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Best podcasts about us peace corps

Latest podcast episodes about us peace corps

Hospitality Hangout
How Revolving Sushi Led To Automated BOH Operations | Season 8, Vol. 19

Hospitality Hangout

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 41:50


In the latest episode of Hospitality Hangout, Michael Schatzberg “The Restaurant Guy” and Jimmy Frischling “The Finance Guy” chat with Bo Davis, co-founder and chief executive officer of MarginEdge.Davis before founding MarginEdge was the founder of Wasabi, a group of conveyor belt sushi restaurants currently operating in DC and Boston. Before Wasabi, he was in the US Peace Corps serving in Macedonia, earned an MS in Finance from London Business School, and founded an educational software company, Prometheus, which he sold to Blackboard in 2002. Davis had a restaurant in Northern Virginia and where he is based and primarily focuses on MarginEdge. In December 2022 MarginEdge secured $45 million in a Series C funding. Davis says, “as far as deploying new capital, we're not pivoting, we're digging in, where we are here to help restaurant restaurateurs operate and make their back lives a little bit easier, solve some problems for them so they can focus on their customers and their food.” Davis talks about the team and shares, “We're continuing to grow our product team now, we wrote most of the core product with five people and now we're growing to 45 people and dev, our sales team was a handful of people for a long time. We're now at about 50 people there, so we're just building out the team, we're going to market and we're pretty excited about it.” MarginEdge primarily focussed on selling to restaurants will now be selling to accountants and accounting firms that work with restaurants. Davis talks about selling to accounting firms and he says, “You know it's one of those things where we were doing it before, not really realizing we were doing it because it wasn't intentional but bookkeepers and accounting firms working with restaurants found the software super helpful because it basically takes out part of the headache of just capturing the invoices, getting them into accounting, tying in the point of sales, getting that into the accounting system so they can focus on the higher value things that they do, the cash flow management and the strategic stuff. And so we found that some of our biggest clients were actually firms.” To hear Davis' answer for Tuesday Trivia and the new rollout for MarginEdge check out this episode of Hospitality Hangout.

IT TECH TALK
Bo Davis CEO at MarginEdge

IT TECH TALK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 33:19


Prior to founding MarginEdge, Bo was the founder of Wasabi. Wasabi is a group of conveyor belt sushi restaurants currently operating in DC and Boston. Prior to Wasabi, Bo was in the US Peace Corps serving in Macedonia, earned an MS in Finance from London Business School, and founded an educational software company, Prometheus, which he sold to Blackboard in 2002. MarginEdge backstory: Where hospitality met technology Our story began in a place where many restaurateurs have been themselves—stuck doing manual invoice data entry and inventory in a tiny closet in the back of a kitchen, wondering why the love of food and hospitality came with so many paper cuts. Bo and Roy, two of our founders, have more than 40 years of restaurant experience between them. They've built and operated over 25 restaurants around the nation. Even though the size of their back offices differed, the problems they faced as operators didn't. With a background in successful tech entrepreneurship, Bo assembled Roy and two long-time friends, colleagues, and successful technologists, Mike and Sam. Together, they constructed a creative solution to make running a restaurant easier— and MarginEdge was born. From one picture to the big picture! It all starts with your closing manager snapping photos of invoices with their smartphones. We take it from there – every line item and every handwritten note is captured! We then integrate with your POS, so each day you know everything you bought and everything you sold! A rolling P&L with drill down capability and it flows effortlessly to your Accounting System of choice. In between, our tech: - does data entry of all of your invoices - updates pricing on your inventory sheets (food and beverage) - updates your ordering sheets - keeps your recipes – prep and plated – prices up to date with a real time kitchen recipe viewer - alerts you if the prices of key ingredients jump - determines theoretical food and beverage cost/usage vs actual We are currently working with 1,000+ restaurants in 35 states, from QSR to Fine Dining - Join Us!

Mscs Media
Andrew Bustamante - CIA Agent - Nuclear Missile Officer - "MSCS MEDIA THROWBACK #68"

Mscs Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 191:19


Andrew Bustamante THROWBACK. Andrew is a former covert CIA intelligence officer, US Air Force combat veteran, and Fortune 10 corporate advisor founder of https://EverydaySpy.com is Full of knowledge, and experience. https://andrewbustamante.org/ What's it like being a spy for the CIA, head of Nuclear Missle Options? A Fortune 10 corporate advisor. After 20 years of leading human and technical intelligence operations for corporate and government clients, Andrew founded EverydaySpy.com - the first-ever online platform designed to teach elite spy skills to everyday people. Featured in both US and International media, Andrew's training content has been praised for its innovative, authentic, and life-changing impact. When he isn't giving interviews, running spy exercises, or supporting private intelligence contracts around the world, Andrew lives with his wife (also an ex-CIA Officer) and two children in Florida. General background: - Raised in rural Pennsylvania, left for college on a full-ride scholarship (US Air Force Academy) - 5 years as a Nuclear Missile officer in the US Air Force - Recruited into CIA after applying to the US Peace Corps - 7 years living/working undercover with CIA's Directorate of Operations (aka National Clandestine Service) - Background in Asian languages: Chinese, Thai, Japanese - Traveled through 18 countries and 6 continents with more every year! To see the newest Epsidose click below: Andrew Buestamente - CIA Spy - Nuclear Missile Operations - Founder Everyday Spy - Mscs Media - *215 https://spoti.fi/3WW7yVO Stay in touch with Andrew Bustamante: Everyday Spy: https://EverydaySpy.com Andrew Bustamante: https://andrewbustamante.org/ Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/c/EverydaySpy IG: https://www.instagram.com/everydayspy/ Congrats on your appearance on Lex! ➔Please check out our Sponsors ➔Horome levels falling? Use MSCSMEDIA to get 25% off home test: https://trylgc.com/MSCSMEDIA Ty LetsGetChecked. ➔Weston Jon Boucher - Lucery Men's Clothing At an Affordable Price Without Losing Quality: https://www.westonjonboucher.com ➔Fiji: https://Fijiwater.com/mscs $5 off free shipping Unleash ➔Monster Energy: https://www.monsterenergy.com/us/mscs ➔Aura: See if any of your passwords have been compromised. Try 14 days for free: https://aura.com/MSCS Thank you to Aura ➔ Stay Connected With MSCS MEDIA on Spotify Exclusive: Watch all Mscs Media Video Podcasts UNCENSORED and UNCUT.: ► https://spoti.fi/3zathAe (1st time watching a video podcast on Spotify when you hit play a settings pop-up will show, tap under the settings pop-up to watch the video playing.) ► All Links to MSCS MEDIA:https://allmylinks.com/mscsmedia

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 77 – Unstoppable Transformational Changer with Shilpa Alimchandani

