Podcasts about barrier reef

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Outcrop of rock in the sea formed by the growth and deposit of stony coral skeletons

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Best podcasts about barrier reef

Latest podcast episodes about barrier reef

Garage Logic
11/24 Great emails further explaining what has happened to the cash bail system in America

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 93:39


Great emails further explaining what has happened to the cash bail system in America. Woke experts are instructing us that we can't use the term looter, it's just too racist. Johnny Heidt composes Thanksgiving song for guitar news and Australia's Barrier Reef has healed itself.

Travelling Señorita
EP 89- Day trip to Lady Elliot Island, Southern Barrier Reef.

Travelling Señorita

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 12:26


We take a day trip from Bundaberg to Lady Elliot Island, a scenic 20 minute flight to the Southern tip of the Great Barrier Reef.

Travelling Señorita
EP 88-48 hours in Bargara, Southern Barrier Reef. (pt 1)

Travelling Señorita

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 12:36


Bargara Beach on the Bundaberg Coast, from breweries to farmers to beaches.

Tech Guide
Tech Guide Episode 462 - NBN boost, Virtual Barrier Reef diving, Apple Wallet expands

Tech Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 47:23


How to get the most out of your NBN connection at a time when we need it most, how you can dive the Great Barrier Reef virtually, Australia becomes the first country in the world to includes health insurance cards in Apple Wallet, we take a look at the new Uniden Guardian App Cam Home+ camera which you can pan and tilt, Norton's Game Optimiser can improve performance by 30 per cent, new Jura coffee machine that can make hot and cold brews and your tech questions are answered in the Tech Guide Help Desk.

SBS German - SBS Deutsch
Will the Barrier Reef be put on the Red List? - Wird das Barrier Reef auf die Rote Liste gesetzt?

SBS German - SBS Deutsch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 13:33


The UNESCO World Heritage Committee will discuss the status of the Great Barrier Reef on Friday, July 23. Since 1985, nearly half of the Barrier Reef has died. UNESCO has recommended that the world-famous coral reef be placed on the list of endangered world natural sites. Australia has tried with all means to prevent this, because this would not only have economic consequences, but also damage the reputation of Australia. Scientists, however, consider the UN's action to be justified and call for swift action against climate change. - Das UNESCO Welterbekomitee diskutiert am Freitag den 23. Juli den Status des Great Barrier Reef. Seit 1985 ist fast die Hälfte des Barrier Reef abgestorben. Die UNESCO hat empfohlen das weltberühmte Korallenriff auf die Liste der gefährdeter Weltnaturerbestätten zu setzten. Australien hat mit allen Mitteln versucht das zu verhindern, denn das würde nicht nur wirtschaftliche Folgen haben, sondern auch das Ansehen Australiens schädigen. Wissenschafter halten das Vorgehen der UN jedoch für begründet und fordern rasche Massnahmen gegen den Klimawandel.

Not Good Enough
78 — Oh THAT Barrier Reef

Not Good Enough

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 57:04


We spend about half an hour yelling about lockdowns. Sorry. Then we chat about what Australia's Environment Minister has been up to.   Lockdown again again A limo driver at the center of the Sydney outbreak was eligible for the vaccine, but didn't get one because he was afraid to. Police are trying to pin something on him. Gladys Berejiklian admits to pork-barrelling. Richard Pusey filmed dying police officers. Prime Minster Scott Morrison says the outbreak is NSW's fault. Ssussann Ley Federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley added an extra “s” to her name because of a misunderstanding of numerology. Maybe just so she could add an extra cool S? Check out episode 74: Care of Duty: Modern Lawfare. Sussan Ley vetoed a massive new renewable energy hub, quoting “environmental impacts”. …while approving 21 offshore gas drilling sites near Victoria's Twelve Apostles. She also put the solar power industry “on notice”, saying they need to sort out recycling. Australia has very little actual recycling infrastructure. Ley is also considering allowing a banned poison to deal with NSW's mouse plague. She was “blindsided” by UNESCO recommending that the Great Barrier Reef be placed on a list as in “great danger”. Greens Senator Peter Whish-Wilson forced the Audit Office to admit that the Government's $444 million grant to the Great Barrier Reef Foundation was to avoid the very same UNESCO listing. Shoutouts Shoutout to the workers at General Mills who struck and won a pay rise and bonus!

Please Explain
UNESCO's Barrier Reef warning is ‘where the rubber hits the road' for Australia and climate change

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 10:22


The Australian government says it was blindsided on Tuesday by the United Nations heritage organisation's warning it is considering listing the Great Barrier Reef as “in danger”. The move could mean the reef loses its status as a natural wonder. Environment Minister Sussan Ley and Foreign Minister Marise Payne responded to UNESCO immediately, saying Australia's stewardship of the reef was “world class”. But the listing would likely be related to global warming, with Australia under pressure to set a target of net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Today on Please Explain, climate and energy correspondent Mike Foley joins Tory Maguire to discuss UNESCO's draft decision to downgrade the Great Barrier Reef's World Heritage status. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Please Explain
UNESCO's Barrier Reef warning is ‘where the rubber hits the road' for Australia and climate change

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 10:22


The Australian government says it was blindsided on Tuesday by the United Nations heritage organisation's warning it is considering listing the Great Barrier Reef as “in danger”. The move could mean the reef loses its status as a natural wonder. Environment Minister Sussan Ley and Foreign Minister Marise Payne responded to UNESCO immediately, saying Australia's stewardship of the reef was “world class”. But the listing would likely be related to global warming, with Australia under pressure to set a target of net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Today on Please Explain, climate and energy correspondent Mike Foley joins Tory Maguire to discuss UNESCO's draft decision to downgrade the Great Barrier Reef's World Heritage status. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chaser Report
The Grave Barrier Reef

The Chaser Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 22:18


Today we explain why the Great Barrier Reef isn't "endangered" like those UNESCO whingers say, the PM didn't plan a hypocritical tourist visit, and Sydney and Melbourne should stop fighting each other and pick on Brisbane. And if that wasn't enough, we throw in a Norwegian sexual position known as "koala clamping". See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Daily Good
Episode 276: A new ship can clean plastic from the ocean as it sails, beautiful words from the “Bard of Bengal”, the beauty of the Belize Barrier Reef, an early birthday for King Oliver, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 20:41


Good News: A grant of funds from the U.S. government will help clear leftover land mines from Zimbabwe and South Africa, Link HERE. The Good Word: The first of a week’s worth of brilliant quotes from Rabindarath Tagore. Good To Know: An interesting fact about the etymology of the name “Bonobo”… Good News: A new […]

Womyn Travel
WT 31: Kyana Swims with Crocodiles

Womyn Travel

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2021 42:15


Music is by King and Queen of the Losers,Thank you again to Kyana Van Houten for letting me interview you. I am looking forward to chatting more about European travels (which we didn't even touch on yet!) Happy Mother's day this month & thank you to my mom for being such a wonderful source of support. May your garden never freeze and the deer never eat your flowers. As a final note, this month is AAPI History month because  on May 10, 1869, the first American Transcontinental Railroad was completed, and that project was greatly created by Asian -Immigrant workers.  Make time to check out art exhibits, screenings of movies like Minari, and PBS' Documentary simply called Asian Americans or watch lessons that aim to teach participants about Asian Pacific culture, such as Asian tea practices, Indian shadow puppets, and Taiwanese calligraphy. Please consider donating to Support AAPI communities and those affected by anti-asian violence: https://www.gofundme.com/c/act/stop-aapi-hateSupport the AAPI Civic Engagement Fund: https://aapifund.orgFinally, thank you for listening. Stay safe & Happy Travels.

The Writing Gym Podcast
Ep. 144: Refocus With Your Writing | David O'Hara

The Writing Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 28:28


Annalisa speaks with David O'Hara, professor at Augustana University about how to make time for your writing, immersing yourself in research for your writing, and more! In this episode, you're going to learn: How to make time for your writing How to refocus and find time to write How writing from your authentic self will make your writing pay off You'll want to be sure to download the free resource guide, Making Time to Write, for this episode that will walk you through how to dive deep into the research that could help your novel come to life. So take a minute and download the resource guide at www.writing-gym.com/refocus. Don't forget the dash!  David O'Hara is the co-author of From Homer to Harry Potter, The Hobbit and Philosophy, and Narnia and the Fields of Arbol - among others. He writes about wild places like the Alaskan Tundra, the Rainforest of Guatemala, or the Barrier Reef of Belize.

SBS German - SBS Deutsch
Environment - The Adani/Bravus mine - Umwelt - Wer macht hier eigentlich die Kohle?

SBS German - SBS Deutsch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 31:27


In our environmental series with Dorothee Babeck we are talking about the proposed Carmichael coal mine in Queensland's Galilee Basin. The company Adani, which changed its name to Bravus a few weeks ago after violations or "misinterpretations" of the environmental permit conditions, submitted the first plans for the world's largest mine, along with the necessary harbour on the Barrier Reef, back in 2010. Since then, there has been a dispute about whether and under what conditions the coal mine should be approved. Our environmental specialist Dorothee Babeck explains the background, the developments in the field of approval procedures and licences, the efforts of the more than 300 groups of climate and environmental activists who are campaigning against the mine - about what mining would mean for the GBR and the Artesian Basin, i.e. the underground water supply, what the indigenous population thinks about it and who actually benefits from it. - In unserer Umwelt-Serie mit Dorothee Babeck geht es heute um das geplante Adani/Bravus Steinkohlebergwerk Carmichael im Galilee-Becken in Queensland.

