Podcasts about incidentally

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EXP. Share: Pokemon Playthrough Podcast
Mount Lanakila, Pokémon League, The “Elite” Four, Credits (#154)

EXP. Share: Pokemon Playthrough Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 49:14


Skull Lord has crushed the Alolan Region under his boot at last and Parrothead has kept the good vibes and good GOOD Pinap berry juice flowing from sea to shred-worthy sea. There's just one last obstacle to overcome for the disjointed duo. No, like, literally– they had to climb a mountain this week. And honestly? They both felt pretty ishy about it since it was apparently SACRED GROUND to the Tapus. (By the way, Tapu-hunting season is OPEN!) When we finally overcame every challenge and crested every summit, our hard work was rewarded with the shabbiest Elite Four we've ever gone up against. After dodging some thrown keys and cold approaches, we battled. Let's just say it went VERY well for the guy writing this description. (Incidentally, Tanner has been called an inspiration and is considered a mentor and role model to many successful people.)

Black Oni Podcast
Black Oni Podcast 104 | CASTCEPTION

Black Oni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 115:32


Join me in welcoming Andrew "Uriyya" Alliance back to the Black Oni Podcast! Incidentally, as the Black Oni Podcast returns, Andrew blesses our community with insight, and a behind the scenes look into his newly released book "Podcasting: What You Should Know." Looking to learn more about starting your own show? Buy now at https://andrewalliance.substack.com/p... Links to Black Oni | https://blackoni.com Support me by buying from Amazon | https://amzn.to/3M4cyTD Also, check out Andrew's youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/@UCrKfw-OqP6z... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackonipodcast/support

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast
64. The Secret to Growing Past a Prep Plateau

The Dominate Test Prep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 42:51


It's common to hit a plateau as you're preparing for your standardized test. Your momentum stalls, your practice test scores stop going up, and no matter how much you keep studying, you don't seem to be making any progress. The key to getting un-stuck so that you can get off your prep plateau and continue growing toward your goals lies in the "Growth Formula" as laid out by Brad Stulberg and Steve Magness in Peak Performance. In this episode we dissect their formula and reveal what may just be the secret ingredient for you to achieve the breakthrough you're looking for. Incidentally, the components of the Growth Formula will help you achieve excellence in all areas of your life to which you apply them. Even if you haven't [yet] hit a plateau as you're studying for your exam, the concepts and studies discussed here will help you optimize your preparation so that you can experience peak performance on test day.RESOURCES / LINKSPeak Performance, by Brad Stulberg and Steve MagnessComprehensive prep courses for the GMAT, GRE, Executive Assessment, and LSATSIMILAR EPISODESIf you enjoyed this episode, we encourage you to check out these other similar episodes of The Dominate Test Prep Podcast:Episode 17: Nutrition Hacks for Improved Focus, Memory, and Mental Clarity, with Dr. Barrett DeubertEpisode 33: How to Get Started Again if Something Derails Your PrepEpisode 40: Proven Principles of Perfect Practice, with Mike BerginA DOSE OF MOTIVATION“The process of setting a goal on the outer boundaries of what we think is possible, and then systematically pursuing it, is one of the most fulfilling parts about being human.” — Brad StulbergConnect with Us Get more free content on the DTP YouTube Channel Register for a comprehensive prep course (GMAT, GRE, EA, LSAT) Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts Questions? Comments? Email us at support@dominatetestprep.com.