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 62:58


Shilpa Alimchandani immigrated from India to the United States when only a few months old. As with many immigrants we have interviewed here on Unstoppable Mindset, Shilpa grew up experiencing two worlds. As she describes it, she grew up in a South Asian home experiencing that culture, and later she experienced the wider world around her as she went to school and went out on her own. Her perspectives on her life and what she has learned are fascinating to hear about.   As you will experience, in addition to living, if you will, between two cultures, the color of her skin also caused her to experience challenges. Her “brown skin” did not fit within the normal world of dark-skinned people and her skin was certainly not white. As she tells us, some of the treatment she experienced showed her just how unfair people can be. However, as you will hear, she rose above much of that and has thrived in the world.   Shilpa will tell you about her life journey that lead her to form her company, MUK-tee which means “liberation” in Sanskrit. You will hear about her life as a leadership coach and as a DEI consultant helping many to move toward true transformational change.   About the Guest:   Shilpa Alimchandani is the Founder and Principal of Mookti Consulting. Mookti Consulting partners with clients to break free from oppressive systems and facilitate transformational change. In Sanskrit, mookti मुक्ति (MUK-tee) means liberation. Shilpa has more than 20 years of experience in diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI), leadership development, and intercultural learning. She is a DEI consultant, leadership coach, and facilitator who works with clients to develop holistic solutions that lead to transformational change. In her independent consulting practice, Shilpa has conducted DEI assessments, co-created DEI strategies with clients, facilitated high-impact workshops, and advised clients on issues of racial equity and justice. In her role as the Director of Learning & Innovation for Cook Ross, she built the learning and development function from the ground up and led the organization's curriculum and product development initiatives. With her deep knowledge of various learning modalities, intercultural leadership development, and human-centered design, Shilpa is able to craft interventions that are targeted, impactful, and appropriate for diverse, global audiences. Before her work at Cook Ross, Shilpa designed and implemented global leadership programs for the State Department, led the development of a global learning strategy for the Peace Corps, and taught in the School of International Service at American University. She has facilitated trainings in nearly 20 countries around the world, and has received numerous awards, including twice receiving the Peace Corps' Distinguished Service Award. She is the author of the book Communicating Development Across Cultures: Monologues & Dialogues in Development Project Implementation (Lambert Academic Publishing, 2010), and has been an invited speaker at numerous conferences, including The Forum on Workplace Inclusion and the Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research (SIETAR). She has also been a guest lecturer at numerous academic institutions, including Georgetown University and the United States Institute of Peace.   Social Media Links: Website: mookticonsulting.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shilpaalimchandani/     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi there you are listening to unstoppable mindset glad you're with us wherever you happen to be. Today we get to interview or chat with Shilpa Alimchandani and I got it right didn't I Shilpa   Michael Hingson  01:37 and Shilpa has formed her own company. She's worked with other companies. She's very much involved in the whole concept of diversity, equity and inclusion and we'll talk about that and and chat about that a little bit. But first Shilpa Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Shilpa Alimchandani  01:56 Thank you, Michael. I'm really happy to be here.   Michael Hingson  01:58 Shilpa lives in Silver Spring, Maryland. I've been there before it gets colder in the winter a little bit colder than it does here in Victorville in Southern California. But we're up on what's called the high desert. So we get down close to zero. A lot of winters. And so we know the cold weather. We don't get the snow though. But we cope. Well. Thank you for joining us. Why don't you start if you would by telling us just a little bit about you growing up or anything like that things that you think we ought to know about you?   Shilpa Alimchandani  02:32 Okay, well, Thanks, Michael. Yeah, I live in Silver Spring, Maryland now. But this is not where I grew up. I grew up in the Midwest, in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri. I was actually born in India, but just a few months old, when I came here, to the US, so grew up in, you know, pretty suburban neighborhood in South Asian families, so kind of navigated between two worlds my world at home, and you know, which was very much a South Asian eating Indian food and speaking Hindi. And, you know, spending time with my family and our small community, in St. Louis, and then going to school and being part of a broader world that was really different than mine at home. And I'm the firstborn in my family. So as a first born of immigrant parents, you just kind of discovering everything for myself for the first time and not having much of a guidebook to help me along, but just sort of figuring it out as I went. And it was a mostly white neighborhood that I grew up in St. Louis, which was very segregated at the time, black and white. Not a lot of people who are anything in between, though, so kind of made my way in school. And I actually went to the University of Missouri Columbia for college. And it wasn't until I finished college that I moved out to the East Coast. And I've stayed here in the DC metro area since working in lots of different capacities in in nonprofit and higher education and government and the private sector, and now as an independent consultant for the fast past few years.   Michael Hingson  04:22 So where do you fall in the black and white scale?   Shilpa Alimchandani  04:25 I'm neither right so as someone as South Asian did not kind of fit into the dominant white majority culture that I was a part of growing up and did not fit into black American culture either because that's not my heritage. So it was a really interesting space to, to navigate to learn in, in a in a culture where race and skin color plays a big role in your identity development and the opposite. unities that you have, you know, it was something that I had to just sort of figure out where do I fit? You know, and what's what's my role in what appears to be kind of an unfair system that we're a part of. And then as I discovered how unfair things were, might the question became, well, how do I change that? What's my role? Being me and my brown skin? You know, to? to question the systems that are unfair? And to change things to be more equitable for everybody?   Michael Hingson  05:32 Do you think it's unfair all over the world? Do you think it's more or less unfair here? Or what?   Shilpa Alimchandani  05:39 Yeah, that's a great question. I mean, every place is unique. And so I don't think like, you know, necessarily, what we experienced in the United States is the same as it is, and other countries in this hemisphere or anywhere else in the world. And I think there are some global themes around power and identity that really can cut across cultures and countries, you know, human beings are used to kind of creating hierarchies, you know, and, you know, some people having more authority, more power than others, sometimes that's based on things like skin color, sometimes, you know, that's based on gender, sometimes that's based on caste, or that's based on tribe or some other ethnic identity, there are lots of different identities that are used to kind of implement that hierarchical system. But there are some things that are in common across all of them, right about how people in power retain their power, how people without power, learn to kind of accept their circumstances. And, you know, and kind of not necessarily pushback, because when they do, there are consequences to that. And so that it's like a reinforcing system that we get used to, and we sort of take for granted. Well, that's just like, how the how the world is, that's how life is. And it takes a lot of courage to question that and say, Well, no, well, it doesn't have to be that way. And we can make things more fair for everybody.   Michael Hingson  07:20 Do you think though, that here, we we see more of that than elsewhere in the world, or you think it just seems that way, because we're here,   Shilpa Alimchandani  07:30 and probably seems that way, because we're here, I mean, you, you know, you, you know, you're more in touch with what's happening, usually in your own environment. And I think, for the United States, with as much promise as it has, as a country with, you know, ideals around equality and fairness and justice, there's just a really difficult history that we haven't fully grappled with, that continues to impact people every day. And so it is a history of, you know, genocide of native peoples, it's a history of enslavement of African peoples. It's a history of patriarchy, where, you know, women haven't had the same access and rights, it's a history of ableism. You know, a topic, of course, that you know, very well in this podcast deals with in a really nuanced way, where people who don't fit into the norms of, you know, able bodied neurotypical folks, you know, are marginalized. And, and, you know, LGBTQ plus, folks are also marginalized. And that's not unique to the United States. But it is part of something that's part of our culture, that we need to acknowledge in order to change, kind of pretending like it's all in the past, and we don't really need to worry about that anymore, doesn't help us to make things better moving forward.   Michael Hingson  09:01 If there's a difference in the United States, it is that our country was founded on and we keep touting the fact that all of us are free, and all of us are equal, but in reality, it hasn't worked that way thus far.   Shilpa Alimchandani  09:20 Right? That's exactly right. And I think that it's often people from marginalized groups, who really believed most passionately, in that promise in those ideals and therefore want to push to make that a reality.   Michael Hingson  09:39 Yeah, and, and understandably so because we're the ones who tend not to have truly experienced it.   Shilpa Alimchandani  09:49 Right, exactly. And so, you know, it's fascinating to me to Michael on this topic of, you know, recognizing the you know, the inequities and the oppression that exists And what we want to do to change it is that you would think that if you understand or experience oppression or marginalization because of one aspect of your identity, that you would then also have empathy across lots of different experiences of marginalization, right. So for example, as a woman, I've experienced marginalization because of my gender. And so you would hope then that I would be empathetic to, you know, LGBTQ folks, or I wouldn't be also empathetic to people with disabilities. And I could translate my experience of marginalization and say, oh, I want to advocate for others who've experienced marginalization. But that is has not necessarily been the case, right? A lot of times, we kind of only focus on our own experience, the one that's familiar to us and have a harder time seeing how there are connections across lots of different identities. And there's power in us actually making those connections instead of, you know, operating in our silos.   Michael Hingson  11:11 Why is that? Why have we why have we not been able to take that leap? When we are part of one group, which clearly is marginalized, as opposed to other groups? Who are also marginalized, but we think essentially, we're really the the only one in town from the standpoint of not translating that.   Shilpa Alimchandani  11:35 Yeah, you know, I think it's, we are as human beings, much more aware of when we're kind of the outsider, and things are harder for us. And we've experienced adversity that we need to overcome. But when we're in that insider role, right, in the group that has more power, the dominant group, it's really easy to not pay attention to that to kind of forget it, to take it for granted. Right. So I can say that, you know, as, as a cisgender person, as a heterosexual person, I have at times in my life kind of taken for granted that I belong to those groups, because the world is sort of set up for me, I can date who want to want marry who I want, I don't have to worry about people looking at me, you know, strangely, when I'm with my partner, I don't have to think about having photographs of my family, you know, on display, these are not things I have to worry about, just because I'm part of those dominant identity groups, right. And when it comes to my experiences of marginalization as a South Asian person as a Hindu person living in the United States, I'm very, like, hyper aware of those, right, because that's where I have felt left out. That's where I have felt like I haven't been treated fairly. And so I think, because all about sort of like a complex mix of lots of identities, we tend to pay more attention to the ones where we experienced marginalization, and less attention to the ones where we are part of the dominant group.   Michael Hingson  13:13 But we don't translate that to other groups.   Shilpa Alimchandani  13:16 Yeah. Because, again, we can we have the capacity to do it. But uh, sure, more effort, right.   Michael Hingson  13:22 Sure. And, and it's all about, though, what, what we know, and what we feel. And we, we don't tend to take that leap. We're very capable of doing it. But for some reason, we don't recognize or don't want to recognize that we're part of maybe a bigger group of marginalized or unconsidered people. And I think that's probably really it, that we look at ourselves as well. We are, we are who we are, and we make our own way. But we, we don't have those other people's problems. And so we tend to ignore them.   Shilpa Alimchandani  14:07 Yeah, sometimes it makes us feel better about ourselves like, oh, well, you know, at least we don't have to deal with that. And I think when it when it comes to like race and ethnicity in the US context, there's been a conscious effort to divide people of color from different identity groups. We do have different lived experiences, I don't have the experience of someone being black of someone being Latinx of someone being indigenous, at the same time, there are some things in common across not being white, right? And what the the the exclusion and some of the disadvantages that come with that. But it's to the advantage of the group that's in power right? For other marginalized groups to be continuing to sort of fight with one another and not see what they haven't Common, because then that allows the majority group to maintain their power. Right? So you can keep fighting amongst yourselves, right and arguing about who was more oppressed than whom. But it, it, what it does is just allows the people who are in power to keep it. So it really is incumbent upon us to bridge some of those divides like you were talking about, like, why can't we extend and see how someone else has experienced marginalization in order to change things because it's that collective action is necessary.   Michael Hingson  15:33 Yeah. And that's really it, it's collective action. Because somehow, we need to recognize that the group in power isn't really jeopardized by other people, sharing power, or not being so marginalized, but rather is strengthens all of us. Mm hmm. That's what people tend to not perceive that they're, the whole concept of their power in numbers, there is power in numbers, really is just as applicable across the board. But we don't want to recognize that because we're too focused on the power, as opposed to the rest of it. Yeah. And that, that becomes pretty unfortunate. And, of course, dealing with all those other groups, and then you have people with disabilities, which is a very large minority, second only to women from a standpoint of what we call minorities, although they're more women than men, but then within disabilities, you have different kinds of disabilities that different people have, right. And that, that causes, I think, a lot of times another issue, because it is more difficult to get all of those groups sometimes to combine together to recognize the power and numbers of everyone working together. And everyone overcoming the prejudices is about for about their disabilities or toward other people and their disabilities.   Shilpa Alimchandani  17:06 Yeah, absolutely. And to even consider, you know, the, the intersections of our identities, right, so there are people with disabilities, many different types of disabilities, like you said, and then there are people with disabilities who are white, or people with disabilities, who are people of color, there are people with disabilities who are, you know, identify as cisgender women or cisgender men, or non binary or trans, right. And so when you kind of look at those combination of identities, it gets even more complex. And it also challenges us, right, it humbles us, I would say, to acknowledge that, wow, I may really be in touch with what it's what the experience of being a person with disability in this country, and but I don't have the experience, for example, of a person of color in this country, or a person of color with a disability in this country, and that those are different experiences. And to appreciate those differences, right? We don't need to erase those differences in order to understand each other,   Michael Hingson  18:13 while the experiences are different, what isn't different, oftentimes, is the fact that we do experience prejudice and discrimination. And we talk so much about diversity, that I think you've pointed out, we don't talk about the similarities. And we're, we talk well, we're talking about becoming more diverse, and that's great. But that becomes overwhelming at some point. And so how do we bring it back down to we're all part of the same thing? Really?   Shilpa Alimchandani  18:47 Well, I think, um, there's, there's a, there's kind of a journey that that we go on in understanding difference and understanding identity, you know, at first we may not be at, you know, totally aware of some of the differences around us, and then we might move to a place of feeling polarized around it, you know, that like us them dynamic, yep, there are differences, but we're better than you, you know, and that kind of a thing, and then we get to a place. And what I'm describing here, broadly, is the intercultural development continuum, a framework that's used a lot in the DEI space, you can come to a place of minimization, which is really focusing on commonalities, right. We are human, we have common lived experiences, we can focus on common values, and let's minimize the differences right? But that's not the end of the journey, because minimizing the differences is at times denying the reality of of people's different lived experiences. And it doesn't help us to really change things to make them more fair where they're not. So then we move to kind of accepting the differences not with value judgment, but just acknowledging them. And then ultimately adapting across those differences, I would take it a step further that not only are we bridging or adapting across the differences, but that we need to learn to be allies, right? So especially if we're in a position of being part of a dominant group, like as I am as an able bodied person, you know, what does it look like for me to be an ally, for people with disabilities, and that's a responsibility that I have, right. So if we minimize differences, and we just kind of stay in that place of let's just focus on what we have in common, we don't then have the opportunity to accept, adapt and ultimately become allies. And that's really the journey that we're on,   Michael Hingson  20:44 what I don't generally hear is not so much about what we have in common, or recognizing that we all can be allies, which I absolutely agree with and understand. But we don't get to the point of recognizing the vast number of similarities that we have. And we don't get to the point of recognizing that a lot of the so called differences are not anything other than what we create ourselves,   Shilpa Alimchandani  21:16 we do create differences. And we need to understand those differences in terms of systems, right, like entire systems in our society, and the way that our, you know, workplaces are set up and within the way, you know, physical spaces, as well as policies are developed. And those systems are not necessarily designed as fairly as they could be. And so that's when I think paying attention to differences is really important, and not just focusing on similarities, because the same system is impacting people differently, depending on what identity group they belong to. And we've got to be able to surface that in order to change it.   Michael Hingson  22:02 But we do need to recognize that a lot of that comes because of the system, as opposed to whether there are real differences, or there are differences that we create. Yeah, well, I mean,   Shilpa Alimchandani  22:13 humans create systems, right. And so we can agree design systems to, but what happens is a little bit like a fish in water kind of scenario, that we don't really recognize the water that we're swimming in, you know, we it really takes us having to leave the environment and look back at it to be able to say like, oh, that's what's going on. Right? Most of the time, we don't pay attention to those systems, we just operate within them without thinking about it.   Michael Hingson  22:43 And that's my point. And that's, that's exactly it. And so we sometimes somehow have to take a step back or a step up, maybe as you would describe it to get out of the water and look at the water, and see what we can do to make changes that would make it better. And that's the leap that I don't generally see us making as a race yet.   Shilpa Alimchandani  23:12 Yeah, they're, you know, they're definitely great examples of that, you know, in, in our history, and in other parts of the world as well, like when made, you know, when countries that had been colonized for a number of years, you know, finally get their freedom when, you know, there's real truth and reconciliation efforts after a war or a period of conflict. It is it is possible, it's something that has happened. And, and I think, you know, we're kind of in a moment in our culture, where people are asking a lot of these kinds of questions. What, what's not working in the status quo and the way things are, and what needs to shift this, the pandemic, has really brought those issues front and center, the movement for racial justice has has done the same. And I think it's it's actually an exciting opportunity and exciting moment to be like, oh, people are actually talking about systems now.   Michael Hingson  24:14 Yeah, it's, it's interesting. Henry Mayer wrote a book called all on fire, which is a biography of William Lloyd Garrison. Have you ever read that? I have not. Okay. So William Lloyd Garrison, you may or may not know was a very famous abolitionist in I think, the 1840s there was a reporter and he got very much involved in the abolishing slavery. And as I said, Henry Mayer was a biographer of his and wrote this book called all on fire and in the book, there is a section where, where Garrison wanted to bring into the fold, some women the Grimm case sisters, who were very much involved in women's suffrage. And he Garrison said to his people, please contact them, let's bring them in. And their response was, but they're not involved in this their field dealing with women's suffrage, and they're not interested in this. And Garrison said something very interesting, which was, it's all the same thing. He took the leap. And he said, It's all the same thing, whether it's suffrage, whether it's slavery, abolition, or whatever, Abolishment. It's all the same thing. And that's the leap, that we generally don't take any of us on any side.   Shilpa Alimchandani  25:39 Yeah, I don't know who to credit for this quote that I've heard many times. But the idea that none of us is free until all of us are free.   Michael Hingson  25:48 Yeah. Right. And interesting and interesting, quote, and true.   Shilpa Alimchandani  25:52 And that's really, you know, I had shared with you, Michael, that my, my practice is called mukti. And Mukti means liberation or freedom in Sanskrit. And that was really kind of what was behind, you know, like, I was thinking about, like, why do I do this work? What, what motivates me? What is this ultimately about? And to your point of, you know, these experiences, whether it be suffrage, or abolishing slavery, or whatever, having some really important things in common is that we want to be free, we, as humans want to be free. And there are a lot of things that get in our way. And so that kind of became the heart of my practice is like, what does it look like to work for that freedom?   Michael Hingson  26:38 Well, let's go back to you personally, and so on. So you grew up? I think you have, and that's a good thing. And so how did you get involved in all of this division, this business of Dei? And and what you do today? What What got you started down that path? And what did you do that got you to the point of starting this company?   Shilpa Alimchandani  27:02 Yeah, so you know, certainly growing up in the 80s, and 90s. In St. Louis, there really wasn't a dei field as such, it wasn't like one of those careers that you know, about and, and prepare for, like, you know, like being an engineer or a doctor or a teacher or something like that. So it was a kind of a winding indirect path to get to this place. I knew pretty early on that I cared about justice that I cared about people understanding each other and bridging differences. But I didn't know that could be my job. So at first I thought maybe I'll become a lawyer. And then you know, I could use like legal skills to fight for justice and things like that. I even took the LSAT and never applied to law school, I was like, I don't really want to be a lawyer. So I explored a bit I worked in nonprofit, and in higher ed, and began to learn that well, there really is kind of a in the late 90s, early 2000s, like a an a growing field, in educating people about diversity. And that was kind of new to me, I was excited about that. I wanted to learn more about it. And early on, it was kind of more focused on representation, right? We need to bring people together from different backgrounds, in workplaces, and schools, etc. And then that sort of evolved into, well, it's not just enough to bring people from different backgrounds together, you need to have an environment where people feel included, where they feel valued, right. So it kind of evolved from not just diversity to diversity and inclusion. And I think kind of the more recent iteration of the field is the E in diversity, equity and inclusion. And the equity piece being really looking at that systemic part, we were just talking about, how are our systems working for us? Where are their inequities built into those systems? How can those be corrected? So that we actually have a place where people from different backgrounds can feel included and valued and feel treated fairly, and paid fairly? For the work that they do? Right, so that's when all of those come together? Of course, there's additions to that as well. Some organizations add accessibility as an aide to that, you know, some include justice. So there's, this becomes a bit of an alphabet soup, but all with the this idea of differences, valuing differences and treating people fairly at the heart of, of this work.   