Handle with Care:  Empathy at Work
He is a Gift and Every Day is Enough: Cerebral Palsy

Handle with Care: Empathy at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 60:49


- Peter Kline I'm never doing enough, never doing enough of working enough with them and never doing enough therapy outside of therapy hours with them and knowing the importance of that, but also trying to manage the responsibility and guilt that comes along with that while also, also being clear on. But every day with him is a gift and every day is enough.  That's it. It's it's holding those two things together that often feels very difficult, but that's kind of what we're given to manage.   INTRO My guests today are Janice McRandal and Peter Kline.  They are here to talk about their son, Leo, what it is like to raise him and love him as he lives with cerebral palsy.  Cerebral palsy is the most common motor disability in childhood, it affects the ability to move and maintain balance and we will hear about how CP impacts their lives.    We also talk about baseball, rugby, sharks, and you will have the joy of listening to the particular lilt of Janice’s accent.    As always, I want you to know Peter and Janice as more than just their role as Leo’s parents.  Peter and Janice live in Queensland, Australia and, when I spoke to them, they had just returned from a trip to the Barrier Reef.    - Janice McRandal Oh, yes, just you know, it's one of the world's beautiful spots, so it was really quite a stunningly different experience to the pandemic apathy that set in to go our beautiful rhythm and just have these days in a day or two in paradise.   - Liesel Mertes Are you snorkelers? Are you divers? Do you do some of both?   - Peter Kline No, that was the first time I have ever snorkel.   - Janice McRandal Oh, really? I didn't know that.   - Peter Kline Yeah, I know. Never snorkel before.   - Janice McRandal Oh, well that's the way to do it. That's the way it is if you're going to be the first time.   Peter Kline Go. Go big.   You might have gathered that Peter is not a native of Australia.  Peter was born in Houston.  He traveled to Chicago, where we overlapped at Wheaton College for our undergraduate work.  And, after marrying Janice, he moved to Australia where he teaches and works with young ordinands at the Charles Sturt University in Australia, a theological college that helps those seeking ordination in the Anglican Church.  When he is not working, Peter enjoys a few hobbies.     - Peter Kline When I'm not teaching. So I, I love to paint. That's probably the number one thing that I that I do when I find the time, which is difficult these days to sneak in time to paint. Yeah, that's what I, I love to make art and paint. So that's, that's kind of my main thing that I try to do outside of my professional life.   - Peter Kline And I also I have also taken up or re-entered rather playing baseball. So, you know, moving to Australia, you know, you have to find ways to stay connected to your American roots.   Janice is also a theologian.  As you will hear in a little bit, that is acutally one of the sparks that brought Peter and Janice together.  Janice works at the University of Divinity and is the director of the Centre for Discourse, which does public theology.  She, like Peter, also loves sport.    - Janice McRandal So I'm a big lover of sport, so I am part of that clichéd Australian sport loving lifestyle. So I play by play sport. I play touch football, which is touch rugby, I guess would be the way to say it.   - Janice McRandal I played that for twenty eight years, so since I was 12. So I just play weekly in a more and much more social team. Again, not super serious, competitive and I really enjoy that.   - Janice McRandal I will only give it up when my body says I absolutely have to.   Janice also loves to cook   - Peter Kline One of Janice's skills is actually to clean as she cooks. Yeah. So so it's often like to get to the end of a cooking session and you have this amazing, delicious, beautiful food and a clean kitchen here. And it's like what, what did you do that.   - Janice McRandal It is my superpower in the kitchen. I am that rare cook that like is always cleaning as she goes. And there's nothing makes me happier.   - Liesel Mertes And would you give us an overview of your origins story?   - Liesel Mertes Did you get together?   - Peter Kline Oh, the two of us? Yes. Yeah,   - Janice McRandal Entirely by accident. Certainly not. Certainly not something one would plan for. So we both work in the same field in academia. We're both in backgrounds, in and teaching in theology. And we had connected over a number of things.   - Janice McRandal I think we first met at a conference in 2012 and we had mutual friends and sort of knew each other in a very friendly way. And then a very good friend of mine was moving to Nashville to start a Ph.D. in the same similar program, same school as where Peter was at Vanderbilt.   - Janice McRandal And I was I had about a year before going through a separation and divorce and was visiting her. And I knew a number of people through the theological world at Vanderbilt. Peter is one of them. And we had made plans to go for breakfast in a very you know, neither of us were at all interested in each other. It was just a great big accident that came upon us.   - Liesel Mertes And do you remember expressly like that initial breakfast? Can you go back and think, you know, like, I got the omelette and I was just over bacon or.   - Janice McRandal Yeah, yeah. What did you have for breakfast? Do you remember?   - Peter Kline Yeah, it was the I know what I can see and picture it.   - Janice McRandal I can remember the where I had to go to the Cuban breakfast is what it was called on the menu. Yeah that's right.   - Janice McRandal And then Peter took me to erm I'm, I've got a high level of camp and I delight in weird awful things. And Peter turns to the, the Parthenon in Nashville, which I did. People kept saying to me, when you're in Nashville you should go to the Parthenon. I was assuming it was some Greek restaurant that people liked. I had no idea about this actual enormous structure replica.   - Janice McRandal Peter took me to that and it was just delightful. And we jumped on the back of the elementary school field trip. Yep. It was just a fun, enjoyable day.   MUSICAL TRANSITION   – Janice McRandal   So, you know, after I spent quite a bit of time with Peter during that trip in Nashville, and then Peter came to see me while I was in New York.   - Janice McRandal And just by chance, he was coming to Australia two weeks later to a conference I was organising. And we'd already planned as friends like in a purely platonic way, for him to come and stay with me and my home. And so at the end of both of these trips, we realized that we were falling in love. And what are we going to do now?   - Janice McRandal So we did two years very, very long because, you know, people say long distance to our flights and we love.   - Janice McRandal So it was a long two years.   - Janice McRandal But we've you know, we've both been divorced. We didn't want to rush into anything. So we thought we did the work we had to do to make sure this was the right move forward for us. And then at the end of that two years, Peter moved to Australia and we were married. Woo-hoo!   Peter and Janice were married, twice, in 2016.  They had a ceremony in Australia and another in Houston.  Janice entered the marriage with two children, a son and a daughter who were six and nine.  And Janice and Peter knew they wanted to have a child together.         - Liesel Mertes How soon after you got married did you find out you were pregnant?   - Janice McRandal Well, immediately. So I had just gone off the pill and we came back from from our second wedding. So we already had this first wedding, came back from the second wedding in America. And I was immediately pregnant. And we were really like that was in the first like we were very shocked and was far sooner than we had anticipated.   - Janice McRandal But we're excited. Yeah. And then but I we had a miscarriage at eight weeks and, you know, it was really sad about that. And it was all, you know, been such a whirlwind. We'd just gotten married. Peter's moved halfway across the world and then that suddenly happened. So much had been happening.   - Janice McRandal And so then we decided we would just stop trying for six months or so, for four or five months just to give us some time.   - Janice McRandal All of us had fallen pregnant easily, so we would just give her some space. And then I fell pregnant again in the following, like six months later if and we had an ultrasound at nine weeks and there was no hobby.   - Janice McRandal Yes. And that I would say that hit us much harder. Yeah. The second one. Yeah. And then we, you know, so I had to have surgery and DNC and the eldest two children were with us that day. There was nothing we could do about it. So it was all just it was a sad, confronting time and we felt very sad about that.   - Janice McRandal So that was April, May, May when I had that surgery and what, twenty seven, three point thirty seven.   - Janice McRandal And I think and now we're starting to feel a little bit anxious. And of course, you know this as a woman gets older, like for me, there is suddenly that internalized anxiety of like Peter to has not had his own children. What if I can't, what if, what if this becomes a thing? Now I start having repeat miscarriages and we kind have a baby. He's my, I'm three years older than him.   - Janice McRandal So is he going to regret having married me? All these kind of fears and griefs and they weren't unspoken. We we we shared that with each other, but it felt a level of intensity around that which are many, many people in all sorts of different situations would relate to, I'm sure.   - Liesel Mertes And then so much tumult in just this first stretch of being married, right?   - Janice McRandal Yeah, a lot. Absolutely. And, you know, it's a second marriage for both of us.   - Janice McRandal So you're so anxious not to get it wrong.   - Peter Kline That's right.   - Janice McRandal And there's so much baggage in history that you carry into that that you're trying to negotiate and not lose yourself. You know, that's a big fear for suddenly for us, I think. Would you say that after divorce?   - Peter Kline Yeah, definitely and figuring out and carrying all of that and figuring out how to. You know, be the new family that we're trying to be both with Jesse and Penelope and trying to bring another child into that, it's just a lot, right, is just a lot of.   - Janice McRandal And you've just moved and you just moved. Right.   - Peter Kline So you're figuring out how to be married again. And and it's you know, it's a second marriage. It's just very different from first marriage. And so, yeah, it's it's just a lot. Yeah. Shorthold so then so then in August, so it wasn't very far.   - Janice McRandal So obviously we didn't have difficulty falling pregnant. Then in August we found out it was the lowest.   - Janice McRandal No, in October it was in October we found that we were pregnant with Leo. Yeah.   - Janice McRandal Yeah. And we were nervous. We were scared and anxious. The first three months I think I had about four or five ultrasounds and I was having all sorts of symptoms.   - Janice McRandal It actually like there were real symptoms. But I think the biggest symptom was my anxiety.   - Liesel Mertes Absolutely, after having those losses, just I I imagine it would be very easy to be overshadowed by the uncertainty, right?   - Janice McRandal Absolutely. We were. Just hoping and praying and biding time. But once we got there, I think once we got through that three months, we definitely. To level, you know, as much as we could calm down and feel excited and happy and secure and looking forward to having a baby together   Janice and Peter are happy, expectant.  They are eight weeks away from Leo’s due date.  Janice was lecturing at the college and Peter left to go and hear an Australian author, Tom Winton, talk about a new book release.    - Peter Kline And I had traveled how many hours was about two to two and a half hours across state lines and then it down into New South Wales from Queensland to go hear him talk about his new book. Janice started feeling   - Janice McRandal Well, I guess I was having contractions then. I was in complete denial about that.   - Janice McRandal I rang the hospital and said, I'm very sure I'm not having a baby. But and and then the I guess the midwife I spoke to said, well, well, I really think you should come in and maybe you should come in. So but Peter was not at home. I rang him and I said, yes, that's right.   - Peter Kline I think what you I think the first text you texted me was, you know, don't don't panic. Don't worry, the baby's not arriving, but I'm going to the hospital just in case I think was your first to and I was like, this is not good. So as soon as I got that text and realised that she was on her way to the hospital, I just left, right and left where I was and started driving, driving home.   A friend takes Janice to the hospital as Peter is rushing home, racking up speeding tickets from Australia’s camera monitoring system.  