master of Science from Columbia University in Journalism, a Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology from Argosy University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and International Affairs from Hofstra University. She is also a former New York City Police Academy recruit, and a graduate of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Secret Service Academy, and the Department of Defense Polygraph Institute.