Michael Hingson  29:50 And that's really what it's about. And as you point out, it's really about equity. I've noticed and I'm still very serious We maintain the whole concept of diversity is much less of a really good goal to seek. Traditionally, diversity leaves out disabilities. In fact, I interviewed someone a few weeks ago. And this person talked about different kinds of diverse groups, and listed a number of things and never once mentioned disabilities, and I asked him about that. I said, I'm not picking on you, but you didn't include disabilities. And he talked about social attitudes. And he said, well, it, it includes social attitudes in some way. And my point was, No, it doesn't really, because social attitudes are a different animal and don't have anything to do with dealing with disabilities to disabilities is a different kind of thing. Yeah. So it's, it's interesting how different people approach it. Now, this particular individual was a person who is involved with another, another minority group, but still, we have to face that. Yeah. And it makes for a very interesting situation, and it makes for a challenge in life.   Shilpa Alimchandani  31:16 Yeah, I mean, it's one of those places where, you know, I have privilege as someone who doesn't experience disabilities in my life on a daily basis. And I That means for me, like to be an ally, like, what we were talking about earlier, is that I need to educate myself, right? I need to look for those opportunities, where I feel like well, yeah, sure. This is easy and accessible for me, but it wouldn't be for our friends and colleagues and people who don't have the same abilities that I do. And what can we do to change that? Okay, that that's what ally ship looks like. And I know, it can be overwhelming, right? People say, oh, there's so many, you listed so many things under this umbrella of diversity? Like how can how can we possibly, you know, pay attention to all of it. And I actually don't think it's, it's too hard for us. I think, as human beings, we have this amazing capacity for empathy, we have this capacity to our minds are malleable, we can continue to learn and grow throughout our lives, we have to have the will to do it. Right. And, and put the effort in to do it. But it is possible.   Michael Hingson  32:27 It's interesting to look at and one of the things that I think I see, and this is from my perspective, as a as a blind person, or let's say a person with a disability, it's it's interesting how I think sis Thai society teaches that all the rest of us are better than persons with disabilities to a great degree am. And I think it's very systemic. And I think, to a very large degree, it does go across all sorts of different lines. But we teach people that I teach our children that disabilities make those people less in ways that it doesn't necessarily apply to other groups. Although the concept and the overall process is the same, it still comes down to, we're in power, we're better than they, but it does go across a lot of different lines. And when we teach people that disabilities are less, that's a problem that somehow we, as part of all this need to overcome.   Shilpa Alimchandani  33:37 Yeah. And you know, it's ultimately, Michael, to your point, it's dehumanizing. We're dehumanizing entire groups of people. And sometimes it's like, quote, unquote, well intentioned, but it's really more of a pity than it is an understanding of respect and empathy for someone else's experience. And nobody needs that. Right. Nobody wants to be felt sorry for, you know,   Michael Hingson  34:06 yeah. And I think that that probably is more true. When you're dealing with a person with a disability, then a lot of other groups, you won't feel sorry for them, you may distrust them, or whatever. But for disabilities, we feel sorry. And that promotes fear. Gosh, we sure wouldn't want to be like them.   Shilpa Alimchandani  34:29 Right? Because that's the worst thing that could happen, right? So it creates more of that division of, I'm not like you and I don't want to be like you, you know, right.   Michael Hingson  34:40 Right. On the other hand, disabilities is an equal opportunity, kind of a thing. Anyone can join us at any given time unexpectedly, or maybe expectedly. But to use a bad word expectedly I don't know that's not a word. But anyway, Yes. So we have to learn to speak. But still, it is something that anyone can experience. And we don't try to equalize. So it is a it is a challenge. But But again, let's look at you what what was your career like getting into this? So it wasn't a job that really existed as such. And then you kind of discovered that maybe it really was. And so you decided not to be a lawyer, and we won't talk about the the legitimacy or efficacy of not being a lawyer, although, oh, many lawyer jokes out there. But But what did you then do? Yeah,   Shilpa Alimchandani  35:45 so, you know, my early work was at a nonprofit that no longer exists, but it was the national multicultural Institute. And they were kind of doing diversity training for organizations, and like the World Bank, and educational institutions, and some nonprofits and, and then, so I discovered, like, Oh, this is becoming a growing thing that businesses organizations want education, around issues of diversity, and how they can work better together across difference. So that was really fascinating to me, I also got involved in cross cultural communication. So when I was teaching at American University, it was in the School of International Service, which has had as a requirement for any international studies major, to take a course on cross cultural communication, to recognize that, you know, depending on what culture or part of the world we're from, we really kind of think differently, communicate differently. And it doesn't mean that that thinking or that communication is good or bad, but it's different. And we really need to appreciate, you know, how some cultures are much more direct, and some are much less so right, very indirect, how some cultures were engaged in conflict, really, you know, emotionally and others are much more emotionally restrained, you know, and some are much more individualistic, and others being more collectivist. So I started really studying these issues, and realizing that there really was an opportunity to educate people about some of these cultural differences and identity differentials, and ultimately power differences that exist in our societies. So I worked internationally, I worked at the Peace Corps, and I've traveled with the Peace Corps to different countries, to train staff who worked for the US Peace Corps. I worked for the State Department, and I did leadership drug development work there to prepare Foreign Service officers before they go abroad and during their service on how to lead effectively in those global environments. And then, I decided to leave government after a while and, and pursue private sector. And there's a lot like in the private sector. Well, there are a lot of organizations that invest heavily in diversity, equity and inclusion, big training programs, a real focus on how to make their policies and procedures more equitable. So that was really interesting, you know, to get into that consulting space, first working for a firm called cook Roth, and then three years ago, I went out on my own and, and started my own practice. And I love the work it's it's challenging, you know, there's some people who are in it for the right reasons, and others, maybe not as much. So I'm learning a lot in this field, now 20 to 20 plus years into it, but but also feeling quite fulfilled in   Michael Hingson  38:46 the work that I do. So what does cook Ross do? Or what did they do?   Shilpa Alimchandani  38:50 They're a diversity, equity and inclusion consulting firm, that they work a lot with the fortune 500, even fortune 100 corporate sector. In my independent consulting practice, I'm doing less kind of corporate work and more work in the NGO sector, with smaller businesses, nonprofit organizations, and the like.   Michael Hingson  39:13 What made you decide to go out on your own?   Shilpa Alimchandani  39:16 Oh, I had thought about starting my own business many times, and really erred on the side of stability and a stable paycheck for so many years. Until finally, I had some supports in place, right, talking about systems. I had some supports in place to make it possible for me to go out on my own. I had a partner who had a steady job with health insurance for for us and for our two children. My parents moved closer to where we live. So I had some family support in the area. And then, you know, decided just to take the leap and have confidence in myself and what I could offer as a consultant as a facility cater to clients. And the vast majority of my work is through word of mouth, I really don't even do much marketing. And I'm very fortunate to be in that role, but it also just showed me like, oh, you might have maybe you could have done this sooner. But it took me a while to feel like I had the the support and the confidence to do that.   Michael Hingson  40:21 But even though you're on your own, do you still have a relationship? or do any work with cook Ross? Or do you still teach   Shilpa Alimchandani  40:29 other consulting firms, small consulting firm, so I subcontract for them. And if this I, in addition to my consulting, press practice, I, I became a certified coach, I went through a coaching program, and became an international coaching Federation, certified coach. So I work one on one with people, largely women of color leaders who are, you know, in periods of transition or growth in their lives and in their careers to help guide them through that process, and help them really tap into all of the strength that they have, and the wisdom that they have within themselves. So I have a lot of variety in the work that I do, which I really enjoy.   Michael Hingson  41:15 So you, you, you keep connections open? And that's always a good thing. Of course, indeed. So what kind of changes have you seen in the whole field of diversity, equity inclusion and such over the years?   Shilpa Alimchandani  41:32 You know, there have been a lot of changes, I think I mentioned early on, there was a lot of focus on representation, I think a big and then, you know, looking at the culture, and how can we be more inclusive, but even in that conversation about inclusive, Michael, there was a bit of teaching people to be like us, right, like, so there was still sort of a dominant majority white male, you know, able bodied, you know, cisgender, heterosexual, you know, culture. And we invite people who belong to other groups, marginalized identities to join us, but to kind of be like us, right, and then I saw shift will know, the point is not to make everybody act like the majority group, the point is to actually create a place where people with different experiences, different identities, can all thrive in the same environment. That means changing the environment, right? That means actually looking at some of those systems, looking at the culture, and saying, you know, if it's a culture of like, everybody goes out for happy hour after work, or they have important conversations on the golf course, or whatever, that that is really fundamentally excluding a lot of people from those informal ways that people hold power in the organization. So how do we create cultures and systems that are more fair for everyone, I think, now, especially post the murder of George Floyd in 2020. And a real reckoning with the history of racism in the United States, there's much more attention being paid to some of those systemic issues in with particular guard regard to race, but also other identity groups. And that's a big shift. There were a number of years when I worked in this space, where people were still, like, uncomfortable naming race, they would talk about diversity broadly, talk about all the different things that make us the rainbow people that we are, but not deal with some of the harder, stickier Messier subjects. And I think there's more of a willingness to do that now.   Michael Hingson  43:42 And they won't deal with the words. Yeah, go ahead.   Shilpa Alimchandani  43:45 Yeah, there's, there's more. So there's like a caveat to that. There's also a lot of people who say they want to do that more difficult and challenging work. But when confronted with it, actually retreat and say, Oh, no, I'm not comfortable to this. This is a bit too challenging, too threatening. It's making me really uncomfortable. And so there are organizations, there are leaders who have said one thing, right and publicly made announcements about how they're anti racist, or they're, you know, all about equity or whatever. But then that hasn't necessarily followed through in the action. So that's, that's something that's we're dealing with now, in the field. In some places, there's a openness, a recognition for some of those difficult topics and other places. It's really just on the surface. As soon as you go a little bit beneath the surface, you realize that the commitment is really not there.   Michael Hingson  44:44 Now you have me curious, so you've got you've got the company or the group that does go out on the golf course and make decisions or that goes out for lunch and has martinis and make decisions and There are reasons for it. The reasons being that you're going away from the company, you're going away from the environment. And you can think and you can have all sorts of rationales or reasons for doing it. But nevertheless, it happens. How do we change that? How do we address that issue? Do we, when we have people who were excluded, because they don't go out on the golf course? Do we create an environment for them to be able to go on the golf course? Or do we do something different? Or are we there yet?   Shilpa Alimchandani  45:31 Um, I think we're there. I think that first of all, you we need to recognize that some of those informal practices are in fact unfair. And then if you're wanting to let go of them and say, Well, what we liked about that was that it was somewhat informal, right? But are those the only informal spaces you can create? Right? Not necessarily. There are other ways that people can connect informally in an organizational context that aren't around, you know, alcohol or, or aren't around a particular sport, or aren't around a particular, you know, activity that necessarily excludes or that are always after hours. So this is something that women have really struggled with, is that, you know, if those important conversation side conversations are happening, not during work hours, and they're still to this day, women have more responsibilities at home with family than men do, then that's an automatic disadvantage. Like you you're not even in the room, you're not even there to be part of those exchanges. That doesn't just apply to women. But that's just that's an example. So how do we then think about leadership differently, how we develop people, what our decision making processes are, how we hold each other accountable for those decisions, it kind of comes down to your organizational values, and how you live those values in the way in which you lead and the way in which you engage in your work and your interactions with your colleagues. It's easy to say on paper much harder to practice those values. Why is that? Oh, well, you know, everybody likes to have on their website or on the wall in the conference room. Oh, we believe in integrity, we believe in inclusion, right? We believe in collaboration or whatever the values may be. But what does that actually mean? What does that look like? How do you make on how do I Shilpa behave in accordance with those values? Right? Question.   Michael Hingson  47:45 It gets back to Talk is cheap. Absolutely. Talk is really cheap. Talk is really cheap. It's easy   Shilpa Alimchandani  47:53 to make these pronouncements and to say the right thing. It's much harder to practice them. And so when I engage with clients, it's really looking at those organizations and those individuals that are interested in making some change. They're like, Okay, we know this is not going to happen overnight, it's not going to happen, because you did one workshop with us. And then we all went home, it's going to be it's going to happen over time. By articulating the behaviors. We want to practice building the skills to practice those behaviors, building the accountability for us to actually implement those behaviors and those changes in our policies, then we can actually create some long term change. That's not easy. It's not sexy, it's hard to work. And that's how you create a more diverse, equitable and inclusive organization.   Michael Hingson  48:47 And it is very uncomfortable, and it's what really causes a lot of the hatred. So why is it that people hate race differences so much, because they're different than us. They're not as good as we are. And although in reality, they can demonstrate that the hair is equal is we are whoever we are. The fact is that they're calling us on it. We don't like that we don't like change. And the reality is we need to learn to change.   Shilpa Alimchandani  49:16 Yeah, this whole idea, you know, we all think of ourselves as good people, right? So when someone points out some way in which I have exclude been exclusionary or discriminatory in my behavior, my first instinct is to defend myself, but I'm a good person, I would never try and hurt another or discriminate or exclude. But in fact, as a human being that operates in these systems that we are a part of, I haven't times excluded, I have at times been unfair in the way I've treated people and just and been discriminatory. And so it's important for me to be able to acknowledge that that I can be a good person, but part of being human is that I do have some of these checks. Challenges, then only can I change it and work to change some of the systems if we're going to live in denial like, Nope, we're good people, and therefore we can't hear any of this criticism. It's not possible for me to be unfair, unjust or discriminatory. And then how are we ever going to change?   Michael Hingson  50:16 Right? Which is, which is of course, the whole point, isn't it?   Shilpa Alimchandani  50:19 Yeah. But it's hard. It's a tough, but I really, I always come back to humility in this work, you. If you are to engage in a sincere way to build a more equitable and inclusive world for everyone across identity groups, you will be humbled time, and   Michael Hingson  50:37 it's hard because we haven't learned to do it. And also, many of us just really, ultimately don't have the desire to learn to do it. And that's what we have to change. What are some of the major mistakes that you've seen organizations make? I think you've referred to some of this already. But it's worth exploring a little more.   Shilpa Alimchandani  50:57 You know, one thing that we haven't talked about yet, but I often hear from clients who seek out my services, is that, oh, we really need to focus on recruitment, right, we just need to get more diverse leadership team, we need to do a better job of reaching out to, you know, XYZ group that's underrepresented in our organization. And they put a lot of effort into recruitment. And then what happens, you bring in people from all these different backgrounds that you said, weren't represented, and now they're there, but there hasn't been much emphasis on inclusion or equity. And you've created a revolving door. Because very soon, people from those marginalized identity groups discover this isn't a place where they really feel like they're valued, or it's not a place that set up to really support them to be successful. And they leave. And then those same organizations are like, well, we put all this money and time and effort into diversifying, what did we do wrong? So to that, my I, what I say time and time again, is we have to start with equity and inclusion. And then the diversity will come if you don't start with diversity and with recruitment, and then just with wishful thinking, hope that it all works out. Once everybody's together in that organization, quite often it doesn't.   Michael Hingson  52:18 It ultimately comes down to changing the mindset, which is really what doesn't happen. And diversity doesn't change the mindset. And I think that's something that conceptually inclusion can really help to do is to change the mindset if you're really going to look at what inclusion means. And that's why I've always loved to talk about and I have a speech called moving from diversity to inclusion, because people clearly have already changed diversity to the point where it doesn't necessarily represent everyone. But ultimately, all those people, I think, still try to do it. You can't say you're inclusive, unless you are, you can talk about being partially inclusive. But that doesn't mean a thing. Either you're inclusive where you're not, then that means changing a mindset.   Shilpa Alimchandani  53:01 It does mean changing a mindset. And that mindset allows you to change some of your practices, like it can be as simple as like, how do you design an agenda for a meeting? And how do you facilitate that meeting? And how do you actually include all of the voices of the people who are part of that group? A lot of just a thing about how many times people and organizations how much time people spend in meetings, and a lot of them are not particularly inclusive, like half the people are checked out. There are a few people who dominate the conversation. Right? And it seems it's such a waste. It is such a waste, because there are ideas that are not getting shared, there are conversations that are not being had, there are conflicts that are not getting resolved. Right? Because we're just used to doing things in the same way. If we can change that mindset, like you said, and, and also some of the practices, even small things like that will make a difference, right? People will start speaking up in a different way. Right? Well, dialogue shifts,   Michael Hingson  54:07 and that's what we really need to work toward is that dialogue, shift that mindset change, and that makes a big difference in in all that we're doing. Tell me a little bit more about your company about mu T and what it does and how people can learn about it.   Shilpa Alimchandani  54:24 Great. So yeah, Mookti the M O OK T I. Consulting is my organization. As I mentioned earlier, Mookti means liberation. And I have two parts to my practice. One is organizational training and consulting. So I provide and facilitate workshops and and Leadership Development Series for organizations on all kinds of dei related topics. From you know, interrupting bias to Um feedback on microaggressions to you know, a leading with an equity lens and using the system's lens to solve problems in your organization. And, and I really enjoy that work that organizational training and consulting work. The other part of my practice is coaching. And that is one on one with individuals, primarily, I focus on women of color leaders, because coaching remains a white dominant profession in the US. And there's a real opportunity for people of color to enter this field and a lot of clientele who are looking for coaches who understand not just their leadership journey, but also how their identities impact them every day. So being a woman and a woman of color in a leadership role in an organization is different than being a man or being a white man in particular. And so those of one on one coaching conversations that I have with my clients really can unlock their potential, can free them up to make decisions that are more aligned with their values and make choices in their career that are more fulfilling for them. So in all aspects of my work, I'm about you know, freeing people, from the systems of oppression that limit us, some of that work is organizational. And some of it is individual,   Michael Hingson  56:21 if people want to reach out and contact you and explore working with you, and so on. How do they do that?   Shilpa Alimchandani  56:29 Sure. So my website is the best way to learn more about me and my work and also to contact me. And the website is simply mookticonsulting.com   Michael Hingson  56:40 Have you written any books? Or are there other places where people can get resources that you've been involved in creating? Yes, I   Shilpa Alimchandani  56:49 mean, I did write a book number of years ago, communicating development across cultures, which is more focused on cross cultural communication in the international development field. So not as much on organizational dei work as I'm doing now. I'm quite active on LinkedIn and and do post my own articles on LinkedIn. So that's a good place to find me as well.   Michael Hingson  57:16 How can people find you? Can you? I assume, by your name, can you spell   Shilpa Alimchandani  57:20 Shilpa Alimchandani in LinkedIn, I'm the only one so you'll find me pretty easily there.   Michael Hingson  57:26 Why don't you spell that? If you would, please? Sure.   Shilpa Alimchandani  57:29 So Shilpa  S H I L, P as in Peter A. and Shilpa Alimchandani is A L I M as in Mary C H, A N as in Nancy, D as in David A. N as in Nancy. I. So it's a long one, but a phonetic name. In fact, on my website, I have a little button where you can click pronounce. And it tells you how to pronounce all, you know, with an audio clip of how you say the word book, The and also how you say my name Shilpa Alimchandani   Michael Hingson  58:02 Well, I hope people will reach out. Because I think you're you're talking about a lot of very valuable things. And I think we really need to look at inclusion and really create a new mindset. As I said, I have a speech called moving from diversity to inclusion. In fact, it's the second episode on our podcast. So if you haven't washed, I hope you'll go see it. There's my plug. And then my fourth episode is a speech that Dr. Jacobus tenBroek gave Dr. Tim brick was the founder of the National Federation of the Blind. And one of the foremost constitutional law scholars in the speech he gave at the 1956 convention, the National Federation of the Blind has called within the grace of God, and especially the last two paragraphs of that speech, I love but it's a great speech that I think, whether you're talking about blindness or any other kind of group, it applies. And he was definitely a visionary in the field, and was a was a great thinker about it. So that again, that's episode four, I hope that you and other people, if you haven't listened to it will go out and listen to   Shilpa Alimchandani  59:11 know Michael, I did listen to that, upon your recommendation that episode four and that speech was really moving and inspiring, and what I would say more than anything else, I felt that it was empowering. It was so empowering, and thank you for recommending that.   Michael Hingson  59:27 And he thought that he was being gentle with people in talking about discriminations and so on. In later years, he delivered another speech in 1967. Called are we up to the challenge? And he thought that he was much more forceful in that he started the speech by saying, and again, it's about blind people, but it could it goes across the board. He said mind people have the right to live in the world, which is interesting, but I still think is 1956 speeches was says best and I think there are others who agree with that.   Shilpa Alimchandani  1:00:02 Well, it's been such a pleasure speaking with you, Michael, thank you so much for inviting me on to the podcast.   Michael Hingson  1:00:07 Well, I am glad that you came and I hope that you will come back again and definitely anytime you have more insights or whatever or there's any way that we can be a resource for you, and I'm sure others will feel the same way. Please let us know. But Shilpa  I really appreciate you coming on and all of you I appreciate you listening today. So, we hope that you will give us a five star rating and that you will reach out. Let me know what you think of what we had to discuss. I love your thoughts. All of the information will be in our show notes, including how to spell Shilpa his name and we hope that you will let us know your thoughts. So once more Shilpa Thank you for listening, at least you declare you listen to thank you for being here. Thanks. Thank you all and we'll see you next time on unstoppable mindset.   Michael Hingson  1:01:00   You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Intelligent Speculation Podcast
#42: The Importance of Public Health