Meanwhile, doctor’s are trying to slow down Janice’s labor, she will need a C-section.    - Janice McRandal So I made that spinal block. They could they failed it. Three attempts to get this one block in, which is very unpleasant for me. And, you know, I'm having these very regular contractions, but it's slowed down the process significantly. And Peter made it clear, was being brought like into the operating theatre at this point.   Janice McRandal When we when Peter arrived and I walked into the operating theatre and within five minutes, Leo had arrived.   - Liesel Mertes Yeah, that's so intense for both of you.   - Janice McRandal It was very intense. Like Peter arrived into, like, you know, a mess of adrenaline. Yeah.    - Janice McRandal Because he's come speeding along this freeway thinking he's not going he designed himself to not making it.   - Peter Kline But yeah, I thought that kind of halfway through I was like, oh, I don't know if I'm going to make it. And I had to turn myself in. So it was a little bit, you know, OK, I had to go through my sort of mini even grieving process as I was driving as I go into the with the birth of my child and OK.  But I just hope he's OK or, you know, so all that kind of stuff,   Because Leo has come eight weeks early.  He has to initially go to the NICU.  But he is strong and moving and is soon moved to a special care nursey where he has to stay for the next four weeks.    - Janice McRandal So you have to adjust rapidly. And for the first few days, I was just in shock. You know, I didn't believe I was having a baby. And suddenly there was a baby and that also had a mother, a third C-section. And I'm just about to turn 38. And I was just deeply in shock. But then you you have to rapidly adapt. And I have to start expressing milk, which is the liquid gold, trying to get that in.   - Janice McRandal And and the pressure in Australia public hospital system, the special care unit, they have milk banks donated breast milk. Also, the research shows how beneficial this is for especially premature babies. But they will they is a very limited supply. So they will only provide the milk. A premature baby needs up to thirty six week gestation. Then they have to cut them off. They just don't have enough.   - Janice McRandal They need milk. So there's this immediate pressure placed on you. You need to get your milk supply in and be producing enough to to be feeding this baby by thirty six weeks and providing all the nutritional need to. That with them was the immediate pressure on me. OK, I've got to be expressing milk constantly and it was just a surreal kind of, you know, you adapt immediately to this program. And we were both, you know, routine of getting up in the morning going, spending the day at the hospital, doing his cares, as they call it, changing him, nursing him and doing skin to skin as much as possible and starting to teach him how to suckle on slowly doing that and then going home.   - Janice McRandal And as you know, every three hours expressing that just became a routine for four weeks. Yeah, I think I that's a strange, surreal, exhausting routine.   - Janice McRandal And we were moving because we, like many idiots, had planned to move four weeks before he was going to be born. So which actually meant around the time he then was coming home, we were moving. Yeah.   - Janice McRandal So it was like and then Peter got poisoned so severely he had to go in an ambulance line hospital.   - Janice McRandal It was just it was a difficult time.   - Liesel Mertes That I in my experience with being in the NICU or having to not not me, but having a child in the NICU. You know, as you were talking, the word that came to mind was totalizing. You know, it's just I felt that it was amazing how your world just. Is encompassed in this building walls and that these other things that, like I had been doing previously or caring about and, you know, even like moving and it just, you know, just the reality of being present there with your child seems almost overwhelming, let alone trying to incorporate any other need or reality out of those walls.   - Janice McRandal Yeah, no, this is it. But you would come home at the end of the day and the home was suddenly this strange alien place. I didn't care about it. I'm just going to drop everything.   - Janice McRandal Eight, go to sleep and get back to the hospital, like maybe three hours later.   - Peter Kline Yeah, that's right.   - Peter Kline Yeah, it's true. It is a totalizing experience in space. And I mean that what that makes me think of is actually where we ended up leaving and going home, which is this joyful thing. You finally get to bring our baby home.   - Peter Kline But remember this. Great. Like sadness, leaving, leaving the hospital. And it's a strange experience because you're both happy to be finally leaving and you're leaving is good news. But at the same time, it's this this has been your whole world.   - Peter Kline And also it's been our whole support network. It's been our whole lifeline. It's been our hope for for you know, I mean, a month isn't a long time. But when you're, you know, going through something like that, it is a long time. It's just it's a life altering adapted quickly. It's a life altering, transformative space you've been through. So it's like you're having to say goodbye to all of that all at once. That was an overwhelming experience of itself.   - Janice McRandal And this child that you now have deeply bonded with very quickly, you can't remember when they didn't exist has never been outside of these walls.   - Peter Kline Yeah, that's right. And is and has never been outside like a very extensive team of doctors and nurses caring. And now it's just OK. Well, it's our responsibility is the whole world.   Liesel Mertes You had your own expulsion from a womb like setting up.   Peter and Janice go home feeling confident and optimistic.  Leo had done well; he didn’t have substantial complications.  However, Leo had to be readmitted several months later.  He was not gaining weight or meeting expected milestones.    - Peter Kline What does that mean, we don't know, is it just because he's or is it just because he's premature and that he's just developing a bit slower and there's the whole, you know, kind of corrected age thing when they're they're kind of age, but then they have this corrected age.   - Janice McRandal So you can be corrected. But he wasn't quite getting the correct age milestones.   - Peter Kline So it's all it's it's it was all that. And and, of course, you know, within a like within a relationship, a parenting relationship, I mean, in any circumstance, parents interpret their children differently. But there's like, you know, I feel like we had different just a different interpretative lenses. Through what, through what to kind of interpret what's going on. You.   - Peter Kline Yeah, because Janice has had two kids before, and so she knows about what a typical developing kid looks like and I haven't.   - Peter Kline But I also think Janice was more quick just to say I think something's wrong here. I think Leo is not developing. And I think I was slower. Maybe I was I don't think I was in denial about it, but I think it was just slower coming around to OK, yeah, there is something   - Janice McRandal And I process trauma really quickly. That's why I saw myself in the deep end. So I guess it's the personality type. Yes. Like. That's one way I deal with with trauma is by naming it as quickly as possible so Leo would eventually be diagnosed. I even said that at three months, I think that he might have cerebral palsy. Yeah. So, which probably at that stage seemed very premature pronouncement, but that is certainly how I deal with that.   - Liesel Mertes That was the force of your gut and intuition. Yeah. Yeah. How how old was he when he officially received the diagnosis of cerebral palsy?   - Peter Kline How old was he?   - Janice McRandal Was he he was he was quite young. He was 10 months old. Well, 10 to 11 months old. And he had been admitted to hospital when he was seven months old because he's weight had, you know, he'd gone from starting at the sixtieth percentile to under four and negative into the negative.   - Janice McRandal And he was clear at this point, they're starting to use the language of global developmental delay.   - Janice McRandal So this is a very, very floppy baby. So very low tone. So he'd never, you know, rolled over. He still couldn't hold his head. He couldn't hold his head up. He was, it was like he was a one month old, really, for the largely for the first year of his life.   - Janice McRandal So he was admitted and they decided to put an NG tube back in which he'd had in the special care unit to get his nutrition up. And that had that he'd be we'd been in the hospital for two weeks in the initial round of trying to get his weight on and begin a diagnostic process. And Peter has a nephew with a mitochondrial disease. And so there was a high level of concern around genetic, very serious and potentially life ending genetic disorders for Leo.   - Janice McRandal So in that first round, we'd gone through this process of testing for all the big scary things like Mito, Fragile Z, Prater-Willi.   - Janice McRandal So he'd had comprehensive testing very early on and we'd seen really the best pediatric pediatric geneticist in this in the state very early on and eliminated those things. So there was a certain relief that came with that, like certainly we'd gone from the worst. What might seem, I guess for many people, the worst case scenario to something that some that's you know, it's all relative. Some starting to talk about CP seemed much at that point. I think a bit of a relief.   - Liesel Mertes I just imagine that there's such a profound. Level of what is being asked of you on like an emotional and physical level, whether that's, you know, presently or back then, that for people that have children that don't have, you know, developmental delays or things like that, like that, they can't quite fathom just some of the dailiness of what you're having to incorporate along with this overarching kind of emotional like uncertainty.   - Liesel Mertes I might be wrong about that, but if any of that sparks something in you, I'd love to have either of you or both speak about that yet.   - Janice McRandal So definitely I think that around the time of Leo's diagnosis, I was I was not up for this. Like I had had such a traumatic year since his birth and I had not recovered well from the C-section, multiple infections. And his feeding was absolutely erratic. So even when he had the energy to put back in at seven months, Leo was constantly on the breast, sometimes going with just 20 minute breaks and he never slept. Occasionally he'd sleep a two hour span and that would be it.   - Janice McRandal And I had two other children to care for their own needs and was constantly feeding this child or he was crying, needing, settling. And so I think by the time it got to around his diagnosis and there was late before, it's really an unknown future.   - Janice McRandal I was I was not up for this and probably I was depressed. Probably I had some postnatal depression. And so I say at that time, there was enormous pressure on Peter. I like feeling that I'm on the brink of maybe not being able to, like, go on, which I don't think was the case, but that feeling was always there.   - Janice McRandal If not, I can't do it anymore Peter I can't do this and I go to sleep. I was so exhausted.   - Peter Kline Yeah, I mean, for a good I mean, over a year, it's just like you're living on the absolute edge of your resources, like emotional, physical, cognitive. It's just like you're just have to set up camp there, right. Yeah. And it's it's it's just overwhelming. And I think my like remembering back, like I associate like so much of this around, like the physical symbol for this is Leo's NG tube, his nasogastric tube, the tube that goes into his nose and down into his stomach, just having to manage and deal with that.   - Peter Kline You know, it's a tiny little piece of plastic, but it it just caused so much stress and trauma. And, you know, because you're having to take this thing to your child's face every day and it comes off of a day out at least once a day on average, once a day, pull it out. And at the beginning, we had to go to the emergency room every time to have it reinserted. Eventually, I learned how to put it back in myself, but it was just a trauma.   - Peter Kline But it's just like a traumatic experience every time it comes out and you have to put it back in. And and just the constant anxiety around, I mean, just the weight and nutrition you're having to keep track of. But then it's just a, the constant, like constant monitoring for him not to pull the thing out or to keep his hands away from vomited every time he nearly in tears.   - Janice McRandal Yeah. So it's it's just, you know, it's just like it felt like there was never a moment in which you could just. Let your baby be right, you know, or enjoy your baby or enjoy it, just this concept.   - Janice McRandal Yeah. So, yeah, it was tough.  