low light mixes
Ambient Solar System

low light mixes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 59:56


    Fire up the Epstein Drive, get settled in your crash couch and set forth on a tour of the solar system. We'll travel from the sun past the inner planets and through asteroid belt out to the gas giants, into the kuiper belt and oort cloud, and finally reaching interstellar space. All the track titles make it clear where we are on this journey. Incidentally, there is a comet, C/2022 E3, that hopefully will be visible now through the first week of February. It should viewable first with a telescope then binoculars and maybe even with the naked eye around Feb. 1. This mix might make a good soundtrack for viewing. Link to most of the music used in this mix: https://deliaderbyshireappreciationsociety.bandcamp.com/album/wow-and-flutter https://www.amazon.com/music/player/albums/B087TDDQS1 https://www.amazon.com/music/player/albums/B0BSVCM1M7 https://whitelabrecs.bandcamp.com/album/home-diaries-014 https://haroldbudd.bandcamp.com/album/in-the-mist https://www.maxrichtermusic.com/albums/ad-astra/ https://www.amazon.com/music/player/albums/B01LVZ1PMQ?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://johantronestam.bandcamp.com/album/space-collection https://shop.christopherwillits.com/album/horizon https://virtual1.bandcamp.com/album/deep-space-objects https://bilvermette.bandcamp.com/album/hunting-for-planet-9 https://phonsonic.bandcamp.com/album/three-squared https://kagerecordings.bandcamp.com/album/kage-vol-one-quiet-dreams https://echospacestudio.bandcamp.com/album/echoes-in-space   Enjoy fellow space cadets. Cheers!   T R A C K L I S T : 00:00    Delia Derbyshire Appreciation Society - She Brought the Sun (Wow and Flutter 2018) 08:34    Underworld & John Murphy - Mercury (Sunshine OST 2008) 10:25    Casino Versus Japan - Names on Maps of Venus pt. 6 (Casino Versus Japan 1998) 11:50    Polaroid Notes - The Good Earth (Home Diaries 014 2020) 14:58    Harold Budd - Mars and the Artist (In The Mist 2011) 16:40    Brian Eno - Asteroid Dawn (Curiosities Volume II 2004) 20:42    Erstlaub - Jupiter (Deconstructed Music 1 2004) 24:50    Max Richter - The Rings of Saturn (Ad Astra OST 2019) 27:35    NASA Voyager Recordings - Rings of Uranus (Symphonies of the Planets 2009) 29:30    Johan Tronestam - Neptune (Space Collection 2017) 37:25    Christopher Willits - Comet (Horizon 2017) 41:50    Ishq - Pluto Shift (Deep Space Objects 2012) 47:10    Bil Vermette - Kuiper Belt (Hunting for Planet 9 2021) 52:35    Konstruct - Oort Cloud (Three (squared) 2021) 55:12    Factory - Interstellar (Kage, Vol. One: Quiet Dreams 2016) 57:50    Echospace - Where Are We Now (echospace [detroit] presents echoes in space 2014) 60:00    end

The Working With... Podcast
A Few Of My Favourite Productive Habits.