Intelligent Speculation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 78:52


In this episode, Patrick is speaking with Donna Bean about the importance of public health. They discuss: •How she came to find herself working in public health. •Higher education and the uniquely American problem of crippling student debt. •Her experience with the US Peace Corps. •Her experiences as a public health nurse in Alaska. •How her childhood experience of not fitting in has helped her to live all over the world. •Her career plans after her CDC fellowship. •How the pandemic has politicized public health. •And other topics. Donna Bean is a PHI/CDC Global Health Epidemiology Fellow working with CDC Dominican Republic in the Division of Global HIV/TB (DGHT) as well as in emergency preparedness efforts. Donna earned her BS in Nursing from the University of Miami's School of Nursing and Health Studies and her MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Arizona's Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. She has over a decade of experience in public health, with extensive experience in HIV/AIDS, TB, and COVID-19 control. Her career has been driven by a firm belief in individual and community's right to quality health care. You can find this episode on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/3ezRIik Also, don't forget about our book “Thinking Critically. From Fake News to Conspiracy Theories. Using Logic to Safely Navigate the Information Landscape” if you're interested in exploring how logic can be used to better help you to discern fact from fiction. The information landscape is perilous, but with the help of this book as your guide, you will always be able to find your way towards truth. It's available on Amazon today! Book: https://amzn.to/3nWdawV This show is supported and produced by Final Stretch Media. Final Stretch believes in creating something that disrupts attention spans and challenges the marketing status quo. They do this by creating high quality visual content that captivates your audience. You can find them on: Website: https://bit.ly/3AsP3wZ This show is also supported by QuikLee; the creators of Brain Racers. The world's first ever live racing competition for the brain. Download their app and play live on the weekends on an iOS device against the world. We have raced and it's a blast! App Download: https://apple.co/33n8aJs

International Real Estate Advisers w/ C Ray
New York Grown, Belize's Own Rachel Jensen Talks Tiny Homes On The Water and More

International Real Estate Advisers w/ C Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 31:44


Ms. Jensen joined the ECI Development/Teak Hardwoods team in 2012, starting as the organization's marketing intern at the administrative offices in Managua, Nicaragua.  At the end of her 3-month internship period, she had to make a decision between accepting a full-time position with ECI, or chasing her dreams in Panama with the US Peace Corps.  She ultimately chose ECI Development.  Today, Ms. Jensen is the Vice President of Sales & Marketing for ECI Development, a regional development company based throughout Latin America in Costa Rica, Belize, Panama and Nicaragua.  Ms. Jensen became a resident of Panama in 2016, and today calls San Pedro, Belize home.  She thoroughly enjoys the Latin American lifestyle and is a strong believer in being global. Ms. Jensen was invited to be a founding member of the Rotaract Club of Ambergris Caye and served as the club's Director of Professional Development.  Furthermore, Ms. Jensen was the co-founder a women's retreat, “5 Days to Freedom,” helping guide women towards financial, spiritual and international freedom.  She also sits on the board of the Belize National Association of Realtors.        Email: rjensen@ecidevelopment.com      Phone: Toll Free: +1 (800) 290-3028 | Belize: +501 226-4771                                                                      Website: www.ecidevelopment.comClick The Link Below if referred by this podcast episode and want to learn more:https://info.ecidevelopment.com/crg-chalmette-ray

International Real Estate Advisers w/ C Ray
Rachel Jensen Talks Approachable Investments In Teak Wood Farms and The Power of Legacy Investments

International Real Estate Advisers w/ C Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 40:16


Ms. Jensen joined the ECI Development/Teak Hardwoods team in 2012, starting as the organization's marketing intern at the administrative offices in Managua, Nicaragua.  At the end of her 3-month internship period, she had to make a decision between accepting a full-time position with ECI, or chasing her dreams in Panama with the US Peace Corps.  She ultimately chose ECI Development.  Today, Ms. Jensen is the Vice President of Sales & Marketing for ECI Development, a regional development company based throughout Latin America in Costa Rica, Belize, Panama and Nicaragua.  Ms. Jensen became a resident of Panama in 2016, and today calls San Pedro, Belize home.  She thoroughly enjoys the Latin American lifestyle and is a strong believer in being global. Ms. Jensen was invited to be a founding member of the Rotaract Club of Ambergris Caye and served as the club's Director of Professional Development.  Furthermore, Ms. Jensen was the co-founder a women's retreat, “5 Days to Freedom,” helping guide women towards financial, spiritual and international freedom.  She also sits on the board of the Belize National Association of Realtors.    Email: rjensen@ecidevelopment.com   Phone: Toll Free: +1 (800) 290-3028 | Belize: +501 226-4771                                                                      Website: www.ecidevelopment.com Click The Link Below if referred by this podcast episode and want to learn more:https://info.ecidevelopment.com/crg-chalmette-ray

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 178: Navigating the Hollywood Machine with Oscar® Winner Taylor Hackford