So I didn't know if it's a case of, like, what's being asked of us is too big right now in terms of a lifetime.   - Janice McRandal So we're just going to keep struggling along day by day. And that really the turning point was when after some MRI's and various brain scans, the hospital decided we could do something about sleeping and sleep clinic where we rapidly weaned him and got him off the breast and he started taking some melatonin. And yeah, within a month or two, he started sleeping. And that was a major turning point for us. He's about 15 months old then before.   - Liesel Mertes That is a long time to be for him to be, you know, not sleeping well and a long time for you guys. All right. I can imagine how that would feel like a very profound turning point.   - Janice McRandal Well, it's probably more, I should say, is probably more of a turning point for me, because I think I had I was so utterly exhausted.   - Janice McRandal It was at that point I said, right, Peter, you're up. I need to sleep for a year and you're up. And I do think that's right. That's right. Just and that's what was needed is appropriate. But it is probably more of a turning point for me.   - Peter Kline Yeah. Because you could in a way you could let go of. Of certain, to a certain degree, certain tasks and the constancy of certain tasks around caring for Leo and it could transfer to me in a certain way. So, yeah.   - Janice McRandal But also, it's a major turning point for Leo, this poor child gets what he desperately needs, sleep, sleep. So. And, you know, three or four months after that, he actually started sleeping. He had a surgery to have a peg inserted tube, which in Australia happens far more even then after having an NG tube for a year, almost a year was soon in Australia.   - Janice McRandal So I know in America, friends and relatives, pigs get put in after for six weeks, even even up until a year in Australia. They're reluctant to do that as a permanent move. So we had to really push to have that put in. And that really was the final big change for Leo that he hated this to be pulled it out every day and then we'd have to pin him down again. And and that was just a great relief. And he's been such a happy little boy since, like, it's like a different child since birth, to sleep and getting rid of it and the NG tube.   - Janice McRandal Yeah. And he became happy and we finally could delight in him and enjoy at that time together and which hadn't really been that possible up until this point.   We will return to Peter and Janice in just a moment.  But we need to take a quick break to acknowledge our sponsors.  The first is FullStack PEO.  FullStack is a full-service benefits firm here in Indianapolis.  The specialize in helping small business owners and entrepreneurs navigate tasks like payroll and open enrollment.  Their talented team skillfully handles all of those details, caring for your people so you can grow your business.   We are also sponsored by Handle with Care Consulting, my company.  You are being faced with so many challenges each day and it is hard to know how to show support when your people need it most.  From targeted trainings on Compassion Fatigue, Resiliency, and Creating a Culture of Support to Certification Programs in Workplace Empathy, Handle with Care Consulting will help you pay attention to what matters most:  your people.    Now, back to my conversation with Peter and Janice…   - Liesel Mertes Tell me tell me a little bit about September 2020. Leo, what are things that you are especially enjoying about him this month?   - Peter Kline This month. Yeah, we let's see. Well so many speech, so many things. So, so he's come this year. He's come a long way with his speech. So he's he started babbling this year   - Janice McRandal A few months ago really like using consonants and vowels.   - Peter Kline And so he's still not you know, he's still not anywhere near, you know, words or that kind of and he may never get there. We don't know. But just in terms of his vocalizations and ability to express and communicate things with,   - Janice McRandal I'm pretty sure he said hi to us a couple of times this week. The three walked in from work. Hi, Leo. And he said hi back.   - Peter Kline Yeah. So that's the delight. Yeah.   - Peter Kline So that's that's been wonderful. It's wonderful to see his. Ability to do like his physical development and ability to play with things, and even just yesterday he was able to put together successive rolls and roll halfway across the living room to go get a toy that he was wanting. And that was just wonderful to see. You know,   - Janice McRandal I guess we're really starting to see his agency. Yeah, it's interesting that we haven't previously and it's such a big broad, CP is such a big, broad, questionable diagnosis that it doesn't give you any sense of where you're heading or what might be the future for you.   - Janice McRandal So it's like discovering all the time, ever, any time something new develops. Oh, and he can do that now.   - Peter Kline Yeah. Another another big thing is his eating. So we're actually currently in the midst of trying to wean him from his feeding tube. So this is another big weaning process. So it's both it's both a kind of new stressor, but also another source of delight to really kind of see him picking up his ability to eat orally. So so we're kind of slowly reducing the amount that we put through his tube to try to encourage him to be able to gain his oral appetite.   - Peter Kline So and he's been doing overall, he's been doing really well. So to see him have a new relationship with food, be able to enjoy food, to be able to figure out what kinds of foods in particular he likes. His ability to drink, you know, so that's, you know, to drink water and liquids and like   - Peter Kline So it's so it's really it's just a lot of these very simple, basic developmental things that with Leo are stretched out. And and very slowly emerging, but it's it's just delightful to watch them absolutely happen across this very long, slow timeline.   - Janice McRandal I mean, I feel like we've jumped stories because we're now smiling. Our energy is picked up. It's like when these things occurred, we're almost talking about a different child. Like he was so hungry and tired for so long he couldn't emerge from himself.   - Peter Kline That's right.   - Liesel Mertes And Janice, you mentioned some of the uncertainty within a CP diagnosis. How have you two, and I imagine it's like, a becoming not something that you've just figured out, but what what is important for you as you orient your own expectations and your parenting within some of the uncertainty that CP brings things into your family?   - Janice McRandal Yeah, I guess, you know, some of that happens on a theoretical intellectual level. You know, we're both academics. I'm just stopping somebody at our front door. We need to oh, we're having mandatory fire extinguishers, which are. Hello. Sorry. No, that's fine for me to do it if this is in the background. Did you want me to go? Are you happy for me to continue this a little bit of noise in the background or do you want me to wait? How about you continue and if at any moment it becomes intolerable clamor, I will cause you OK? Yeah. So I think some of that happened on a theoretical level of thinking through, well, what does what does it intellectually mean to to think about disability? And both Peter and I in scholarship have, you know, read from disability studies in the past. So it's there not unknown theoretical questions to us, but also thinking through as parents.   - Janice McRandal What does it mean to, to prioritize certain forms of development, for example, you know, like one of the things around this idea of what if my child never says mommy, like, what would that mean to me? And would that be a lesser that be a grief because who he is is not enough? For example, theoretical questions around that.   - Janice McRandal But the, but the big emotional grief part, I think, and this is something Peter and I have talked about a lot, is really it's largely suspended because we don't know what we're grieving at any given time. We don't know what what will or will not emerge or happen for Leo at this point.   - Janice McRandal We don't even have great indicators. I mean, we know that it's very unlikely, for example, Leo will walk unassisted ever. That's really that's that's off the table. But we don't know to what level he'll be able to. self-propel in a wheelchair, for example, the walker use a walker, we don't know.   - Janice McRandal Speech, again, as Peter said, is unknown. And even even where his cognitive ability is that we're a long way off really being able to have maybe four or five or six, we might have a better idea around that.   - Janice McRandal But so it's a real. It's an unusual. Way to experience grief in that if it's an unknowing, it's a grief, it's an unknowing grief. So that's something where you come up against.   - Janice McRandal He'll do something. And he started babbling, Peter said. And some of that babble is saying, Mum, Mum, Mum or Dad, Dad, dad. And it's only very occasional and it's not it's it's not really directed at us. But even to hear that sound and it's very emotional experience. And and so then you suddenly aware of all this grief that you had suspended somewhere in the air and you didn't know you were doing that.   - Peter Kline Yeah. So it's it's unpredictable and it it hits you in unpredictable ways. And both I mean, I would say both the sort of both the joy and the grief of parenting. Leo, it unfolds in that kind of slow, unique time of itself, right? Yeah.   - Janice McRandal And it's so important for us to be able to hold that and care for that, but also to foster a relation to Leo, where he is always enough, wherever he is in any given day to to find a way to hold both of those things and give loving care to both of those things.   - Janice McRandal And they're the kind of conversations we have of how do we make room for all of that.   - Peter Kline And it feels part of the difficulties that Leo currently has a lot of therapy every week, you know, four or five therapy sessions every week with physio speech, occupational therapy. So it's a lot of this, you know, early intervention therapy working really hard to maximise this window of neuroplasticity to potentially allow him to develop as much as he possibly can. So there's this big emphasis on doing all of this, getting somewhere really and progressing.   - Peter Kline So and it's it's often I find it often difficult to feel like fully throwing yourself into that, which brings with it its own sense of guilt. And I'm never doing enough, never doing enough of working enough with them and never doing enough therapy outside of therapy hours with them and knowing the importance of that, but also trying to manage the responsibility and guilt that comes along with that while also also being clear on. But every day with him is a gift and every day is enough.   - Peter Kline That's it. It's it's holding those two things together that often feels very difficult, but that's kind of what we're given to manage.   - Liesel Mertes Now, how do you how do you help? Like both express to Leo and also express to yourself those moments of this is enough, like what does that look or feel like to you?   - Janice McRandal Yeah, I think one thing that's become more accessible for me at least, is talking to Leo and and talking to him in meaningful ways and feeling a sense of there's a window of communication that's definitely opened up, that that's a way of relating between us right now. So I'm able to talk to him and and he's able to communicate back to me in various ways. And that is just become such the last few months that that's opened up. It just feels like such a precious, beautiful gift and a way of us being present together in any given moment.   - Janice McRandal And it always feels enough. So I you know, it takes some time with people with disabilities to figure out how we going to communicate to each other because not him. May I come with all these assumptions about how that's going to work and happen and I have to break some of that down and learn new ways.   - Janice McRandal So he's been teaching us how to communicate with him and now that's opening up. And really, it's it feels like a very beautiful gift that allows that mode of being together.   - Peter Kline Yeah, I mean, it is just about finding ways every day to communicate the just the joy and enough ness, if you want to put it like that, of just being together. I mean, even even even in terms of the therapies that he has every day and his therapists are wonderful about this. It's all about making those those experiences playful, joyful experiences and and never, you know, and it's it's again, it's a balance between trying to push him in certain directions, but then also never thinking that you are expecting or requiring him to do anything at all.   - Peter Kline So it's about opening up spaces of playful opportunity to explore what he can do. And then what he and what he can do is wonderful, whatever that is. Yeah. So it's it's it's. Yeah. And just being with him in that, you know, just being just the, you know, just the sheer being with is enough.   - Liesel Mertes I feel like you're giving voice to what is an underlying reality and tension that is woven throughout any parenting relationship, which is, you know, how are you orienting with your expectation towards your child? And, you know, for people who have children who are not affected by disabilities, there there's this whole level of expectation that we feel like is, you know, societally or, you know, from a family level like these are right expectations that I need to have. But I will be pondering your words because I think that just the delight in being with someone just for who they are in that moment is actually such a full hearted gift that we are seeking in any relationship, but often so withholding and how we actually give that, especially to a woman, you know, in our preoccupied and frantic state of how parenting can be.   - Janice Kline Right. Absolutely. And I think that, you know, one of the things that and I you know, people with disabilities are not here to teach us lessons about ourselves. And so we have to go through that kind of thinking. But I think that one of the things I've experienced with Leo that I have not yet learned how to do with my other children is to get off myself, you know, to start projecting, as you said, my expectations or transference of or repetitions of all sorts of material onto my other children.   - Janice McRandal I think I experience that in a very different way with Leo. You and not me. And I am not you. We are two people that can actually be together and that opens up a whole the whole possibility of relation, and that has been at times quite wonderous. Hmm.   - Liesel Mertes I imagine in this journey you have needed the support of a community of people as you think about some of that intense, you know, first year where there was no sleeping and marginal eating into the stage that you are now. What have been some of the best ways that people have come alongside you and supported you in your journey?   - Janice McRandal Yeah, I think we mentioned when the weekend or the weekend before Leah was coming home from the special care unit, we were moving. So this is certainly memorable. Peter's colleagues and maybe some of my colleagues I can't remember, and also students of both of ours moved out like they moved our home.   - Janice McRandal They moved all their stuff and unpacked the cupboards in the kitchen and put together new furniture that we had purchased. And friends came and painted bedrooms for the older two children so that it would be special for them. So that was like that was a big mammoth effort that was such a practical help for support. The other memorable and very helpful practical things we had.   - Janice McRandal I mean, we must have had 100 meals cooked for us in the first year of Leo's life. I'm not exaggerating. A whole village just kept turning up to provide food for us. And that was super helpful in just a practical way to relieve the tension of those kind of daily tasks that seemed insurmountable, I would say. What do you think of Peter in terms of the support network that we experienced?   - Peter Kline We had some friends once pay for cleaner to come for a whole day here. That was wonderful. Yes, yes, yes.   - Peter Kline It just yeah, there's all that all those kind of practical necessities of just getting through the day and getting through the week and getting through the month. I think we were very grateful to have a nice community around us. Right. And then I guess there's just the there's just also the. And I would say, then it's the kind of circle of people then reduces, in terms of the people who can actually simply be present with you in more intimate ways about what's unfolding or what's going on, so, yes, they're probably key people in our lives who are, in various ways, able to simply share with us.   - Peter Kline And again, just even just again, it's about just being with. Right? In some ways. Just being with us, with us and what's what's going on. That's that's been super, super important.   - Liesel Mertes Hmm, what you manage that you mentioned, that smaller circle of people who are equipped to do that, which perhaps is a sideways way of easing in to the follow up question, which   - Liesel Mertes What are some of the things that people have done that have really set your teeth on edge where you think, oh, my gosh, like, just don't do this?   - Liesel Mertes If I could warn somebody off of these actions, these are bad ones or words.   - Peter Kline Yeah, I mean, there's been there's been a few, like, super unhelpful, upsetting, just like comments about about what Leo is going through, but we're going to be the one that sticks out in my mind is when we're right in the midst of of going through these hospitalizations with Leo and these worrying worrying about Leo's weight. You know, just like I think we received one comment about some a person said, oh, I wish I I wish I had that problem, meaning the problem of not gaining weight.   - Peter Kline Right. So, you know, it's it's like a at the time it was like a throwaway line, but it's one of those lines that end up like jabbing you and staying with you. And both Janice and I in various times just randomly will think back to that and just get upset about it again. Just this year, really.   - Janice McRandal And there were four or five people in our lives that continue to say this over and over. Is he'll get there. This child is not developing, I know something's wrong with started talking to the doctors. We're you know, we're trying this, his nutrients are being boosted. We're trying this. And people that just kept saying "You'll get there in the end, they all do. They all get there in the end", which, you know, is patently untrue.   - Janice McRandal Right. Not every like clearly that's untrue. And too, you're not hearing me. I wanted you to hear me in my pain and anxiety and fear right now. And, in order to make yourself feel better, you're just dismissing what I just said.   - Janice McRandal That one, it's still wounds me and still hurts me. These people, you know, the people that are still some people still in my life for professional reasons that I that just kept saying it over and over.   - Janice McRandal And it feels it feels very disappointing that that's the way they approached us. Yes.   - Liesel Mertes Yeah, and a profound sense of of not being heard and also just thinking exactly what you said observationally, that's not even true, right?   - Janice McRandal You actually, surely you know, that's untrue?. Like why? You know, so that was really that that was a source of great frustration. And it feels like, you know, a relationship look like, I don't know, I can ever get past that. Now that you kept saying that to me and I know it was more about you than me, but that really says to me we're not in the same mode of relating to each other.   - Peter Kline Yeah. Or that this particular challenge that we're going through is not one that you either want or can just travel with me through, right? Yeah, yeah.   - Janice McRandal So, you know, I think there's all sorts of people that said silly things that they regret, but they don't linger. Yeah. It's the people that just repeatedly found ways to dismiss you one way or another or to minimize or to extrapolate these hopeful future that everything was going to be OK. Yeah.   - Liesel Mertes If there is anyone listening who is in the midst of their own journey, whether it's cerebral palsy or a different diagnosis, that has caused them to have to reckon with a life that they would have with their child, that is not accessible and no one wanted it. What words would you offer to that person?   - Janice McRandal Well, I guess I would. I guess my first thought is about any and all feelings of thoughts are OK.   - Janice McRandal I hear that, like you, there's no right way to process through these griefs. And there's no. There's no feelings of loss that are shameful and there can be room for holding all of that. So, you know, I think we come into these experiences never expecting them even the most. The person who's thought through all the scenarios, you still there's never a deep level of expectation, there's no way there's no playbook on how to navigate it.   - Janice McRandal That and I mean, the follow up to that would be to talk to a good therapist, talk to somebody like that, make and find a space somewhere where all those that emotional material can come to the fore and be given attention and held and cared for.   - Janice McRandal And one of the things we noticed when there was in the special care nursery is all the women. Typically, it's mostly heterosexual couples, not it's a very normative sort of situation in there. And all the mothers would find each other typically in the room where they were expressing milk and tell their stories and grieve together. And the fathers would sit alone in the room and didn't know how to find each other.   - Janice McRandal So I think especially if you're in a in a, you know, heterosexual relationship, that especially men need to find ways to to talk and gather and tell their stories.   - Peter Kline Definitely. That would be one thing that stood out to us. That's it's something that I'm still still working through. But what is it what does it mean to have a support network around us and around me and around Leo? So, yeah, and that's what I would say is like, just be super intentional about building a support network that is not just like it's not just adequate, but that's that's really good.   - Peter Kline And I'm thinking in terms of I think of like the therapists that we work with weekly and daily, in terms of doctors, I think in terms of friends, I think there are they're really, really wonderful people out there that can form a support network, that can turn parenting a child with disabilities into like a joyful experience and not just something that you're having to suffer through, although there is a suffering through.   - Peter Kline That's part of it. But that's that. So that is part of making it a a flourishing experience. And I think that those people are out there, those particular therapists out there, those are there. And sometimes it takes a while to find them or to piece it all together. But I think it's possible. So I think just always pushing to. For a kind of quality of connectedness,   - Janice McRandal yeah, I think it's super important and also make sure that you're always working towards health care and disability services for all.   - Peter Kline That's right. That's right.   - Janice McRandal So we live in a country. That's right. And that's I would also say that, you know, like just, you know, growing up in America and moving to Australia, you know, and we have a it's called the NDIS, the National Disability Insurance Scheme. It's not perfect, but it's it is part of Medicare as a part of the universal universal it. But it is a huge support, you know, gets funded through that in a really wonderful way.   - Janice McRandal So everyone should be able to have equal access to choosing the therapeutic and medical teams that they need for a therapist with a disability or it's somebody in their family. So, yeah, there's all that look self care, but also fight the good fight. Stage a revolution.   - Liesel Mertes That's right. Yeah, I hear that the level of of advocacy that is still really important in that. Thank you for giving voice to that. Thank you. This has been such a full conversation, is there anything that, again, thank you for? I realize that the gift of anyone's time is one of, you know, the kind of things that they can give.   MUSICAL TRANSITION   Here are three take-aways from y conversation with Peter and Janice: Be very careful with clichés and looking on the bright side.People toss out trite phrases because they, themselves, are profoundly uncomfortable with pain.  And we rush people to a good conclusion because it makes us feel better.  Janice and Peter both commented how painful it was to have people assure them, again and again, that everything would be just fine with Leo.  There is a particular need for men to find and experience uplifting, emotionally accessible community as they go through hard times.This is a need for women as well but, as Janice mentioned, women are much more prone to find each other while men are off on their own. If you are a man listening to this episode, think of someone in your circle who is going through something hard.  Give them a call, send a text, check in to see how they are doing and offer support.  Support is both personal but there is also a structural aspect of supporting individuals and families that are not given equal access.The level of care and intervention and support services that Leo needs is large and expensive.  And we need systems that make those services available and accessible.  If you are interested in joining your voice to advocacy afforts, I have linked the Arc and the American Disabilities Advocates in the show notes.    The Arc:  https://thearc.org/ American Disabilities Advocates:  https://www.hrw.org/topic/disability-rights?gclid=Cj0KCQjwk8b7BRCaARIsAARRTL4kp445XLphPJlLKnomC3_s7JmukNkrcCBTZLAOIi0upuyJppuywdIaAt8cEALw_wcB

