Podcasts about name normal

  • 108PODCASTS
  • 457EPISODES
  • 1h 8mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Sep 27, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about name normal

Latest podcast episodes about name normal

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 637 (9-26-22): Many Tree Tales are Told in “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest”

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:40).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-23-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 26 and October 3, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. SOUND – ~6 sec That call of Mountain Chorus Frogs opens an episode where we learn about the video podcast series, “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.”  Started in April 2020, the video series is produced by the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, conducted by Virginia Cooperative Extension.  As of September 9, 2022, the series included 82 episodes, covering topics such as tree identification, forest soils, invasive plants, forest management, tree syrups, and weird trees.  Several episodes are on specific water-related topics, like the Mountain Chorus Frogs you heard earlier.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to excerpts from five of those episodes.  SOUNDS and VOICES  - 1 min./29 sec “Hi everyone.  Welcome to ‘Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.'  I'm Jennifer Gagnon with the Forest Landowner Education Program at Virginia Tech.  And today I'm joining you from Claytor Lake State Park in southwest Virginia.”  From “Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022. “This is a vernal pool in Claytor Lake State Park.  ...This pool at its largest is probably an acre in size.  This pool is big enough that it has Painted Sliders, we saw a Snapping Turtle in here, we have a Green Heron out here.  ...There's all kinds of animals. ...It's a beautiful pool.”  From “Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022.  “Our topic today is going to be about water quality.  And this ties in nicely with forestry.”  From “Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020. Today we're going to take a look at some of the best management practices that loggers and forestry operations can take in order to protect water quality.”  From “Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020. “One of the reasons we're studying Mountain Chorus Frogs is we're really trying to get a good idea of their distribution in Virginia.”  From “Mountain Chorus Frogs,” Episode 75, April 2022. “Hey everyone.  My name is Wally Smith, and I'm an associate professor of biology at UVA-Wise.  And we are here on the banks of the Clinch River in St. Paul, Virginia, today to talk about the Eastern Hellbender, which is one of our most unique amphibians here in Virginia and the central Appalachians.”  From “Eastern Hellbenders,” Episode 68, January 2022. “Well thank for spending fifteen minutes in the creek with us, and thanks to Sally for for spending time with us outside to share her knowledge about water quality.  And I hope you join us for another edition of ‘Fifteen Minutes in the Forest.'  Have a great weekend.”  From “How Clean is Your Creek,” Episode 26, November 2020. When COVID shut-downs began in 2020, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education team started the series as a way to stay engaged with clients.  To the team's surprise, the series became very popular.  Among the users are public school teachers, foresters, landowners, and other lovers of the outdoors. Along with the “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” series, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program offers other short courses, conferences and workshops, Fall Forestry and Wildlife Field Tours, and retreats for beginning woodland owners.  For more information about these learning opportunities, search online for the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, or phone Jennifer Gagnon at (540) 231-6391. Thanks to Ms. Gagnon for permission to use excerpts of “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes.  And for a closing forest-and-water word, we end with a comment from Andrew Vinson, of the Virginia Department of Forestry, from the episode on best management practices for water quality. VOICE - ~4 sec - “Remember, healthy forests produce clean water.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation and the Virginia Cooperative Extension's Forest Landowner Education Program, for her help with this episode and for permission to excerpts of “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes.  The full series is available online at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOhBz_SGRw8UZo9aAfShRbb-ZaVyk-uzT.  Excerpts heard in this episode of Virginia Water Radio were taken from the following “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” episodes:“Best Management Practices for Water Quality,” Episode 19, September 2020;“Eastern Hellbenders,” Episode 68, January 2022;“How Clean is Your Creek,” Episode 26, November 2020;“Mountain Chorus Frogs,” Episode 75, April 2022;“Vernal Pools,” Episode 74, April 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com.IMAGES Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 19, “Best Management Practices for Water Quality.”Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 59, “The S Curve of Forest Carbon.”Screenshot from the opening of the video for “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” Episode 68, “Eastern Hellbenders.” SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/.  The “Fifteen Minutes in the Forest” program and other short course programs are available online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/landownerprograms/shortcourses/online.html. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Plants+%26+Trees&fieldGuideHabitat=. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. James P. Engel, “Shrubs in the Understory,” February 2012, online at http://www.whiteoaknursery.biz/essays/ShrubsinUnderstory.shtml. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” prepared by N. Robert Nuss, and reviewed and revised by Scott Guiser and Jim Smellmer, October 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Virginia Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac –

covid-19 relationships university earth education college voice water state change zoom living land sound research ms tech government benefits search north america modern tales environment started normal natural web dark va humans tree rain disease climate change ocean voices snow types citizens agency trees stream priority plants biology environmental bay ash images dynamic grade bio conservation soil resource index charlottesville processes pond signature virginia tech arial asheville appalachian accent atlantic ocean life sciences screenshots natural resources maple forests excerpts adaptations compatibility colorful forestry populations msonormal ls times new roman sections aquatic poison ivy civics watershed organisms gagnon freshwater chesapeake wg policymakers forest service water quality earth sciences shenandoah photosynthesis shrubs acknowledgment university press cosgrove cambria math style definitions worddocument virginia department stormwater saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr msonormaltable latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin wrapindent rmargin defjc intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused fifteen minutes latentstyles table normal bmp forest management name title name strong name emphasis name normal name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference s curve living systems grades k biotic space systems name e waterside cumberland gap name list light accent dark accent colorful accent rhododendrons snapping turtle name date name plain text name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table understory penn state extension best management practices forest resources name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention ben cosgrove audio notes msobodytext stormwater runoff water center uva wise tmdl how clean virginia standards
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 636 (9-12-22): Two Shorebirds That Stand Out on Their Yellow Legs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-9-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 12 and September 19, 2022. SOUNDS – ~2 sec – short examples of calls by Greater Yellowlegs (first) and Lesser Yellowlegs (second). In this episode, we feature two shorebirds whose long, colorful legs are a distinctive mark.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds and see if you can guess the name shared by these two species that's based on that characteristic.  And here's a hint: the name rhymes with what a person eats when they get two scrambled for breakfast. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec If you guessed yellowlegs, you're right!  You heard, first, the Greater Yellowlegs, and second, the Lesser Yellowlegs.  Both are known as “marsh sandpipers” or simply “marshpipers” because they're in the family of shorebirds called sandpipers and they prefer marshes or other wetland habitats.  Greater Yellowlegs are also sometimes called “tattlers” because of their noisy alarm calls.  The two species are the only tall sandpipers in North America with legs colored bright yellow or sometimes orange.  They're distinguished from one another by the somewhat larger size of the Greater Yellowlegs, by that species' bigger and slightly upturned bill, and by differences between their calls.  Both species breed in the tundra or forests of Canada and Alaska, and both then migrate to spend winter in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, or South America.  The Lesser Yellowlegs is typically found in Virginia only during migration, but the Greater Yellowlegs can be found wintering along Virginia's coast.  These birds hunt in shallow water and on mud flats for their prey of fish, frogs, and a variety of invertebrate animals, such as insects, worms, snails, and shrimp. If you're visiting coastal Virginia between fall and spring and you're watching the birds, here's hoping you encounter some yellow-legged ones wading in shallow waters to find their food. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the yellowlegs' sounds, from the Stokes' Field Guide to Bird Songs, and we let the Greater Yellowlegs have the last call. SOUNDS – ~5 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds of the Greater Yellowlegs and Lesser Yellowlegs were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Greater Yellowlegs, photographed at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia, August 11, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user kenttrulsson, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/132685927(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Lesser Yellowlegs, at Virginia Beach, Va., May 3, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user hikerguy150, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/116695303(as of 9-12-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS The following information is excerpted from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. “Mixed assemblages of small shorebirds combing our coastal wetlands in spring are likely to be accompanied by several yellowlegs, immediately recognizable by their greater size. As the “peeps” scurry over the mud and along the waters edge, the yellowlegs, with a more careful, heron-likeelegance, wade out into ponds and sloughs in search of different prey.“General description: Yellowlegs can be distinguished from other shorebirds by the long, straight oralmost imperceptibly upturned bill and the very long, bright yellow legs.  The neck is longer and moreslender than that of most shorebirds. ...Distinguishing betweenthe two...species of yellowlegs is more difficult.  Plumage of the two birds is nearly identical.  None of the following distinctions are completely reliable by themselves, and if possible they should be used in conjunction with each other.  When seen together, as often occurs in migration, the greater yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) stands9-10 inches high (0.25 m), taller than the lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes).  The greater yellowlegs has a somewhat thicker bill than the lesser, and it may turn upward very slightly, while that of the lesser yellowlegs is slighter and quite straight.  The calls of the two species are distinctive.  The greater yellowlegs has a louder and clearer call, often uttered in a three- or four-note sequence, ‘kyew kyew kyew,' with a falling inflection to each syllable.  The lesser yellowlegs tends to call once or twice.  Both species of yellowlegs have a ‘yodeling' song in addition to the better known sharp alarm calls.  This song is given either from the ground or during display flights and has been variously interpreted as ‘toowhee, toowhee,' ‘tweda, tweda,' or ‘whee-oodle, whee-oodle.'  It is heard both on the breeding grounds and in migration. ... “Life history: ...Fall migration begins in late July and lasts through September.  Primary routes are midcontinental (mostly west of the Mississippi River) in spring and both midcontinental and along the Atlantic coast in fall.  Wintering yellowlegs are scattered along the coasts from South America through California and Oregon.  In South America, birds concentrate where shallow lagoons and brackish herbaceous marshes lie adjacent to the outer coast.  Flooded agricultural fields, especially rice fields, have also become important.  In mild years greater yellowlegs winter as far north as southern Vancouver Island. “Behavior and feeding: The exaggerated legs of the Tringa genus are best explained by the custom of feeding in the water, often wading out beyond the belly depths of less elevated relatives.  Among shorebirds, long bills usually accompany long legs for the same reason.  The greater yellowlegs is an accomplished fisher, at times preying almost exclusively on small estuarine fishes such as sticklebacks and sculpins.  Sometimes groups of feeding yellowlegs will form lines, wading abreast to corner fish in the shallows.  Both yellowlegs, particularly the lesser, also eat invertebrates.  Adults and larvae of aquatic insects such as water boatmen, diving beetles, dragonfly nymphs, and flies are important in the diet, as are sand fleas and intertidal amphipods.  Terrestrial invertebrates such as ants,grasshoppers, snails, spiders and worms are also taken.  In spite of the length of the yellowlegs bill, it is rarely used for probing in sand or mud.  The greater yellowlegs will swing its bill from side to side in the water; the lesser yellowlegs does not. “Both yellowlegs breed in the boreal forest and the transitions between forest and tundra in wet bogs and open muskegs. During migration, both species frequent brackish tidal sloughs and mudflats, as well as the edges of freshwater lakes and ponds.  Lesser yellowlegs occasionally swim, an unusual practice amongshorebirds.  The lesser yellowlegs seems somewhat more gregarious than the greater, although both are seen in loose flocks.” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Yellowlegs,” text by Richard Carstensen (undated), updated by David Tessler in 2007, online (as a PDF) at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/education/wns/yellowlegs.pdf. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/greater_yellowlegs; there was no entry for Lesser Yellowlegs (as of 9-9-22). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Greater_Yellowlegs/; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Lesser_Yellowlegs/. Hugh Jennings, “Bird of the Month: Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs,” Eastside Audubon, August 23, 2018, online at https://www.eastsideaudubon.org/corvid-crier/2019/8/26/greaterlesser-yellowlegs. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244; the Lesser Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040131&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19244. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin,” online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/.  This site and its accompanying mobile app allow identification of birds by photo or sound.Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here