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 72:09


Sitting down with one of the big names in this business this week was a really cool opportunity. I am honored to have on the show today, Academy Award-winning director, producer, and screenwriter, Taylor Hackford. Taylor's has directed films like An Officer and a Gentleman (1982), White Nights (1985), Proof of Life (2000), Dolores Claiborne (1995), Against All Odds (1984), Parker (2013), the iconic Ray Charles biopic, Ray of 2004, and The Comedian (2016) just to name a few. He also has served as president of the Directors Guild of America and is married to the incomparable acting legend Helen Mirren. Long before gaining popularity, Hackford had an interesting journey on his climb-up.  Taylor served in the US Peace Corps in Bolivia after college. Before then, while pursuing his studies in law there was an odd turn of events. Inspired by mutual friends who were film students, Hackford, quit school and sought out an entry-level position with KCET TV in LA. There, he learned and grew. He did everything. From office assistance to investigative reporting, which earned him two Emmys and an Associated Press Award, to documentaries, short films, and directing. Hackford racked up his first hit directing and writing Teenage Father in 1978. The film won an Academy Award for Best Short Subject. It explores the life of a 17-year-old senior boy who is a soon-to-be father with his girlfriend, a 15-year-old sophomore. They evaluate the decisions about how they got here, and the decisions on what they will do next.He then went on to direct the very successful romantic drama film, Officer and a Gentleman in 1982. Recognized as the best film of the year and grossing $190 million from a $7 million budget. The film also made history at the Academy Awards where a black man, Louis Gossett Jr. won the Oscars for Best Supporting Actor for the first time in Academy history. The film tells the story of Zack Mayo (Gere), a United States Navy Aviation Officer Candidate who is beginning his training at Aviation Officer Candidate School. While Zack meets his first true girlfriend during his training, a young "townie" named Paula, he also comes into conflict with the hard-driving Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley training his class.Besides winning two Academy Awards, the film also won a BAFTA, two Golden Globes, one Grammy, one NAACP Image Awards, a Japan Academy Film Prize, National Board of Review 10 best films of the year awards, and a Writers Guild of America Awards.If this isn't every director's dream, I don't know what is. Of course, success like this sets the bar even higher for oneself and can make or break any filmmaker. Another of Taylor's classics is 1997 The Devil's Advocate starring Al Pacino, Keanu Reeves, Charlize Theron, Connie Nielsen, Craig T. Nelson, Judith IveyAn exceptionally adept Florida lawyer is offered a job to work in New York City for a high-end law firm with a high-end boss - the biggest opportunity of his career to date.Taylor Hackford delivered another outstanding film in 2004. Ray. The biographical musical film on the three decades journey of the legendary blues musician, Ray Charles---from his humble beginnings in the South, where he went blind at age seven, to his meteoric rise to stardom during the 1950s and 1960s. It starred triple threat actor, Jamie Foxx. Ray received riveting reviews from the critics and multiple awards including Best Actor at the Academy. Hackford's most recent work he produced or directed is The Comedian, starring Robert De Niro, Leslie Mann, Danny DeVito, and other big names. The film plot has Jackie (Robert De Niro) who is a comic icon, attempting to reinvent himself despite his audience only wanting to know him as a television character he played earlier in his career. It is a look at the life of an aging insult comic named Jack Burke.It was certainly incredible to sit back and chat with Taylor. His Ray Charles story alone is worth the process of admission, trust me. Enjoy my conversation with Taylor Hackford.

Life by Design not Default Podcast by 83/38 Collective
Ep: 51 - How to harness your intuition with Stephanie Zito. Life by Design not Default Podcast

Life by Design not Default Podcast by 83/38 Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 33:38


A highly regarded Intuitive Soul Purpose Coach, speaker and author, Stephanie Zito helps people across the globe discover and realize their best lives with both purpose and passion. In her role she's worked with personal clients and numerous corporations, including AT&T, Park Hyatt Hotels, US Peace Corps and Sesame Street Research, leading teambuilding, conflict resolution, and wellness programs. Additionally she's the founder and host of the podcast “This Passionate Life,” sharing her knowledge and insights on compassionate communication and finding your life's purpose. Connect with Stephanie: https://stephaniezito.com/ https://www.facebook.com/stephaniezitocoach/

Ikigai with Jennifer Shinkai
Re-release Episode 5: Dr Justin Sanders: Finding your Ikigai in Lifelong Learning

Ikigai with Jennifer Shinkai

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 55:48


In episode 5 Dr. Justin Sanders and I talk about the connection of lifelong learning to Ikigai, the 60 year curriculum, how it helps the brain, and how to approach study when there are almost too many options available. We also touch on how credentials can be a way to increase your impact in the world - not just about the skills you learn but the different doors that will be opened for you. If you are wondering if you are too old to go back to school, be inspired by the 92 year old at TUJ! If you enjoyed this episode and it inspired you in some way, we'd love to hear about it and know your biggest takeaway.  In this episode you'll hear: Why Dr Sanders is so passionate about education How he found his way to Temple University Japan  About the benefits of lifelong learning beyond just employment advantages Criteria you can use when deciding what kind of learning to engage in About Justin: Dr. Justin Sanders is the Director of Temple University Japan's Continuing Education Program, one of the oldest and largest providers of personal and professional development to Tokyo's international community. With over 15 years in the international and higher education sectors, before coming to Japan, he served as a Research Specialist and then Global Recognition Manager for the International Baccalaureate (IB), a leading global international education organization.  Prior, he spent several years supporting good governance in community colleges around the United States with the Association of Community College Trustees, and served a two-year tour as an education volunteer with the US Peace Corps, working in rural Azerbaijan. Justin received an undergraduate degree in Communications from the University of Arizona, an MA in Education and Human Development from the George Washington University, and a PhD in Education from the Graduate School of Human Sciences at Osaka University. His research focuses on international education and national development, institutional international strategy development, and adult learning. Connect with Justin: TUJ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TUJContinuingEd (https://www.facebook.com/TUJContinuingEd) TUJ Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/school/35437867 (https://www.linkedin.com/school/35437867) Justin's Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-sanders-2b386635/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-sanders-2b386635/) TUJ Website: https://www.tuj.ac.jp/cont-ed/index.html (https://www.tuj.ac.jp/cont-ed/index.html) Connect with Jennifer Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifershinkai/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifershinkai/)  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennifershinkaicoach (https://www.facebook.com/jennifershinkaicoach)  Website: https://jennifershinkai.com/ (https://jennifershinkai.com/ )

TTELT: Teaching Tips for English Language Teachers
S2 07.0 Student-Centered Teaching in Teacher-Centered Cultures with Kirsten Dyck

TTELT: Teaching Tips for English Language Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 24:23


Kirsten Dyck, who is currently teaching English at a university in Nanjing, China, has also taught in the Ukraine. She shares her expertise in culturally responsive teaching with engaging ways to encourage student participation and activities for overcoming fears of speaking in class. Dr. Kirsten Dyck teaches EFL at Nanjing Xiaozhuang University in Nanjing, China. She previously taught History and Humanities at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA (2012-2017) and EFL for the US Peace Corps at Poltava National V.G. Korolenko Pedagogical University in Poltava, Ukraine (2017-2019). She has held fellowships with the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Auschwitz Jewish Center, the Fulbright Commission, and the English Language Fellow Program. She is the author of Reichsrock: The International Web of White-Power and Neo-Nazi Hate Music (Rutgers University Press, 2017), as well as scholarly articles on genocide, racism, and music. She earned her PhD in American Studies from Washington State University (2012) and a TESOL Certificate from Toronto's Coventry House International (2005). --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ttelt/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ttelt/support

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.11.02

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.11.02. (Tuesday) News Briefing: President Moon Jae-in has officially declared that South Korea will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent from 2018 levels by 2030. Moon made the commitment on Monday in his keynote speech at the annual UN climate summit COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis: The 26th U.N. Climate Change Conference opened in Glasgow on Sunday, kicking off two weeks of intense diplomatic negotiations by around 200 countries on how to tackle global warming. But there has been much criticism about the summit’s impact, especially with leaders from China and Russia, staying away from the event. Meanwhile, South Korea has set ambitious Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs, but business sectors have expressed concerns of its possible negative economic consequences. To assess Korea’s goals and provide an overview of COP26, Professor Kim Jeong-in from the School of Economics at Chung-ang (중앙) University joins us on the line.the Korea Trending with Jung Ye-won: 1. Police have arrested a woman on charges of child abuse, after she was seen severely beating her 7 year-old son in broad daylight last month. (도로 한복판 7살 어린이 무차별 폭행…알고 보니 친엄마) 2. Concerns are growing that South Korea may run out of diesel exhaust fluid due to China’s decision to restrict its export. (중국발 '요소수' 품귀현상에 물류대란 우려…화물차 200만대 영향) 3. A 5 year-old girl who was tragically left with irreversible injuries to her brain after an accident, has gone on to save the lives of three other critically ill patients through organ donation. (키즈카페서 사고 뒤 뇌사 5세, 3명에게 장기 기증하고 하늘로) Touch Base in Seoul: One of the key figures behind the scenes that helped South Korea’s women’s curling team win their historic silver medal at the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics was Canadian coach Peter Gallant. He has now returned to try and help the team once again, first to qualify for Beijing 2022, and possibly help repeat their past Olympic success, or even go one step further. He joins us to talk about how the team is preparing, what brought him back, and the support he showed the team when they came forward with the abuse that they suffered under the former head coach and management. Morning Edition Preview with Antony Casey: - In tomorrow’s Korea Times, Jon Dunbar introduces a new book on the Gwangju Uprising by David Dolinger, who was a US Peace Corps volunteer at the time. - In tomorrow’s Korea Herald, Ko Jun-tae writes about the scourge of delivery motorcyclists in Seoul, and what businesses and authorities are doing about it.

Power Lunch Live
Interview with Rhett Power on American Real

Power Lunch Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:31


Rhett is an executive coach, Cast Member/Co-Captain of the TV series "4 Days to Save the World", and co-founder at Courageous Leadership, a leadership consultancy that helps you believe again. His second best-selling book, THE ENTREPRENEUR'S BOOK OF ACTIONS: Essential Daily Exercises and Habits for Becoming Wealthier, Smarter, and More Successful by McGraw Hill is a guide on how to become the leader you want to be. He is a regular contributor to Inc. Magazine, Forbes, and Thrive Global. Rhett travels the globe speaking about entrepreneurship and management alongside the likes of former Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann and AOL Founder Steve Case. He has been featured in the Huffington Post, Business Insider, The Hill, Time, The Wall Street Journal and CNN Money. He developed a love of teaching and service to others in the US Peace Corps.

Catch Flights Not Feelings Podcast
Is the Peace Corps Actually White Saviorism in Disguise?

Catch Flights Not Feelings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 62:44


This week we get really into racism, white saviorism, and privilege while talking all about Tiara's experience with the US Peace Corps. Frist, Tiara recounts her first-hand experience, which does include instances of sexual assault. She also tells us a wild story about being hit with a champagne bottle, held hostage, and hung up on by the US embassy! We also discuss all the positive experiences she had while doing her work with the Peace Corps and why the Peace Corps does what it does. Then we dive into white saviorism, what it is and how it's at play within the Peace Corps. We also digress into a tangent about colonization and racism within the US, the Peace Corps, and throughout the world. Lastly, Tiara leaves us with some wisdom about how you can join the Peace Corps and have a positive experience yourself and leave a positive impact on the places you are sent.  Follow us on Instagram: @catchflightsnotfeelingspodcast, @sofiasamarah and follow @tiaratribes Send us a listener submission telling us your travel stories, asking for advice, or giving a travel tip! hi@catchflightspodcast.com LINKS https://www.instagram.com/catchflightsnotfeelingspodcast/ https://www.instagram.com/sofiasamarah/ https://www.instagram.com/tiaratribes/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/387807898895527  

Keep Leading!™
KL119: Courageous Leadership

Keep Leading!™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 38:09


KL119 Rhett Power Co-Founder Courageous Leadership and Season 2 Cast Member/Co-Captain 4 Days to Save the World (TV Series) Courageous Leadership Episode Summary The world needs more courageous leaders! On Episode 119 of the Keep Leading!® podcast, Rhett Power, Co-Founder Courageous Leadership and Season 2 Cast Member on the 4 Days to Save the World TV Series explains how to develop courage as a leader and why it matters. Bio Rhett Power Best-Selling Author, Executive Coach, Columnist at Forbes, Season 2 of The Social Movement (TV Series) Rhett Power co-founded Wild Creations in 2007 and quickly built the startup toy company into the 2010 Fastest Growing Business in South Carolina. Wild Creations was awarded a Blue-Ribbon Top 75 US Company by the US Chamber of Commerce and one of Inc. Magazine's 500 Fastest-Growing US Companies. He and his team won over 40 national awards for their innovative toys. He was a finalist for Ernst and Young's Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2011 and was nominated again in 2012. He was named one of the world's top 100 business bloggers and, in 2018, was named the Best Small Business Coach in the United States. In 2019 he joined the prestigious Marshall Goldsmith's 100 Coaches and was named the #1 Thought Leader on Entrepreneurship by Thinkers360. He is a Fellow at The Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School affiliate. Rhett is a Co-founder at Courageous Leadership, a leadership consultancy that helps you find your courage. Courageous Leadership is an amalgamation of experienced behavior scientists, entrepreneurs, best-selling authors, and breakthrough story makers who have worked with and helped grow some of the largest, most relevant brands on the planet, including Google, Snapchat, Major League Baseball, General Mills, Nestle, Qualcomm, and others. His second best-selling book, THE ENTREPRENEUR'S BOOK OF ACTIONS: Essential Daily Exercises and Habits for Becoming Wealthier, Smarter, and More Successful by McGraw Hill, is a guide to becoming the leader you want to be. He is a regular contributor to Inc. Magazine, Forbes, and Thrive Global. Rhett travels the globe speaking about entrepreneurship and management alongside former Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann and AOL Founder Steve Case. He has been featured in the Huffington Post, Business Insider, The Hill, Time, The Wall Street Journal, and CNN Money. He developed a love of teaching and service to others in the US Peace Corps. Website https://rhettpower.com/ Other Website https://courageous.io/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/rhettpower/ Twitter https://twitter.com/rhettpower   Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rhettspower   Instagram https://www.instagram.com/rhettpower/   Leadership Quote What got you here won't get you there. --Marshall Goldsmith Get Your Copy of Rhett's Books! https://rhettpower.com/books Subscribe, share and review on Apple Podcasts! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/keep-leading/id1461490512 Full Episode Transcripts and Detailed Guest Information www.KeepLeadingPodcast.com   Keep Leading LIVE (Live Recordings of the Keep Leading!® Podcast) www.KeepLeadingLive.com The Keep Leading!® podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques, and insights. For more information visit https://eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Warrior Soul Podcast
Baktash Ahadi: Tragedy in Afghanistan

The Warrior Soul Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 40:41


Baktash Ahadi was born in Afghanistan and raised in the United States. After college, he joined the US Peace Corps and went to Mozambique. As the US war in Afghanistan ramped up, Baktash decided to return to Afghanistan as an interpreter who worked alongside the US Marines.  In this episode, Baktash and I discuss the tragedy in Afghanistan and what led to it. We discuss the bureaucratic system, and lack of incentive to ever actually get anything done. We also discuss the repercussions of what this means for the Afghan people, and for American Veterans.  To learn more about Baktash Ahadi: https://www.baktashahadi.com/ To follow Baktash on Twitter: https://twitter.com/baktashahadi  

Global Connections Television Podcast
Jennifer Jones: President Elect of Rotary International-2022

Global Connections Television Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 26:51


Jennifer Jones, who will be the first woman president of Rotary International in 2022, discusses key programs pertaining to diversity, peace, and the environment, and highlights the importance of partnerships, such as with the United Nations, US Peace Corps, the CDC and Partnering for Peace, especially on major programs such as Polioplus.