Ask Herbal Health Expert Susun Weed
Ask Herbal Health Expert Susun Weed and guest, Rev. Maggy Whitehouse

Ask Herbal Health Expert Susun Weed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 121:00


Susun Weed answers 90 minutes of herbal health questions followed by a 30 minute interview with guest, Rev. Maggy Whitehouse. Rev. Maggy Whitehouse is an independent sacramental minister (or Hedge Priest), a professional stand-up comedian and an expert and prolific author on Bible History and metaphysics. She began stand-up at the age of 56. Maggy has more than 30 years’ experience as a radio and television journalist and documentaries presenter and producer and was host moderator for the BBC’s Religion & Ethics message boards during the second Iraq war. Alan Bookbinder, head of BBC Religion and Ethics 2001-6 described her as ‘terrifying!’ She is the author of 17 published books including six on Judeo-Christian mysticism; China By Rail (Century 1988) and The Miracle Man, the story of what would happen if the Messiah returned today as a judge on America’s Got Talent. (The Miracle Man, O Books 2008). Maggy made it on to Wikipedia after writing a sensible book about Opus Dei at the time of all the palaver over The Da Vinci Code. She has been widowed, divorced and is now happily married to an astrologer which worries the Parish Council considerably. She has worked as a hospice chaplain, ridden on a Bengal tiger and survived a barracuda attack off the Barrier Reef. Both Maggy’s mother and her Bishop think she should get a proper job. Q & A topics in this episode include: fertility follow-uppost-menopausal sexual desirearnicaokraloss of energy after ovulationheart & bone health follow-up psychosis after having COVID 19

Boiling Point
Great Barrier Reef: Good news!

Boiling Point

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2020


The new Boiling Point podcast is out! Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. It is time for some good news. We have heard some pretty dire predictions about the state of the Barrier Reef, driven by bleach events, ocean acidification, runoffs, microplastics. But fresh from the water we have returning guest Associate Prof.  David Suggett (UTS) to […]

Ain't It Rich
Episode 121 - The Impact of James Cook (w/ Mick McConnell & Doony)

Ain't It Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2020 77:15


this week Aria Salan and Mickey Flykick are joined by Mick McConnell and Doony to learn about the Endeavour's journey 250 years ago and how badly it screwed with the people living here.  We discuss the governments plan to celebrate something the Endeavour never did, James Cook's namby-pamby nature and discuss the birth of the Barrier Reef. If only Scott Morrison had the same Hawaiian experience as Captain Cook...   Please subscribe to our Patreon at www.patreon.com/aintitrich this week we're releasing our first ten dollar episode for the year! Mickey's Show: https://www.standup.com.au/event/josh-wessling-mickey-flykick-echo-chamber-sit-down-comedy-fringe-festival-2020

The History Hour
'Jane' - the underground abortion service

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2019 48:44


The feminist network that performed illegal abortions in the 1960s in Chicago, the Algerian nationals who fought alongside the French in Algeria’s war of independence and when Margaret Thatcher first expressed anti- Europe sentiment. Plus the Paris hotel that hosted Holocaust survivors at the end of the Second World War and the battle to protect the Barrier Reef. Photo courtesy of Martha Scott

Barrier Reef Podcast
#6 Twenty One PilotsとAimerと音楽で成功する話

Barrier Reef Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2019 49:32


Podcast6回目の放送。本日も車内からの収録。 ラジオブースでの収録に憧れを馳せつつ、『音楽の聴き方の一つとして時代背景やバックボーンを交えるのは超大切』という話から、『音楽で成功するためにレクチャーされたタブーな行動』の話まで、本来あるべき音楽の方向性についてリスナー/プレイヤー双方の視点で『深そうで深くない話』をお送りします。新垣結衣の『Heavenly Days』の話から『Twenty One Pilots』に繋がっていく話は圧巻。 /04:14 Twenty One Pilots /11:33 時代背景やバックボーンを交えるのは超大切 /12:39 音楽で成功するためにレクチャーされたタブーな行動 /15:32 CRCK/LCKS /26:28 Aimer /36:08 Kid Fresino /40:20 Coinsidensについて /このPodcastで紹介した音楽はnoteでも公開しています。 https://note.mu/barrierreef、または[Barrier Reef ノート]で検索してみてください。

Coral bleaching how it’s effecting the barrier reef
Coral bleaching how it’s effecting the barrier reef

Coral bleaching how it’s effecting the barrier reef

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2019 2:36


Some shocking facts and other information.

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟

更多英语知识,请关注微信公众号:VOA英语每日一听Todd: So, Rebecca, in Australia you have the Great Barrier Reef. Now have you been to the Great Barrier Reef?Rebecca: Yes, I have once, probably about two years ago. There's the main part of the Great Barrier Reef and then there's a little island, and we went to the island because I don't like scuba diving, so I didn't go to the main part.Todd: So, you don't like scuba diving. Why?Rebecca: I think it's the unknown, under the water, and just being confined and having this breathing apparatus on you.Todd: Right. Well, you know what,I can relate because I was certified to be a diver because all my friends were divers and I didn't enjoy it that much either.Rebecca: Yeah. Like, it looks great underwater when you see it on TV and it would be awesome to see it, but yeah, I just can't get past the going underwater and not being able breathe properly.Todd: Right. Right. Actually, I think for me was I went with my friends and they were so excited about it and then when you would go underwater, you're in pairs. You have a buddy and it seemed like you were kind of in line in an amusement park or something, you know.Rebecca: Really.Todd: Yeah, like everybody kind of has to go around and you look around and you see all these other divers and... but I was the only person that felt this way. Everybody else loves diving and the photography so. But actually, is it true the Barrier Reef is being damaged? It's actually not as beautiful as used to be?Rebecca: Yeah. It's... The name of it is coral bleaching, and the coral is actually turning white, now rather than having the colors it has, so that's been happening for a few years I think and it's getting worse and worse.Todd: Oh, so basically the coral is losing it's beautiful color?Rebecca: Yeah, yeah, basically, just dies and can't be brought back.Todd: Well, what about, like you know, the marine life, like you know fish and stuff like that? Is that still abundant?Rebecca: I assume that would probably go down as well once the coral starts to die off because that is the food source and their housing for the fish so with the loss of the Great Barrier Reef you also lose all the beautiful fish and marine life down there too.Todd: That's too bad.

Beating Around The Bush
S2E3 - Bob Katters brown bag, concerns over Reef Regs, the APVMA and drama over science in 60 minutes.

Beating Around The Bush

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2019 31:58


This week in your rural news; Bob Katter and his brown paper bag, the Great Barrier Reef Regs Bill puts blanket restrictions on Qld farmers, 60 minutes goes for drama over science.LinksA true story https://www.atruestory.com.au/https://www.facebook.com/atruestoryqld/60 minuteshttps://www.9now.com.au/60-minutes/2019/extras/clips/clip-ck0ancxmt001j0qpooh7tfbughttps://www.croplife.org.au/media/media-releases/60-minutes-tv-program-on-glyphosate-discussion-must-be-based-on-facts-and-science/https://www.graincentral.com/news/wa-farmers-condemn-60-minutes-portrayal-of-glyphosate/Reef Regshttps://agforceqld.org.au/reef-regs-impacts#whathttps://www.qff.org.au/presidents-column/balance-needed-reef-policies/Antarctic Warminghttps://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-06/rare-weather-event-over-antarctica-drives-hot-outlook/11481498APVMA Reviewhttps://minister.agriculture.gov.au/McKenzie/media-releaseshttps://southburnett.com.au/news2/2019/09/06/ag-chemical-laws-to-be-reviewed/Reach out if you need helphttps://www.lifeline.org.au/https://www.virtualpsychologist.com.au/https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/national-help-lines-and-websitesFollow Us:Join the Rural Business Collective community and join the conversation over at Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ruralbusinesscollective/Beating Around the Bush is the podcast of the Rural Business Collective www.ruralbusinesscollective.com.auThis is a Cahoots Radio production edited by Skye Manson www.cahootsradio.comHosted by Wade Dabinett https://www.linkedin.com/in/wade-dabinett-947763167/ and Fleur Anderson https://www.linkedin.com/in/fleuranderson/Let us know your favourite news stories for the week on email - podcasts@ruralbusinesscollective.com.au

英语每日一听 | 每天少于5分钟

更多英语知识,请关注微信公众号: VOA英语每日一听Todd: Hey, Rebecca, can you talk a little bit about Australia and just your thoughts about your home country?Rebecca: I guess I spend most of my time in Sydney, but one of the things l really love about Sydney is that it's very multicultural, so it's an interesting place to live because every day you can meet people from all around the world and on the bus going to work you can hear maybe five or six different languages around you. You can eat food from lots of different places and of course, you can talk to people with all different sorts of points of view, different backgrounds. I think it's exciting for that reason.Todd: So you're saying that Australia is basically a very multicultural place. Is this mainly just in the cities or is this all around Australia?Rebecca: Well, to be honest, that is mostly just the cities. I guess the other really big thing I like about Australia is its nature. Australia is a very clean and beautiful place. It has a true wilderness, which is not very common in some countries in the world. You can go places and you will see nobody. I really do mean nobody. I love that, so you can go to a beach and you can be the only person there.Todd: Actually, speaking of nature, you know, when you think of Australia you think of the Barrier Reef or maybe the jungles up north or like the desert in the middle. What landscapes have you been to?Rebecca: Um, I'm really lucky actually because when I was a kid my parent took me out of school for a few months and we traveled all around Australia in a van so I got to see all different kinds of landscapes in Australia: desert, Barrier Reef, mountains, forests, anything, yeah, but actually most of Australia is desert so I've seen a lot of deserts.Todd: If you had to choose, besides Sydney where you're from, your favorite place in Australia, where would it be?Rebecca: Mm, that's difficult. Probably somewhere with an island and a beautiful beach. Maybe not too many people but somewhere where I could go scuba-diving or snorkeling. That would be great.Todd: OK, and where are the best beaches in Australia?Rebecca: Everywhere. We've got so many you couldn't count them all. Yeah, Sydney has some lovely beaches but most of Australia has a coast so all the way around you can find a beach anywhere.