united states america music relationships new york university california game canada world education college guide water state mexico fall zoom living land stand research society tech government foundation oregon north america environment fish md press normal natural web dark va rain baltimore alaska ocean birds animals atlantic snow cd behavior citizens agency south america cambridge stream mixed adults priority plants biology native environmental primary bay images yellow dynamic grade bio commonwealth index legs processes menu central america pond signature virginia tech arial merlin scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences lesser stokes natural resources virginia beach adaptations mississippi river compatibility colorful vancouver island populations msonormal ls field guides times new roman distinguishing sections aquatic watershed zoology organisms flooded chesapeake chesapeake bay minn taxonomy policymakers new standard acknowledgment terrestrial ornithology cambria math style definitions worddocument xeno virginia department stormwater wintering johns hopkins university press saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr msonormaltable latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin wrapindent rmargin defjc intlim narylim inaturalist defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp name title cripple creek name strong name emphasis name normal name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference birdsongs ebird living systems grades k biotic wildlife resources alaska department shorebirds name e cumberland gap plumage light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table killdeer inland fisheries name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention virginia society michigan museum all about birds audio notes lang elliott water center tmdl lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 635 (8-29-22): A Fishing Focus for Labor Day, Featuring the Northern Neck Chantey Singers

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:14).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-26-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 29 and September 5, 2022.  This episode is a revised repeat of an episode from September 2012. MUSIC – ~15 sec – Lyrics: “Won't you help me to raise ‘em boys; hey, hey, honey.” In this episode, we honor Labor Day by featuring a musical tradition that helped hard-working African American watermen harvest Menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds. VOICE AND MUSIC - ~92 sec – Introduction: “Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.  I want to thank you for that wonderful introduction.  We are the Northern Neck Chantey Singers, and we are extremely happy to be back here once again to perform for you.  We call ourselves the Northern Neck Chantey Singers because all of us come from the Northern Neck counties of the Northern Neck, which is that body that's on the eastern part of Virginia, bordered by the Potomac River in the north, the majestic Chesapeake Bay in the east, and the Rappahannock River in the south.  The first song that we're gonna perform for you is sort of like our theme song.  It's called “Help us to raise ‘em, boys,” and it goes by showing how we pull in the nets that's teeming with fish.” Song Lyrics: “Won't you help me to raise ‘em boys?  Hey, hey, honey. C'mon now, let's go get ‘em; get ‘em now!Won't you help me to raise ‘em boys?  Hey, hey, honey.  C'mon boys let's go get ‘em, all right!Won't you help me to raise ‘em out?  See you when the sun goes down.” You've been listening to the Northern Neck Chantey Singers, performing at the 2011 Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Festival in Charlottesville.  In 1991, several former Virginia watermen formed the Northern Neck Chantey Singers to keep alive and spread awareness of the tradition of menhaden chanteys.  Menhaden chanteys are an example of African American work songs, used in this case to coordinate crews of watermen in the grueling labor of hauling up nets full of fish.  Atlantic menhaden are relatively small, oily fish that feed on microscopic plants and animals and in turn are prey for larger fish, such as Striped Bass and Bluefish.  Menhaden have been harvested from Atlantic Coast waters since the 1800s for a variety of industrial uses of their oils, and in southern states.  African Americans typically made up the crews doing the hard work of pulling up nets containing thousands of fish.  The chanteys, sung in a call-and-response style, helped the watermen coordinate the extra efforts needed for hauling in heavily loaded nets.  Today, hydraulic equipment does the net-hauling work formerly performed by watermen; the Northern Neck town of Reedville, in Northumberland County, is home to the Chesapeake Bay's only remaining industrial Menhaden operation, run by the Omega Protein company; and Bay Menhaden harvest quotas are at times a controversial issue.  Performances by the Northern Neck Chantey Singers remind us that those modern-day menhaden circumstances have a long, challenging, and culturally rich history of Virginians working on the water. Thanks to Virginia Humanities, formerly the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, for permission to use the excerpt of the Northern Neck Chantey Singers' performance, and we let those singers have the last word. MUSIC – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “Won't you help me to raise ‘em out?  