How to Talk to Anyone by Leil Lowndes | Book Summary and Analysis | Free Audiobook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 17:30


Get the audiobook for free on Amazon: https://geni.us/leil-free-audiobook Leil Lowndes' Perspectivehttps://geni.us/leil-lowndes (Leil Lowndes) is an internationally recognized communications expert. She has conducted communication seminars for major US corporations, foreign governments, and the US Peace Corps. Lowndes has appeared on hundreds of television and radio programs. She has authored ten bestselling books on communications. These books have been published in over 26 foreign languages. Introduction https://geni.us/leil-free-audiobook (How to Talk to Anyone) is a psychology-backed book that offers guidance on effective communication. Lowndes covers a wide range of communication types, broken down into verbal and nonverbal, across almost every possible context. Your approach should adapt depending on who you are talking to and the specific context. So, How to Talk to Anyone offers guidance on how you can become a master communicator. As a master communicator, you can connect with others irrespective of the environment. StoryShot #1: Using Your Smile and Your Eyes for First Impressions 80% of first impressions is the way you look and move. In fact, studies suggest that emotional reactions occur in our brains before we even have time to register a reaction to somebody. So, try to utilize Leil Lowndes' tips to intrigue everyone through your first impressions. Lowndes advises against quick smiles. If you interact with somebody, you should start by looking at their face for a second and pausing. This pause will let you soak in their persona. You should then let out a big warm smile that floods across your face. Allow this flood to overflow into smiling with your eyes. While engaging with the flooding smile, you should also try to maintain eye contact. Others will respect you more if you maintain strong eye contact. Specifically, this ability is associated with intelligence and abstract thinking. Lowndes' second technique builds on the importance of maintaining eye contact. She describes how you should adopt sticky eyes. This means you should not break eye contact even after they have finished speaking. Once you have decided to break eye contact, you should do so slowly and reluctantly. Lowndes believes this approach will send a message to others to comprehend their conversation and respect them as an individual. When you are seeking romance, you should utilize what Lowndes describes as epoxy eyes. If you are romantically interested in someone, maintain deep eye contact with them even when they are not the person talking. If they are interested in you, keeping eye contact while they are a listener can be an effective aphrodisiac. StoryShot #2: How to Excel at Small Talk Try not to worry too much about what you are saying, but attempt to match the mood of the audience. The easiest, broader approach to take is simply ensuring your words will put people at ease. Doing this will help make you sound passionate. As long as your words are putting the audience at ease, you can focus more on the tone of what you are saying. 80% of your communication has nothing to do with your choice of words.  When introducing people, you should always offer an exciting point for the conversation to flow from. Offering an unbaited hook when starting a conversation will only lead to awkwardness. A word detective can identify their conversation partner's preferred topic by listening to every word said. You will become more appealing in others' minds if you learn how to keep the spotlight shining on them.

More In Common Podcast
James H. Lowry /// A Cause Worth the Fight /// Season5:E125

More In Common Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 62:45


What do you fight for?      Movements, religion, and love are a few of the many things people spend their lives fighting for.   When you find a cause or life purpose that ignites a burning passion within you, you will forever be destined to fight all your life to keep it alive and known.   A successful businessman, author, and our guest Jim Lowry embodies what it means to fight for that passion. For Jim, the burning passion is the desire to boost economic development and create wealth in minority communities.   In his book, he uses his life story and experiences to convey the advancements that are achieved through the analysis of history and willingness to learn. His life's work is a blueprint for future generations who are willing to ignite that same fire.    So, what will you fight for?      “Be diplomatic but be honest”-  James H.  Lowry     James H. Lowry is a business icon, sought after speaker, strategic advisor and nationally recognized workforce and supplier diversity expert and pioneer. Lowry was the first African American consultant for global consulting firm McKinsey & Company in 1968. Later, he became the first African American senior partner at the prestigious Boston Consulting Group, where he led the firm’s workforce diversity, ethnic marketing and minority business development consulting practice. Lowry continues to serve as a senior advisor to BCG, while heading his own private consulting firm, James H. Lowry & Associates.   In early 1960’s, Lowry was an associate director with the US Peace Corps, stationed in Lima, Peru, where he met Senator Robert F. Kennedy who recruited him to be a staffer at the new Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation in Brooklyn. While there, he, along with Bed-Stuy resident and actress Roxie Roker, co-hosted the pioneering television show Inside Bedford-Stuyvesant, New York City’s first program written, produced and presented by blacks at a time when blacks were largely invisible on television, or seen only in news footage about riots, protests or crime. In 1985, Lowry also co-hosted the groundbreaking television show MBR: The Minority Business Report.   In addition to his entrepreneurial endeavors, Lowry is a teacher, mentor and leader across sectors.   Lowry encapsulated his 30 plus years of experience in the field of minority business development in the book he co-authored in 2011, Minority Business Success: Refocusing on the American Dream. His new book, Change Agent: A Life Dedicated to Creating Wealth for Minorities, is an intimate memoir that demonstrates the power of iconic mentors and pivotal opportunities leveraged across the globe, and offers solutions to the ever-widening wealth gap that plagues black and brown communities today.    Topics we discuss:   Characterize success  Relationship with money   History of the Black community   Capitalism seems to perpetuate a scarcity mindset.  Big billionaires should flood money into black communities to help.    Importance of building a black partner ecosystem.  Reliance on the government.   Compassion  References:  Think and Grow Rich - Napoleon Hill  Change Agent - His Book  Francis Parker School - outside Chicago   Embryonic Democracy   PBS Documentary on the black church Produced by John Legend  Crab in the Barrel analogy  Lincoln's history of ending Slavery.  Dr. Grant's Episode  Pel Grants   John Thompson - Board of IBM/Microsoft  LBJ Quote   Illinois Reparations  Approval of Reparations in Reconstructions   Kent "Lock West" Episode with M.I.C.     Credits:  Lead editor + Producer: Ruf Holmes     Music:  Main Theme: "Eaze Does It" by Shye Eaze and DJ Rufbeats, a More In Common Podcast Exclusive.  All music created by DJ Rufbeats 

Available Worldwide
Angie Collins of Empowered Parents Empowering Daughters

Available Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 35:30


Join us as we chat with Angie Collins about how she's come to embrace being an entrepreneur, and how she's found a less "fuzzy" side of coaching. Angie is a PCI certified Parent Coach® and the founder of Empowered Parents Empowering Daughters.In her signature one-on-one coaching programs and her small group virtual parent support circles, Angie works with busy moms to create systems to organize their space, routines to organize their time, and intentions to connect with their daughters so they can feel more productive, yell less, and experience fewer power struggles.As a mother to three girls, Angie understands the challenges that parents face as well as the immense joy that raising girls can bring. Her interest in coaching parents comes not only from her ability to relate to parents' struggles but also from her educational background. Angie has an undergraduate degree in elementary education and a Master's in education from Tufts University. She taught elementary school for several years and was a Preschool Teacher Trainer with the US Peace Corps in Cape Verde.

Armed & Ready
Kevin Welch - Tracking a Pandemic in Real Time

Armed & Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 39:05


We have Kevin Welch on this week's episode, which also happens to be our producer`s brother. Kevin has an impressive story to share, having previously served in the US Peace Corps and now specializing in epidemiology. Kevin is a public health doctor, who, ironically, graduated right before the Covid-19 pandemic, now working in global health and investing in real estate. During his graduate education, he served in the US Peace Corps in Malawi where he was involved in Ebola prevention with the WHO. Like being a public health doctor was not enough, Kevin also invest in real estate and gives us advice on how to start making a passive income. Make sure you tune in! 

Interchain.FM
Sentinel dVPN: Why decentralized VPN matters for dWeb

Interchain.FM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 48:50


About Sentinel:Sentinel is decentralized VPN (dVPN) project. It is a peer to peer bandwidth marketplace: Anyone can offer bandwidth to the network and earn income doing so. And anyone can use that bandwidth from a dVPN application. Sentinel is Cosmos-based is a Web 3.0 infrastructure layer focused on privacy and security. Any company or individual can build their own custom decentralized VPN on top of the Sentinel network.About Chjango Unchained:Chjango started Interchain.FM to fill the cross-chain interoperability niche, as the wider narrative was being discovered. Find her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/chjangoAbout Dan Edlebeck:For the past four years, Dan has been running around in blockchain. He led crypto marketing at Blockparty and founded deedle connects, bringing three blockchain projects to market and helped build four cryptocurrency communities. Prior, Dan led nonprofits in their growth at  Cara Chicago and while serving in the US Peace Corps. He's a proud Badger (BBA at UW-Madison) and Beaver (MBA at Babson College).

Ikigai with Jennifer Shinkai
Episode 5: Dr Justin Sanders: Finding your Ikigai in Lifelong Learning

Ikigai with Jennifer Shinkai

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2021 55:48


In episode 5 Dr. Justin Sanders and I talk about the connection of lifelong learning to Ikigai, the 60 year curriculum how it helps the brain, how to approach study when there are almost too many options available. We also touch on how credentials can be away to increase your impact in the world - not just about the skills you learn but the different doors that will be opened for you. If you are wondering if you are too old to go back to school be inspired by the 92 year old at TUJ! Bio Dr. Justin Sanders is the Director of Temple University Japan's Continuing Education Program, one of the oldest and largest providers of personal and professional development to Tokyo's international community. With over 15 years in the international and higher education sectors, before coming to Japan, he served as a Research Specialist and then Global Recognition Manager for the International Baccalaureate (IB), a leading global international education organization. Prior, he spent several years supporting good governance in community colleges around the United States with the Association of Community College Trustees, and served a two-year tour as an education volunteer with the US Peace Corps, working in rural Azerbaijan. Justin received an undergraduate degree in Communications from the University of Arizona, an MA in Education and Human Development from the George Washington University, and a PhD in Education from the Graduate School of Human Sciences at Osaka University. His research focuses on international education and national development, institutional international strategy development, and adult learning. Links https://www.facebook.com/TUJContinuingEd (https://www.facebook.com/TUJContinuingEd) https://www.linkedin.com/school/35437867 (https://www.linkedin.com/school/35437867) https://www.tuj.ac.jp/cont-ed/index.html (https://www.tuj.ac.jp/cont-ed/index.html) https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-sanders-2b386635/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-sanders-2b386635/)

Mscs Media
ANDREW BUSTAMANTE - CIA AGENT - SPY - NUCLEAR MISSILE OFFICER - EVERYDAYSPY - MSCS MEDIA #68

Mscs Media

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 191:19


Full Video Interview: https://youtu.be/dMDFPgrM9CsAndrew Bustamante is a former covert CIA intelligence officer, decorated military combat veteran, and successful Fortune 10 corporate advisor. After 20 years leading human and technical intelligence operations for corporate and government clients, Andrew founded EverydaySpy.com - the first-ever online platform designed to teach elite spy skills to everyday people. Featured in both US and International media, Andrew’s training content has been praised for its innovative, authentic, and life-changing impact. When he isn’t giving interviews, running spy exercises, or supporting private intelligence contracts around the world, Andrew lives with his wife (also an ex-CIA Officer) and two children in Florida.Gernal background/talking points:- Raised in rural Pennsylvania, left for college on full-ride scholarship (US Air Force Academy)- 5 years as an Nuclear Missile officer in the US Air Force- Recruited into CIA after applying to the US Peace Corps- 7 years living/working undercover with CIA's Directorate of Operations (aka: National Clandestine Service)- Background in Asian languages: Chinese, Thai, Japanese- Traveled through 18 countries and 6 continents with more every year!- Married to an ex-CIA covert officer with 2 young kids (8/boy, 3/girl)- Host of top 100 iTunes podcast 'Everyday Espionage Podcast'- Free spy training game at EverydaySpy.com/OperationsCheck Out Andrew: https://andrewbustamante.org/EverydaySpy.comEverydaySpy.com/Operationshttps://www.instagram.com/everydayspy/?hl=enhttps://twitter.com/everydayspy?lang=enhttps://www.facebook.com/EverydaySpy/https://www.youtube.com/everydayspyhttps://toppodcast.com/podcast_feeds/everyday-espionage-podcast/https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/everyday-espionage-podcast/id1441789630

Global Connections Television Podcast
Alana DeJoseph: Importance of US Peace Corps

Global Connections Television Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2021 25:48


Alana DeJoseph, Producer and Director of “A Towering Task: A Peace Corps Documentary,” focuses on the importance of the United States Peace Corps, many of its humanitarian and educational programs, unique situations confronting thousands of American Peace Corps Volunteers working in over sixty-economically developing countries and challenges in producing a documentary to showcase the US Peace Corps.