Skein Enable Podcast
Ep. 88 - Turn Off Your Phone!

Skein Enable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2019


I finished things!  After the end credits I do a full spoilers review of Avengers: Endgame, so make sure to turn it off if you don't want to hear it!What I Finished:Jill redid the neckline and finished her Ixchel by Catherine Clark out of Sweet Sparrow Yarns Gosling in Dusty Rose and Magpie in Butterbeer.  Her Rav page is here.  She also finished her Marklee by Elizabeth Doherty out of Invictus Yarns Reward in the Contemplate colorway.  Her Rav page is here.  She also did a bit of spinning.  She finished 4oz of a 80/20 SW Merino/Silk from Capistrano Fiber Arts in the Barrier Reef colorway.My Current Fix:Jill did a little bit more work on her Butterfly/Papillon shawl by Marin Melchior using Uneek Fingering in 3007 and Cherry Tree Hill Sock in Burgundy but isn't sold on the color combination so might start over with a different contrast color.  She then started a Fox Paws by Xandy Peters using Knit Picks Palette in the colorways Edamame, Clarity, Silver, Huckleberry Heather, and Seafaring.  She debated making it into a cropped top, but will probably just continue on with it as a shawl.  Her Rav page here.  She cast on an Annex tank top by Norah Gaughan from the Framework book from Quince & Co. out of HempforKnitting AllHemp6 in the Augbergine colorway.  She also spun up half of a BFL braid from Bee Mice Elf in the Finale colorway.What I'm Jonesing For:Jill loves the colorwork yoke sweater Birdsong by Maschenwunder Manja Vogelsang.  She wants to make the summer top Greco by Courtney Spainhower from Pom Pom Quarterly Issue 13.  Jill has a couple crochet favorites from the most recent PomPom Quarterly, Water Clover and Davallia by Isa Catepillan.  She favorited a couple sock patterns, the free Pizza Party Socks by Emma Kerian and the XO Socks by Leeni Hoi.  She likes the complicated Knitted Shawl Autumn Lace by Svetlana Gordon.Uppers, Downers and Miscellaneous Links:Celia McAdam CahillLeading Men Fiber ArtsHuntington Library and Botanical Gardens Greater Los Angeles Spinning GuildAvengers: End Game (2019)Pen15 on HuluVenom (2018)Hunter (1984-1991)Bosch on AmazonProject RunwayBetter Call Saul Season 2The Ghost WhispererThe LeftoversMen Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Skein Enable Podcast
Ep. 84 - They Don't Look Like That At All

Skein Enable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2019


It's getting harder to find a funny line to make the episode title! My Current Fix:Jill is working on her Ixchel by Catherine Clark out of Sweet Sparrow Yarns Gosling in Dusty Rose and Magpie in Butterbeer.  She was trying to do the sleeve colorwork in intarsia, but is going to do it again in plain stockinette with duplicate stitch instead.  She just split for the armholes in her Pop Crop Cardi by Ambah O'Brien and Lobelia by Meghan Fernandes mash-up out of Jessie's handspun.  Jessie spun the 3-ply yarn out of two plies of natural merino, and one ply from a Mork Made Fiber Co batt.  The cropped cardigan is for Jessie's wedding.  Jill swatched for Marklee by Elizabeth Doherty in Invictus Yarns Reward in the color Contemplate.  She also did a little bit of spinning with Capistrano Fiber Arts 80/20 Merino/Tussah Silk roving in "Barrier Reef". What I'm Jonesing For:Jill is into the Alaska sweater by Camille Descoteaux and the Oshun pullover by Christina Danaee.  She also likes the Vela Shawl by Shara Made.  Jill wants to get a jump start on the holidays with the Hello Winter! by Calle del Limon ornament and the Slice of Pizza Ornament by Michele Wilcox.  She's also going to participate in the Gnome MKAL by Sarah Schira.Re-Ups:Goodie Supply CoUppers, Downers and Miscellaneous Links:UCLA Festival of PreservationMary Poppins Returns (2018)Green Book (2018)Roma (2018)Monk The Ghost WhispererTrue Detective Season 3YouBreaking In (2018)Lorena on AmazonDuo Lingo appVox article on Racism: "The knitting community is reckoning with racism" by Jaya Saxena

Beyond Zero - Community
Beyond Zero - Community

Beyond Zero - Community

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2018


Mon 5th March 2018BULGA to BYLONG- Locking the Gates This is an audio voyage up the Hunter Valley where brave communities are holding out against climate changing coal expansions.We meet:     Wannarua Elder- Pat Hansson     Ex Miner- Frank Turnbull     Community Leader – John Krey     Local Historian – Stewart Mitchell     Goldman Prize Winner – Wendy Bowman     Veteran Campaigner – Bev Smiles     Bylong Grazier – Peter Grieve AO     Guide at The Drip – Phyllis Setchell     Environmental Justice- Dr James Whelan     Lock the Gates Guides – Steve Phillips and Nic Clyde    The Bulga Community is famous for having taken Rio Tinto to court and won!     The extension of the mine was prohibited by the Supreme Court. Aboriginal sacred places and significant woodlands were protected. But their victory was short lived as the head of Rio made a special trip from London and the NSW Government promptly changed the law. Pat Hansson told us how sickened she was by the thought of the massive Warkworth Mine swallowing up more land. This area has great significance for Wonnarua People. They used to gather for Bora Ring ceremonies witnessed by European settlers but going back for untold generations. I interviewed these brave people last year when they were out protesting the sale of a road which stands between the Rio mine (now Yancoal) and the next big coal lode. Local Historian Stewart Mitchell explains how this is part of the Great North Road built by convicts and part of our National heritage while John Krey and Frank Turnbull dramatise for us why they are not giving up.      This local battle has global importance. As fossil fuels are consigned to history the people have Bulga have stood firm, fought fair and must win. This is their finest hour.      At Camberwell we met a farmer who is recognised internationally. Wendy Bowman tells of their thriving dairy farm which was made impossible by the encroaching coal mine. Despite being offered millions by Yancoal she is the last farm in the path of the mine and determined that her place will be protected. She was recognised by the Goldman Environmental Prize in 2017 https://www.goldmanprize.org/recipient/wendy-bowman/ You can join Wendy in demanding that politicians stop allowing mining to destroy rural communities. http://www.lockthegate.org.au/stop_the_coal_land_rush      The next ghost town was Wollar where only four families are between the mine and its extension. Bev Smiles and two others face seven years jail if tough new anti coal protest laws prevail. She talked to the listening tour as we gazed around at empty houses, a church and school, the services all still intact but most of the residents bought out by Peabody Energy. From Wollar we had a police escort . Maybe they thought we’d stop the bus and riot!      We bushwalked around the Great Dripping wall which will be at risk if the tunnels under the river are approved. You can join the Save the Drip campaign by contacting Phyllis Setchell at prpatita500@gmail.com      The end of the tour was in Bylong Valley. Gag Clauses prevented land owners talking to us about any negotiations with Korean Energy Company Kepco. They have bought up most of the property in this pristine valley but no sod has yet been turned Peter Grieve AO spoke to us of the old days when the Mouse races raised a million dollars for charity. The champion racehorse and sire HEROIC was born here and the land is perfect for high end farming.       Peter Andrew trialled his natural sequence farming here. http://tarwynpark.com/ His ideas to rehydrate the land and restore it have caught on around the continent but we saw men in high vis vests now in command at Tarwyn park and mine machinery parked in his sheds. It could become part of the National Trust instead of another grand canyon of coal.      It’s a climate cliff hanger for all of us. We can measure the amount of carbon dioxide pouring into the atmosphere. We can see the effects in the Antarctic, the Arctic and the Ocean but can we stop a new coal mine in a valley that looks like Switzerland? As poet Judith Wright said about the plans to drill for oil in the Barrier Reef and use the coral for limestone. It is like destroying the Taj Mahal for road rubble. But she was vindicated . It is now protected by UNESCO as world heritage.      Bylong, Wollar,Camberwell and Bulga. They are our call. 05 Mar 2018|Categories: Community Show

Pricey for Breakfast - Triple M Townsville 102.3

Pricey spoke to our PM, Malcolm Turnbull on Tuesday about the Barrier Reef funding, water and hole stack more. If you missed it, hear it here

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore
1291: Maryam Henein On How Systemic Pesticides Are Killing The Bees And Making Us Sick

The Livin' La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2017 34:32


Investigative journalist, activist, and award-winning documentary film director Maryam Henein is our guest today in Episode 1291 of The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore! [powerpress] Were you aware that this year marks a decade since Colony Collapse Disorder was first reported, and yet bees continue to die worldwide like never before? This problem was highlighted in the award-winning documentary film, narrated by Ellen Page, and directed by investigative journalist and activist Maryam Henein from VanishingBees.com. Now the systemic pesticides involved in this crisis are not only killing honeybees, but also native bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and earthworms. They have been found in our waterways, soil, and even our brains. Even Greece is losing their bees. The enormous systemic pesticides industry generates upward of 2.9 billion for companies like Bayer and Syngenta, which and are the most popularly used in the world. These harmful and pervasive pesticides are now causing damage to the Barrier Reef, too. Research now finds that these nicotine-based (neonic) neurotoxins damage sea urchin DNA and suppress the immune systems of crabs. Listen in today as Jimmy talks with Documentary directory Maryam Heinen about this pervasive problem and how it not only affects the bee population as well as how these insidious chemicals have now permeated every facet of our lives.