See you when the sun goes down.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaced Episode 128, 9-17-12. Audio of the Northern Neck Chantey Singers was from a video of their September 11, 2011, performance at the Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Showcase in Charlottesville, used with permission of Virginia Humanities (formerly the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities), located in Charlottesville and online at https://virginiahumanities.org/.  The full performance video is available online at https://www.virginiafolklife.org/sights-sounds/northern-neck-chantey-singers-and-lewis-r-blackwell-jr/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus).  Drawing from he Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, “Atlantic Menhaden,” online at http://www.asmfc.org/species/atlantic-menhaden. Atlantic menhaden landings for bait and in the reduction industry (using the fish oils for various products) from 1940 to 2020.  Graph from the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, “Atlantic Menhaden,” online at http://www.asmfc.org/species/atlantic-menhaden. SOURCES Used for Audio Harold Anderson, “Menhaden Chanteys: An African American Legacy,” and “A History of Menhaden Fishing,” both in Maryland Marine Notes, Jan.-Feb. 2000, from the Maryland Sea Grant Program, available online at https://www.mdsg.umd.edu/maryland-marine-notes-archive. Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, “Atlantic Menhaden,” online at http://www.asmfc.org/species/atlantic-menhaden. Steve Bittenbender, “Omega Protein completes move of headquarters to Virginia,” Seafood Source, March 2, 2020. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Menhaden” (undated), online at http://www.chesapeakebay.net/issues/issue/menhaden#inline. The Mariners' Museum and Park (formerly The Mariners' Museum; Newport News, Va.), “Watermen Harvesting the Bounty: Menhaden Fishing” (2002), online at http://www.marinersmuseum.org/sites/micro/cbhf/waterman/wat011.html. Omega Protein Corporation, “Who We Are,” online at https://omegaprotein.com/who-we-are/. Virginia Humanities (formerly the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities), “Virginia Folklife Program: Northern Neck Chantey Singers and Lewis R. Blackwell, Jr.,” 2011, online at https://www.virginiafolklife.org/sights-sounds/northern-neck-chantey-singers-and-lewis-r-blackwell-jr/. For More Information about Menhaden or Menhaden Chanteys North Carolina Arts Council, “Menhaden Chanteymen/Beaufort, N.C.,” online at https://www.ncarts.org/menhaden-chanteymen. State Library of North Carolina et al., “NCPedia/Menhaden Chanteymen,” online at https://www.ncpedia.org/menhaden-chanteymen. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Species Information,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information.  The Altantic menhaden entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=010043&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19233. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, “Atlantic Menhaden,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/departments/fisheries/programs/mrg_oldwebsite/species_data/atlantic_menhaden/index.php. Virginia Marine Resources Commission/Menhaden Management Advisory Committee, online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/MMAC/mmac.shtm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the following subject categories: “Fish”; “History”; “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water.” Following are links to some other episodes on the Chesapeake Bay. Bay condition reports – Episode 305, 2-29-16; Episode 632, 7-18-22.Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 115, 6-18-12.Bay TMDL, Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 475, 6-3-19.Chesapeake Bay Commission – Episode 496, 10-28-19.Estuaries introduction – Episode 326, 7-25-16.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 1) – Episode 279, 8-24-15.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 2) – Episode 280, 9-7-15.“Smart” buoys – Episode 538, 8-17-20.Submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”) – Episode 325, 7-18-16.Winter birds of the Chesapeake Bay area – EP565 – 2/22/21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.7 – The ocean environment. Grades K-5: Earth Resources 1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited. 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent. LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex.  ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. Biology BIO.7 – Populations change through time. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Economics Theme 2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources. 3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Virginia Studies Course VS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history. VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present Course USII.6 – Social, economic, and technological changes from the 1890s to 1945. Civics and Economics Course CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography

music relationships university game history earth education social college water state change zoom living land research tech government performance north carolina public african americans smart environment park fish normal natural web dark va impact humans rain ocean animals atlantic museum snow types drawing citizens agency stream labor day fishing priority biology environmental bay images dynamic rivers grade bio resource won index charlottesville processes humanities menu pond streams signature virginia tech arial mariners accent singers atlantic ocean life sciences natural resources govt compatibility graphs colorful populations msonormal ls times new roman sections aquatic oysters civics watershed organisms chesapeake wg chesapeake bay taxonomy policymakers who we are virginians earth sciences shenandoah acknowledgment bluefish marine science submerged cosgrove newport news song lyrics cambria math style definitions worddocument stormwater virginia department saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent state library potomac river punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves sols trackformatting lidthemeother x none msonormaltable lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf atlantic coast mathfont brkbin brkbinsub lmargin smallfrac dispdef rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp united states history name title name normal name strong name emphasis name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent striped bass living systems grades k space systems wildlife resources name e cumberland gap estuaries name list light accent dark accent colorful accent name date name plain text name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful inland fisheries name mention virginia institute name hashtag rappahannock river name unresolved mention northern neck virginia foundation north carolina arts council ben cosgrove northumberland county virginia humanities audio notes water center tmdl virginia standards
Off Stage and On The Air

  Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsAustin Theatre PodcastsMake Every MediaHyde Park Theatre HPT Audio PlaysWhat We Talked About Merrily CastPoliticsThe Door Apologizes Audiences not coming back Take me out coming back Osnes Sues Titanique Saving the Devil Wears Prada Kite Runner mask policy Strippers Unionizing… Equity? Raisin in the Sun The Grobes – Sweeny ToddLocal The Vortex Naked at My Age Alchemy Theatre The Virgin Trial

politics zoom performance dance local theater musical normal broadway dark sun saving opera priority stuart signature audiences accent compatibility colorful msonormal times new roman devil wears prada human condition raisin calibri koop moulton cambria math shiro style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit showtunes trackmoves right click trackformatting lidthemeother x none mathpr msonormaltable lidthemeasian snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup latentstylecount subsup undovr donotpromoteqf mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority allowpng lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal name title name normal name strong name emphasis name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision step right up msohyperlink name e name list light accent dark accent colorful accent name date name plain text name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name message header name table columns name list table msonospacing relyonvml name mention name hashtag what we talked about my age name unresolved mention scheps name smart link dean johanesen
Off Stage and On The Air

 Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsCity Theatre The FantasticksWhat We Talked AboutShaggy/Sting Anne Heche A little Night Music (Barrington) Summer Stages threaten by climate change 13 on Netflix Nonbinary Joan of Arc My Onliness Joy The Musical Time Travelers Wife August Wilson House Midnight Theatre ACT Theatre's Board Steps DownThank you to Dean Johanesen, lead singer of "The Human Condition" who gave us permission to use "Step Right Up" as our theme song, so please visit their website.. they're good! (that's an order)