Change Work Life
How to adapt during a global crisis - with Ray Blakney of Live Lingua

Change Work Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2020 46:18 Transcription Available


#067 - Serial entrepreneur Ray Blakney explains how the 2009 swine flu crisis forced him to adapt his business and how his experience can help us navigate the coronavirus pandemic.What you'll learn[01:18] Ray introduces himself and explains current projects.[06:16] What to do when you realise early in your career that you are on a path not suited to you, even if you’re in a well-paid comfortable job.[07:50] How to find out whether there’s an alternative for you to the 9-5 job.[09:20] How joining the US Peace Corps enabled Ray to learn about other cultures and make lives better.[10:08] How to get off the hamster wheel and why a worst-case scenario might not be that bad. [12:19] What the early stages of starting a business looked like for Ray.[15:50] Search engine optimisation (SEO) – what it is and how it helps people to find you.[19:38] How Mexican swine flu and a ban on foreign travel forced Ray to adapt his business.[21:10] How many entrepreneurs start their businesses by identifying a need which no-one else is addressing.[22:47] Why starting small and avoiding external investment can help you establish a sustainable business which meets your needs.[25:36] Why you shouldn’t limit yourself to your existing market or customers if you want to adapt to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.[26:34] How to expand your offering and serve more people online.[28:40] The value of having diverse multiple sources of income.[32:00] How to start by identifying and researching a need for a business to satisfy.[41:50] How not to be intimidated by the success of others and define your own success.For the show notes for this episode, including a full transcript and links to all the resources mentioned, visit:https://changeworklife.com/how-to-adapt-during-a-global-crisis/Re-assessing your career? Know you need a change but don't really know where to start? Check out these two exercises to start the journey of working out what career is right for you!Take me to the exercises!Also, make sure to join the Change Work Life Facebook group and check out all the resources mentioned by our guests on the Change Work Life Resources page.Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey
#24 - Adam Herman

TRENDIFIER with Julian Dorey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2020 137:50


Adam Herman is a member of the US Peace Corps. From 2018 - 2020, he lived in the Koba-Tatema Village of Guinea, West Africa—where he taught 7th - 10th grade Guinean students and designed, organized, and brought to life the first school computer lab across the entire sub-prefecture. For more information on the Peace Corps and its history, visit this page: https://www.peacecorps.gov/about/history/  ***TIME STAMPS*** 2:34 - Adam’s backstory; Joining the Peace Corps; How he landed in Guinea, West Africa 9:54 - The 3 Goals of The US Peace Corps; Government funding for the Agency 13:51 - Adam explains “Selfless vs. Selfish” in joining The Peace Corps; Lifelong bond of Peace Corps Volunteers 21:58 - Adam breaks down the Peace Corps’ presence in Guinea; Guinea’s Capital, Conakry; Adam’s Orientation and first host family; Guinean languages and the language barrier struggle Adam encountered early on 34:36 - Food, Shelter, & Plumbing in Guina; Adam describes the rude awakening of his first months in Dubreka 38:41 - Adam recounts the Peace Corps training program in Dubreka, his assignment to the village of Koba-Tatema, and the teaching curriculum he had to learn; Adam’s integration into his new host family, community, and the bigger challenges his second Guinean home presented 46:39 - “Happiness” among the Guinean people; The industries & economy of Guinea 50:43 - Background on Adam’s early teaching and the challenges he faced (most notably the cultural norms around student discipline) 1:01:05 - When Adam learned about Covid-19; The chaos of the emergency evacuation of all Peace Corps volunteers worldwide when the Pandemic began; Adam’s emotions leaving Guinea unexpectedly 1:10:39 - Adam’s gives a few details about his project building the first computer lab ever in a school in Koba; Electricity in Guinea 1:15:47 - iPhone, Cell Phone, Laptop, & Internet use in Guinea; Adam explains the rest of the details on his project, including the funding process, the corruption of the government officials he worked with, and the near failure of the entire thing because of Covid and the aforementioned corruption that impacted the project’s funding 1:33:10 - Adam talks about the quiet of spending so much time alone in a 3rd world country; Thinking of America 1:38:28 - Adam describes the difficulty of his reintegration into America; What came of the project he left behind 1:44:01 - The political tension in Guinea surrounding the 2020 Guinean Presidential Election and the Constitutional Crisis that has followed (Incumbent President Alpha Conde vs. Challenger Cellou Diallo); The Susu (Sousou), Malinke, and Pulaar tribes of Guinea; Guinea Politics and Democracy 1:52:50 - Adam’s perspective on America’s Democracy & political process compared to Guinea’s; The resignation/defeat Guineans feel in their reality; Hope & The American Dream; Adam recounts a story of his host sister’s tragic death from a highly preventable disease 2:00:13 - Adam’s bond with the Guinean culture; Bringing the communal aspects of Guinea to American culture; The downside effects of technological advancement; How phones and tech make us feel more alone; Adam explains the cultural barriers that still existed between him and the Guinean people at the time he left 2:07:55 - Being White in a Black country; Adjusting to what was already pre-Covid a less-than-communal country in America; The loss of communication and emotion in the Pandemic mask culture 2:12:06 - Adam’s reflections on his time in Guinea; Empathy ~ YouTube FULL EPISODES: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0A-v_DL-h76F75xik8h03Q  ~ Show Notes: https://www.trendifier.com/podcastnotes  TRENDIFIER Website: https://www.trendifier.com  Julian's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianddorey  ~ Beat provided by: https://freebeats.io  Music Produced by White Hot

Morbidity and Mortality Podcast
Morbidity & Mortality Podcast Episode 26 w/Dr. Patrick Tschida

Morbidity and Mortality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 78:34


I have an alumni of the University of Minnesota - School of Public Health, and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. An experienced qualitative and quantitative researcher with interests in maternal, infant, and early childhood health and nutrition, HIV/AIDS prevention programs, and demanding solutions to global healthcare disparities. He has supervised hundreds of PhD candidates. A peer-reviewer for Social Science & Medicine (SMM), the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB), and the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development (JAFSCD). He serves as a contributing faculty member with the Walden College of Health Sciences (since January, 2011), and as an adjunct contributing faculty member at 4 other land-grant institutions (U of Hawaii, U of North Dakota, University of MN, University of Guam). It is my privilege to welcome this Fulbright Scholar and US Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania, Dr. Patrick Tschida to our podcast

The Teacher Entrepreneur
TE 001: Running a tuition business with Ray Blakney

The Teacher Entrepreneur

Play Episode Play 31 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 1, 2020 24:49


In this episode, Co-Founder and CEO of Live Lingua, Ray Blakney, talks about teaching online.Ray is an award-winning serial entrepreneur, having bootstrapped multiple 7-figure businesses all across the globe. In 2006, he joined the US Peace Corps and was assigned to Chiapas, Mexico, where he met his wife. In 2008, after completing his Peace Corps service, he launched Live Lingua, an online immersive language school, to complement their in-person classes. By 2010, he took the decision to sell his brick and mortar business and take Live Lingua online full-time. Ray has featured in several major publications including The Boston Globe, Entrepreneur Magazine, and Forbes, to name a few.What are the advantages of having an online business? Should teachers choose an existing platform or create their own? Ray tells us about his free content, he gives some advice for aspiring teachers who don't know where to start, and he talks about sponsoring children's education, all on this episode of Teacher Entrepreneur. Topics Discussed·        [03:21] How did the Swine Flu outbreak affect his brick and mortar business?·        [04:58] Advantages of having an online business·        [08:52] Why giveaway so much free educational content?·        [11:14] Save The Children·        [13:00] Teaching online·        [15:16] Advice for teachers·        [17:16] Onmatu.com·        [18:49] Choosing vs creating a teaching platform·        [21:16] Where to start·        [22:43] Final Words of Wisdom Relevant LinksWebsite:      https://www.livelingua.com                         https://rayblakney.com                      https://podcasthawk.com                      https://www.onmatu.com Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-anomalous-educator-podcast/id1476777256 Email:              ray@livelingua.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/raymond.blakney Twitter: https://twitter.com/rayblakney LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/raymondblakney YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmLf3aWe9xdPAFPwJiLyr6w 

Drinking With Authors
Episode 76 Literary Briefs Rob Fisher

Drinking With Authors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 29:13


Rob Fisher is a soccer scout and writer. Born and raised in North Carolina, he graduated fromGuilford College and went on to serve three years in the US Peace Corps. Posted in Eswatini, heused soccer as an instrument to teach about HIV/AIDS and worked at the youth and professionallevel. He coached a rural high school to two conference titles, one regional championship, and anational semifinal. Shortly after, he began scouting professionally in the United States andreleased his first e-book, RF Volume I: The Opposition Scouting Portfolio. He’s currentlystarting a nonprofit that discovers players in marginalized talent territories, and he was inspiredby his time abroad.His writing is brave, original, and nonconforming. He believes in equal opportunity and doingwhat you love.Follow Rob and Buy his books!Website: www.meetrobfisher.comAmazon: amazon.com/author/rob_fisherInstagram: @rfisher451Follow us!Follow us on social media:Twitter: @DrinkWAuthorsInstagram: DrinkingwithAuthorsCall us or email us with questions or inquiries!Email: DrinkingWithAuthors@gmail.comPhone: (727) 300-6752New episodes weekly!

Drinking With Authors
Episode 75 Rob Fisher

Drinking With Authors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2020 53:16


Rob Fisher is a soccer scout and writer. Born and raised in North Carolina, he graduated fromGuilford College and went on to serve three years in the US Peace Corps. Posted in Eswatini, heused soccer as an instrument to teach about HIV/AIDS and worked at the youth and professionallevel. He coached a rural high school to two conference titles, one regional championship, and anational semifinal. Shortly after, he began scouting professionally in the United States andreleased his first e-book, RF Volume I: The Opposition Scouting Portfolio. He’s currentlystarting a nonprofit that discovers players in marginalized talent territories, and he was inspiredby his time abroad.His writing is brave, original, and nonconforming. He believes in equal opportunity and doingwhat you love.Follow Rob and Buy his books!Website: www.meetrobfisher.comAmazon: amazon.com/author/rob_fisherInstagram: @rfisher451Follow us!Follow us on social media:Twitter: @DrinkWAuthorsInstagram: DrinkingwithAuthorsCall us or email us with questions or inquiries!Email: DrinkingWithAuthors@gmail.comPhone: (727) 300-6752New episodes weekly!

NanaOS Podcast
NanaOS Podcast | Helping Support African Development | Morgan from Morgan Through a Lens

NanaOS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 30:20


Have you ever thought about who is behind the wheel of helping Africa develop?   This week I sat down with Morgan who left the United States in order to do that, aid in Africa's development.   Morgan joined the US Peace Corps in 2015 and headed to South-Africa to pursue a calling that she had; to help others. She gives insight into some of the challenges that we have as a continent as well as some ways in which we can move forward.    Check out her Blog as well as all of her social media handles to find out more, especially if you want to know more about joining the Peace Corps.   Travel Blog: https://www.morganthroughalens.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAGaqnGMpqLYnX35D6bYdhA Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/morganthroughalens/ Pinterest: https://nl.pinterest.com/morganthroughalens/_created/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/morganthroughalens

The Unforgiving60
@RV19- On Beth Eggleston, Dr Linda Monshizadeh, Kim Martens & More on the SAS Selection Course