St Columbans Mission
The Far East (June 2017) - The Great White Barrier Reef

St Columbans Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2017 8:22


Corals are colonies of tiny sea-animals, polyps which attach to rocks, dividing… Narrated by John Doherty

Shirtloads of Science
Marine Permaculture (Brian von Herzen) (29)

Shirtloads of Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2017 20:08


Imagine cooling down 2,300 km of Barrier Reef along the Australian coast using renewable energy. Mind-blowing, right? Dr Brian Von Herzen has such a plan. It's part of a bigger picture that he calls Marine Permaculture - using nature to restore habitat in the oceans. It is a project he has been working towards for over a decade including demonstrations off Hawaii.  Dr Karl discussed Dr Brian's vision in Queensland earlier this year. The audio quality varies as it was recorded on location.

TheRidingHighPodcast
Episode 10: The Riding High Podcast

TheRidingHighPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2017 41:05


Check out Episode 10. This week we chat about Mikes progression towards the Myriad festival and his Q&A and developing RecFinder. Tynan is stoked to have his voice coming back after the previous weeks travels chased him down, he prepares for a return to toastmasters. Mike goes on a another rant this week over the Barrier Reef and the bleaching stuff going on. Download Subscribe Review - Be Awesome https://www.facebook.com/ridinghighpodcast/ theridinghighpodcast@gmail.com

Skuff TV - Off Cuts
Brinkley's Whitsundays

Skuff TV - Off Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2017 7:16


The Islands of OZ - raw, moody, beautiful, dramatic and totally unique to Australia. Summersite is embarking on a lifestyle film and photo odyssey exploring our rare and magnificent Islands of OZ. Brinkley Davies explores the Great Barrier Reef in the Whitsundays Islands, Queensland featuring Billabong Womens Australia. "Flying into and over the Whitsundays is totally surreal. You can see almost all of the 74 islands that make up the Whitsunday archipelago, the water is so clear and you can see all these little hidden gems of beaches. Water baby and marine biologist Brinkley Davies joined us for our Summersite Whitsunday Odyssey to dive the Barrier Reef and explore these "hidden gems” throughout the Whitsundays. Over a few days we dived the Barrier Reef, took a seaplane out to Heart Reef and Whitehaven Beach and then jumped on our own catamaran to sail through and explore the islands. Brinkley loved it and it was so great to hear her knowledge on what marine habitat we were seeing at the Barrier Reef and in the water around the Islands. We scuba dived the wall along Hardy Reef and saw lots of marine life including a Green Sea Turtle, Hump head Wrasse, Angel fish, Giant Trevally, and a couple of sneak Nudibranchs. We also visited the reef pontoon where we free-dived and found a giant clam and some beautiful anemones - this was my favourite part of the reef that day." "The Sea Plane to Whitehaven Beach and Heart Reef might have been the coolest thing I have ever done . . . Seeing the Great Barrier Reef from this perspective is something that I wish everyone had the opportunity to do. Its so unique in its formation and the colour scheme that naturally glows everywhere you look is really indescribable." Brinkley Davies @brinkleydavies #thisisqueensland #lovewhitsundays #whitsundayodyssey #summersitejourneys - - Credits Featuring // @Brinkleydavies and @davefrim Fashion // @billabong_womens_australia Film and Edit // Jampal Williamson @saltywings Aerial Cinematography // Michael Goetze @saltywings Music // @jimmy2sox Creative Producer // Jon laurenson @summersite #Islandsofoz #summersitejourneys Location @whitsundaysqld @queensland _ _ About Summersite #islandsofOZ The Islands of OZ - raw, moody, beautiful, dramatic and totally unique to Australia. Summersite is embarking on a lifestyle film and photo odyssey exploring our rare and magnificent Islands of OZ.

ShEvo vs. The First World | A Skeptical Look at Western Culture
Flying the Awesome Barrier Reef & Skype Through The Ages [Season 2, Episode 6]

ShEvo vs. The First World | A Skeptical Look at Western Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2015 20:13


Hello vicarious travelers and welcome to Brisbane, Australia! We’ve been in Australia for just over a month and, as some of you have noticed, have been awfully quiet on Periscope. Where we were doing five or six scopes a day in Thailand, it’s down to two to three times a week. Yikes! It seems that connectivity is to blame. In Airlie Beach, the cell signal isn’t the highest quality. And to top it off, the cheap smartphone Evo bought to replace his iPhone (the worst phone for any long-term international traveler) is just that: cheap. It may have a quad core processor, but it doesn’t play well with the Periscope app. And that kinda sucks. But we think we have a workaround, and we’ll start implementation of that right away. Because we’re jonesing to do more live video for you from our travels around the world! We share two travel stories on today’s program, one from Australia and one from Thailand: 1. Flying the Awesome Barrier Reef Music credit: RetroFuture by Kevin MacLeod It’s called the Great Barrier Reef for a reason. We debated boating to the reef, but decided to fly instead. As you’ll hear and perhaps see, that was the right decision. Because it’s big. Really, really big! Since Evo screwed up the Periscope (which, in hindsight, probably wouldn’t have worked all that well), we sat down and shared our thoughts after we got back on terra firma. 2. Skype Through The Ages Music credit: Quirky Dog by Kevin MacLeod Cassie, a music professor from California now based in Bangkok, and Evo are a bad combination. Throw in a gallon or two of wine and stick microphones in their faces, and interesting things will develop. This time, the topic of keeping up with friends and family when you’re living abroad came up. All praise the magic of Skype! And let’s work on the camera positioning, generation before us! (It makes you wonder what technological marvel we’ll screw up in a few years time, huh?) And that’s the show! This week we’re hanging out with our friends, Steve and Emily, in Brisbane before we start our house sit assignment. We’re having such a great time in Australia and look forward to sightseeing in the Brisbane area! Special thanks to  Kevin MacLeod of Incompetech.com (http://incompetech.com/)  for our theme music Upbeat Forever and all of the music used in this episode. Funding for this podcast and all the great content we produce is made possible by listeners just like you. Visit ShEvo.wtf/postcards to pledge your support, and get a hand written postcard each month as we travel abroad. Additional funding provided by TravelSmith. Inspiring people to go places they've never been, and keeping us looking smart and well-outfitted on our journey. And if you want to travel the world… it’s cheaper than you think! Visit  Housesitting (http://shevo.wtf/)  link to find out exactly how we afford to travel the world in style

Wildlife Martin Cohen – Richard Dinnen
ABC FAR NORTH WILDLIFE MAN LAUNCHES NEW GUIDE TO BARRIER REEF CREATURES

Wildlife Martin Cohen – Richard Dinnen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2013


Our ABC Far North wildlife correspondent Martin Cohen is once again a published author – and if you’re thinking about a trip to the Great Barrier Reef, take a copy of his latest book with you. Martin launched 101 Animals of the Great Barrier Reef […] The post ABC FAR NORTH WILDLIFE MAN LAUNCHES NEW GUIDE TO BARRIER REEF CREATURES appeared first on Richard Dinnen.

DMS Music Podcasting
MEBCI Performance and Judges Comments-Barrier Reef

DMS Music Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2008 4:42


Just Shoot It: A Podcast about Filmmaking, Screenwriting and Directing
Confessions of a Sundance/Slamdance Programmer w Drea Clark - Just Shoot It 170

Just Shoot It: A Podcast about Filmmaking, Screenwriting and Directing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 1969 34:31


This week we have on Drea Clark, producer and programmer extraordinaire! For thirteen years she was the Head of Feature Programming at Slamdance, and now she programs for Sundance. Today she talks about the many do's and don't's of applying to these top festivals, as well as how years of festival experience has helped her pick projects to produce. If you like what you hear in this episode, you can check out Drea's podcasts, "Who Shot Ya?" (https://maximumfun.org/shows/who-shot-y) and "Ticklish Business" (https://ticklishbusiness.podbean.com/).    This week we also brought back our Callsheet segment, where we talk about hidden jobs in the filmmaking industry. Todays guest is Elena White, who writes commercials treatments for directors bidding on commercial jobs.    Visit Plotdevices.Co to get your very own story clock workbook and other awesome filmmaking tools. Follow and tag them on twitter and Instagram @plotdevicesco with your favourite shot in all of cinema (we'll hold you to it)! Our favorite will gets our big blowout giveaway. Tweet us  to win a Storyboard Notebook, Storyclock Notebook, Storyclock Workbook, Choice of pin, choice of pennant. And if you don't win, you can always save 20% with JSIPOD20 at check out.     UNPAID ENDORSEMENTS Drea - Google Maps does an underwater street view of the Barrier Reef in Australia  Matt - "It's Been Too Long" short film http://www.ambermakes.tv/short-film-its-been-too-long/2019/5/29/its-been-too-long Oren - Stay Tuned With Preet podcast. "Laws of Language" episode, released June 6th Contribute to the Just Shoot It Patreon and help support the show: www.patreon.com/JustShootItPodAsalways, follow @MrMattEnlow (www.twitter.com/MrMattEnlow) and Oren @SmiteyPieLeg(www.twitter.com/SmiteyPieLeg) on twitter. For more episodes visit www.JustShootitPodcast.comShow your support: rate and review us on iTunes. apple.co/2fl9ojySee who are guests are a week early on our instagram @JustshootItPod(www.instagram.com/justshootitpod/) Send feedback to @justshootitpod or justshootitpod@gmail.com or Call us at (262) 6-SHOOT-1, and we’ll air your voicemail on the show! Music was provided by the free music archive and by Jahzzar. Just Shoot It is a podcast about directing, filmmaking and storytelling. Each week we interview your directors, screenwriters, editors, cinematographers, and actors, and learn how they became successful, working content creators. We’re all about getting off your butt and making your own videos. We’ll share tips and stories of how people in the entertainment industry forced their ways into sustainable careers. Matt Enlow is a director working in comedy. His website is mrmattenlow.com Oren Kaplan is a director and VFX artist who has directed the theatrical feature, The Hammer, a Lifetime movie, and countless branded content videos. His website is directedbyoren.com Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/just-shoot-it-a-podcast-about-filmmaking-screenwriting-and9776/donations