The Unforgiving60

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2020 70:07


In this episode, Ben and Tim reminisce about recent chats with some incredible guests, including humanitarian Beth Eggleston, plastic surgeon Linda Monshizadeh and security guru Kim Martens.  And following those three amazing ladies, they bring another amazing lady, Monika Georgieva, back into the studio to ask some additional questions about the infamous SAS Selection Course, including the highs and lows, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and self-doubt.  And finally, a whole bunch of outstanding emails, questions and feedback from listeners.   As always, please let us know what you think!  Good, bad or indifferent, we'd love to hear from you – email debrief@unforgiving60.com.   Intelligence Summary (INTSUM) 01:45          Reflections on Beth Eggleston, including the stereotypical views of soldiers and humanitarians in a war zone. 04:15          List of famous US Peace Corps alumni 05:25          Reflections on Dr Linda; Ben reveals his preconceptions on plastic surgery going into the episode – and how it changed! 07:00          David Gillespie's Teen Brain – great read, albeit super scary if you have teenage children! 08:49          Parallels with our recent chat with Steve Biddulph 10:30          Linda's art.  Far too talented… 11:40          Reflections on Kim Martens.  Starting with the benefits of starting your professional career at a fast food joint 12:35          Out of the Western Australian Police Force…..and into Iraq! 13:45          Ben's profound reflections on the IED threat – ‘it was messed up!' 14:30          Ben and Tim reflect on humankind's darker side, including through the lens of Eddie Jaku's amazing book The Happiest Man on Earth 16:00          The nature of evil – and how it might not be that far away from many people in society 17:44          Tim's switching speed – akin to an aircraft carrier turning around 18:07          Cat's in the Cradle – still brings a tear to Ben's eye 19:30          Ben and Kim's shared passion of lapping in V8s 20:30          ‘Undue noise due to method of operation' – Ben's first traffic infringement.  Is this still a thing?  Let us know – debrief@unforgiving60.com 21:30          Listener feedback  - plus Ben and Tim trying to work out which of the ‘social medias' they are on 23:00          Tegere Outdoors –  veteran owned company doing fantastic outdoor gear, including space-age facial mask! 24:45          Coffee Cannon crowdfunding campaign – get behind it! 28:00          Unforgiving60 reading list.  Coming soon.  We think. 30:00          Back by popular demand – Monika Georgieva!  Live in the studio 31:00          Only weirdos enjoy the SAS selection course 31:30          Mon's best bit on selection 34:22          Mon's lowest point on selection 38:00          Ben's lowest point on selection.  Involving chickens 40:50          Physical and mental preparedness 43:15          Tim's physical training journal.  Not a weighty tome 45:30          Specialisation. It's for insects. 46:40          Life lessons from the selection course 48:30          Intrinsic and extrinsic motivators – finding the right balance 55:30          Life imitating art – Ben's selection course-like experience on operations in Afghanistan 1:03:15       An email from Pucka!  With some great reflections on creating a safe-to-fail environment in training   External Links Tegere – Gear for your Soul The Coffee Cannon Pod Pistol: Magazine Fed, Bolt Action caffeine.  Support it through its crowdfunding campaign Kev Toonen – trainer at 98 Gym, and host of the 98 Gym Podcast   Music The Externals … Available on Spotify  

The Richie Norton Show
Rhett Power — The Entrepreneur's Competitive Advantage in Chaos

The Richie Norton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2020 40:03


#55 Richie Norton interviews Rhett Power on entrepreneurship, leadership amidst chaos, creating a life of freedom and meaning with family, living around the world and finding your own entrepreneur's competitive advantage. Powerful, empowering conversation. Rhett co-founded Wild Creations in 2007 and quickly built the startup toy company into the 2010 Fastest Growing Business in South Carolina. Wild Creations was awarded a Blue-Ribbon Top 75 US Company by the US Chamber of Commerce and one of Inc. Magazine's 500 Fastest Growing US Companies. He and his team won over 40 national awards for their innovative toys. He was a finalist for Ernst and Young's Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2011 and was nominated again in 2012. After a successful exit from the toy company he started a new company focused on startup success. Recently he was named one of the world's top 100 business bloggers and in 2018 named the Best Small Business Coach in the United States. In 2019 he joined the prestigious Marshall Goldsmith's 100 Coaches and was named the #1 Thought Leader on Entrepreneurship by Thinkers360. His second best-selling book THE ENTREPRENEUR'S BOOK OF ACTIONS: Essential Daily Exercises and Habits for Becoming Wealthier, Smarter, and More Successful by McGraw Hill is a guide on how to become the leader you want to be. He is a regular contributor to Inc. Magazine, Forbes, and Thrive Global. Rhett travels the globe speaking about entrepreneurship, and management alongside the likes of Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann and AOL Founder Steve Case. He has been featured in the Huffington Post, Business Insider, The Hill, Time, The Wall Street Journal and CNN Money. He developed a love of teaching and service to others in the US Peace Corps. Rhett is a Co-founder at Courageous Leadership a leadership consultancy that helps you believe again. We're an amalgamation of experienced behavior scientists, entrepreneurs, best-selling authors and breakthrough story makers who have worked with and inspired some of the largest, most relevant brands on the planet, including Google, Snapchat, Major League Baseball, General Mills, Nestle, Qualcomm and others.  Go to https://rhettpower.com/ to follow Rhett's latest. Continue the conversation here: RICHIE NORTON SHOW COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/richiepodcast RICHIE NORTON SHOW NOTES AND RESOURCES: http://www.richienorton.com/ RICHIE NORTON SOCIAL: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/richie_norton LINKEDIN: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardnorton FB: https://www.facebook.com/richienorton TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/richienorton

Passion Harvest
FACING FEAR: The Economic Hit Man touches the Jaguar with John Perkins

Passion Harvest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2020 49:20


John Perkins is on a crusade to Transform Fear into Action to change your life and the World. John’s experience as an “economic hit man”, convinced developing countries to build huge infrastructure projects that put them in debt to the World Bank and other US-controlled institutions. Although he had been taught this was the best model for economic development, John came to see that this was simply a new form of colonialism. He now an ambassador to transform our failing Death Economy into a Life Economy. John’s latest book, Touching the Jaguar: Transforming Fear into Action to Change Your Life and the World, tells the dramatic story of how, when he was a Peace Corps volunteer, his life was saved by an Amazonian shaman who taught him to “touch the jaguar,” to change his reality by embracing perceptions that transformed fears into positive actions. This is a quote from the book, “‘Touching the jaguar’ means that you can identify your fears and barriers, confront them, alter your perceptions about them, accept their energy, and take actions to change yourself and the world.” John Perkins was chief economist at a major consulting firm. John has advised the World Bank, United Nations, Fortune 500 corporations, US and other governments and is the author of 10 books including, New York Times bestseller Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. The book has sold over 2 million copies and has been published in 35 languages. John regularly speaks at universities, economic forums, and shamanic gatherings around the world and is a founder and board member of the non-profit organizations, the Pachamama Alliance and Dream Change. This is his story, and this is his passion. PASSIONATE DISCUSSIONS ABOUT - Working with the US Peace Corps in Ecuador - Training with Shamans - Corporatocracy - The perception between perceived and objective reality - Facing Fear - Life as an EHM (Economic Hit Man) - The Death Economy – self destructive unsustainable system - How to transform to a ‘Life Economy’ – renewable and regenerative - American Globalisation - Corporate colonialism and Corporatocracy - Collective and individual change - Touching the Jaguar – moving through and confronting our fear - Shape shifting - How do we get to know ourselves? Who am I? - Prophecy of the Eagle and the Condor, the Mayan Prophecy of 2012, and the Legend of Etsaa and the Evias - Life in the jungle of Guatemala - Redemption – can we be redeemed for our wrong doings? - 5 Questions to ask yourself to touch the Jaguar QUOTES FROM THE BOOK: Touching the Jaguar: Transforming Fear into Action to Change Your Life and the World COLONIALISM “Colonialism,” I replied, “occurs when a country moves in on another country or culture and takes control of its economy, lands, resources, people, and system of government. ' THE DEATH ECONOMY 'The big corporations were sucking resources from countries around the planet at an unsustainable rate. The driving goal of the corporations was to maximize short-term profits. CEOs were intent on increasing short-term stock prices, market share, or both without regard for the future. It was a system that was bound to fail, to kill itself—what economists would later define as a Death Economy.' SPREAD THE PASSION HOST: Luisa WEBSITE https://passionharvest.com/ WATCH THIS INTERVIEW ON YOUTUBE https://youtu.be/2h6nx8kTxE4 INSTAGRAM- @passionharvest https://www.instagram.com/PassionHarvest/ FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/Passionharvest LEAVE A PODCAST REVIEW IN I TUNES http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1451566598 CONNECT WITH JOHN PERKINS WEBSITE https://johnperkins.org/ FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/johnperkinsauthor/ TWITTER https://twitter.com/jperkinsauthor BOOKS https://touchingthejaguarbook.com/ Thank you, Edward, for inspiring me to post an interview today and also so you have something to watch :)

The Good Problem
Emily Braucher: Cross-cultural communication and why we need to listen

The Good Problem

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2020 44:58


Today on the Good Problem Podcast we have the amazing Emily Braucher of ReFresh Communication talking cross cultural communication and how important it is to listen to those we are working with.⁠ I loved this chat with Emily, and I love this topic - I could talk about it for days on end! So much goes wrong because we consistently look at, and hear things through our own cultural lenses. It's not deliberate, but it can be very harmful and downright dangerous in some cases (there's been a few cases of plane crashes and near misses due to cultural misunderstandings). Emily has worked, volunteered, researched and traveled in over 30 countries including two years of service in the US Peace Corps, She supports diverse clientele including non-profit staff, international business professionals, refugees, university students and high school students both domestically and abroad through her organisation, Refresh Communication.⁠ ⁠ Check out some of Emily's work here: https://www.refreshcommunication.com/trainings/cross-cultural-communication/ Emily is reading: Chestnut Street by Maeve Binchy Emily is listening to: On Being, by Krista Tippett

The Blue Continent Podcast
SPECIAL EDITION: Witness recounts violent riot police attacks in DC (June 1, 2020)

The Blue Continent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2020 12:20


In this special edition of the Blue Continent Podcast, Brennan speaks with Laura Dodson, a former US Peace Corps response volunteer (Philippines). Dodson was near Lafayette Square on Monday, June 1, 2020, when federal riot police charged peaceful protestors and clergy, spraying them with tear gas to clear the path for President Trump to pose for a photo op with a bible outside of St. John's Church. Dodson recounts her experience in detail.

My Doc Journey
MDJ ep017 Interview with Alana DeJoseph

My Doc Journey

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 50:30


Alana DeJoseph is the producer, director, and editor of the feature documentary film, A Towering Task, which explores the history and current relevancy of the US Peace Corps.Learn more about her film, and how to watch it at http://www.peacecorpsdocumentary.com/Learn more about my documentary, Voice of Vanilla, about Madagascar vanilla farmers at http://voiceofvanilla.com/Support the show (https://fromtheheartproductions.networkforgood.com/projects/51992-documentaries-voice-of-vanilla)

Love in the Time of (Covid-19)
Helping the US Peace Corps in getting home!

Love in the Time of (Covid-19)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 3:12


Jim Medwick spent 27 months with the Peace Corps in The Gambia, living with electricity or access to running water. It was a life-changing experience for him, as well as for the community he served. So when the program announced the suspension of operations in all countries due to Covid-19, Jim wanted to use the expertise and experience he had to help out his fellow volunteers. --- Sharing uplifting and funny stories of love, admidst all of the negative, sort-of-depressing truths we're bombarded with right now.

Beyond Today
Jia Tolentino: is the internet fuelling self-delusion?

Beyond Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2019 20:29


Jia Tolentino is a 31-year-old American writer who is being hailed as the voice of a generation. Her pieces for the New Yorker magazine nail everything from feminism to capitalism and vaping. Jia was born in Texas and brought up in a Southern Baptist community; as a teenager she starred in a reality TV show. Later she spent time working for the US Peace Corps in Kyrgystan. Her recently published collection of essays has become one of the most talked about books of the year. You can listen to Jia reading an abridged version of it on BBC Sounds. Just search for Trick Mirror. We speak to Jia Tolentino in New York about the downsides and delusions of living our lives online, and how it means we are like performers who are forever on stage. Presenter: Tina Daheley Producers: Alicia Burrell and Katie Gunning Mixed by Nicolas Raufast Editor: John Shields

Alaska World Affairs Council Presents
THE SECRET LIFE OF AN AMERICAN DIPLOMAT: FACING A FIRING SQUAD IN AFRICA, LIVING IN COMMUNIST ROMANIA, LEADING THE US PEACE CORPS, FIGHTING FIRES, MORE

Alaska World Affairs Council Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2019


The Secret Life of an American Diplomat: Facing a Firing Squad in Africa, Living in Communist Romania, Leading the US Peace Corps, Fighting Fires, & More

Alaska World Affairs Council Presents
THE SECRET LIFE OF AN AMERICAN DIPLOMAT: FACING A FIRING SQUAD IN AFRICA, LIVING IN COMMUNIST ROMANIA, LEADING THE US PEACE CORPS, FIGHTING FIRES, MORE

Alaska World Affairs Council Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2019


The Secret Life of an American Diplomat: Facing a Firing Squad in Africa, Living in Communist Romania, Leading the US Peace Corps, Fighting Fires, & More

Restaurant Owners Uncorked - by Schedulefly
Shawn Stokes and the story of Luna Rotisserie

Restaurant Owners Uncorked - by Schedulefly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2019 84:38


Luna’s chef and owner, Shawn Stokes, has over 15 years experience in the restaurant industry. A 1998 graduate of Johnson & Wales University’s culinary arts program, he has worked in numerous successful establishments up and down the East Coast, including the Ritz Carlton in Naples, FL, Chillingsworth in Cape Cod, MA, Hank’s and Peninsula Grille in Charleston, SC, and Komi in Washington, DC. During his time in the industry, he served in front-of-house and back-of-house roles, gaining a well-rounded understanding of restaurant operations and management. In 2005, Shawn left the restaurant world to pursue a career in international development. He spent the next 10 years working in different parts of the world, gaining experience with organizations such as the US Peace Corps, USAID, UNICEF, CARE International, and Catholic Relief Services. Unable to stray too far from his culinary background, much of his work centered on improving global food systems. Most often, he lived and worked in Latin America, where he collaborated with coffee growers in Ecuador, subsistence farmers in El Salvador, shrimp fishermen in Mexico, and cattle ranchers in Brazil. Shawn and his wife, Maria, moved to Durham in 2009 and were struck by the exciting changes taking place in the city. Wanting to start a family, they soon decided to make Durham their home. It wasn’t long before Shawn could no longer resist contributing to Durham’s rapidly evolving culinary scene. Luna is the result of his love for Durham, Latin America, and delicious food. Luna opened four years ago this month, and is a very well-regarded restaurant in Durham. Shawn was welcoming, warm, kind, and honest with his story and his philosophies on what it takes not only to run a successful restaurant, but to run any successful business. Enjoy...