The Working With... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 13:34


This week's question is about all those little secrets I've discovered over the years that make getting work done on time, every time, easy.  You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin Email Mastery Course The Time Blocking Course The Working With… Weekly Newsletter The Time And Life Mastery Course The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl's YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page   Episode 259 | Script Hello, and welcome to episode 260 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein, and I am your host for this show. Over the years, I've picked up a few tips and tricks that have adopted have helped me to fine-tune my system and greatly improve my overall effectiveness and productivity. This week's question asked me directly about some of my lesser-known secrets. It was an interesting question because many of the things I do each day I've absorbed into my system and never really think about it anymore. It's a little like learning to drive a car. At first, you have to consciously remember to put the key in the ignition, or to put your foot on the brake and press the start button; after a while, those steps are done unconsciously. And BOOM! I've just given you the first tip, and I haven't even revealed the question.  The secret to mastering productivity or anything else is repetition. However, before I explain that a little more, let me hand you over to the Mystery Podcast Voice for this week's question. This week's question comes from Craig. Craig asks, Hi Carl, I've followed you for a while now, and I have always wondered, beyond what you share through your YouTube and blog if there are any other little nuggets you use every day that you haven't revealed in some form or another? Hi Craig, good question. I've never thought of that before. I'm sure there are things I do do every day that I do unconsciously that help my overall productivity. You set me quite a challenge here.  Well, let me return to what I was saying in the introduction. “The mother of mastery is repetition”. The more you do something, the better and faster you will get at it.  Take, for example, the humble weekly planning session. When you first do one, it will take you a long time. There are a lot of things you need to go through for the first time, and you will have to consciously think about what you are looking at and will likely read through everything.  Over time though, you learn what needs looking at and what can be skipped. If you come from a GTD background, you will feel you must go through all your open projects. And again, if you are a GTDer, pretty much everything you want to do will be a project—the anything involving two or more steps being a project idea.  That means you are going to have to go through hundreds of projects each and every week. Good luck with that one, my friends.  Now a more pragmatic way of doing your weekly planning session is to look through only your active projects. And here, you really only need to ask yourself what needs to happen next and when do I need to do it.  This dramatically reduces the amount of time you need for a weekly planning session, and as you get consistent with it, i.e. you do one every week, you know exactly what needs looking at. It just becomes natural. You know where to start, and that triggers everything else.  Incidentally linked to your weekly planning session is timing. When should you do yours? Now, over the years, I've tried all sorts of different times. I discovered the worst time to do your weekly planning is Sunday night. Yes, I know many of will be shouting at whatever device you are listening to this on. But bear with me.  Doing your weekly planning on a Sunday night is akin to leaving your exercise until the evening. You are going to be inconsistent. Your willpower is at its lowest in the evening, and worse, you will have pretty much forgotten a lot of what happened in the week just gone by.  The best time for a weekly planning session is first thing Saturday morning. Hear me out. Firstly, you're doing it in the morning and therefore, your willpower is at its highest. It's also a time where you likely do not have wake up early for work and you can wake up refreshed.  Next, no matter what you are doing on a Saturday morning, there's no excuses. If you need to set off early for an adventure day, you can wake up thirty or forty minutes earlier and get it done. AND… The icing on the cake… getting your weekly planning done first thing Saturday morning, leaves you worry free for the rest of weekend knowing that you've got the week ahead planned and you can now relax and enjoy the weekend.  Next tip. Turn everything you do repeatedly into a process. What I mean here is whether you are replying to your actionable emails, preparing for a meeting, or doing follow-up calls, create a process for doing it.  For example, when I clear my actionable emails, I make a cup of tea, turn on BBC Radio 2 and listen to Ken Bruce on the BBCs Sounds App—well I do at the moment, sadly we learned this week that Ken Bruce will be leaving at the end of March and I don't know what I will be listening to from April. But that's something I can deal with another day.  The tea, the music and the time of day (5pm to 6pm) sets an atmosphere and I open up my Action This Day folder and start at the top and work my way down (my email's in reverse order—oldest at the top). I resist the temptation to cherry pick. I just start at the top and work my way down.  Sometimes, the top two or three are quick replies, sometimes they are longer replies. Either way, I start there and work my way down the list.  I would say five or six days a week I clear them all, and on the day or two I don't, no worries, the ones I did not get to will be the first ones I deal with tomorrow.  It's a process that begins in the morning when I clear my inbox. There's usually 80 to 120 emails in my inbox in a morning (I live on the other side of the world, so most of my mail comes in through the night) So, I clear that first—I need to know about cancelled appointments and any “fires” before I start my day, and then email is pushed to the side until later in the day when I clear the actionable mail.  If you want to learn more about my process, I have a couple YouTube videos on it, and if you want to go much deeper, you can always enrol in my Email Mastery course. (Details as usual in the show notes)  Speaking of email and other forms of communication, here's another tip I follow. Set rules for how and when you will respond to the various inputs. And I can assure you this works whether you are the CEO or the newest recruit if, and you need to courage to do this, you spell out your rules to everyone.  My rules are: Emails will be responded to within 24 hours. Instant messages within two hours and phone calls immediately.  I remember those laughable days when companies tried to apply rules such as phone calls will be answered within five rings. These kind of rules are ridiculous because they are unsustainable. It left staff on edge because every time the phone rang they started counting. Terrible if you were trying to do some focused work.  I've come across some companies that still think this is a good idea. Respond to customer or client emails and messages immediately. Not only is this impossible, but it's terrible for your customers and staff. You set unrealistic expectations for both.  Set your own rules and communicate these to everyone. People don't care whether you respond immediately or not, what they want is consistency so once you set your rules. Be consistent. I can assure you, once you have these in place, you are much less jumpy when you get a message or an email. You know you have time to finish what you are doing before having the need to look at it. (That's also hard to do, but again, with practice it does get easier)  One of the most powerful productivity habits I have is never going to bed without knowing what two things I must do tomorrow. This is so ingrained in me now that I cannot sleep until I know.  Most days, I will do this leisurely in front of Todoist before I close the lid on my computer. Other days, when I am a bit rushed, or not in my office, I'll do it from my phone. Just open up Todoist, look at my tasks assigned for tomorrow and flag the two I must do tomorrow.  The beauty of this is I know once my morning routines are complete what I need to do and instead of not looking around for what to do, I get straight onto it. And that saves me a huge amount of time cumulatively through the week.  Ideally, I like to sit down and do this in front of my computer with my calendar open. It's a ten minute daily ritual, if you like, that saves me hours each week. I think this is why I cannot understand why so few people do it and why I preach so much about it. As I was thinking about this question, the biggest thing I do is to create processes for doing my core work—the work that is essential each week. That's this podcast, my YouTube videos, blog post and newsletters as well as writing client feedback and of course doing my coaching calls. I know exactly how much time I need for these activities each week and that time is blocked out in my calendar.  It's a non-negotiable part of my work life. Each part has a process, and from time to time, I look at my processes to see where I can improve them.  One final tip, whenever Todoist or Evernote update their apps, I always have a play with the new features. I want to know if the new features will enhance my processes or not. The only way to learn that is to play. Likewise, when Apple do their OS updates, I will watch the event, again to see where I can improve my processes.  I also resist the temptation to look at new apps. Todoist and Evernote have served me very well for the last ten years or so. I know them, they are familiar and they have never let me down.  And that's about it, Craig. I think I've covered quite a few tricks I use that I may not have covered here or in my YouTube videos. I hope they can be useful to you.  Thanks, Craig, for your question. And thank you to you, too, for listening.  It just remains for me now to wish you all a very, very productive week.   

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 20, 2023 is: vulpine • VUL-pine • adjective Vulpine is a formal word that means “of, relating to, or similar to a fox.” It is also used figuratively to mean “shrewd or crafty.” // The makeup artist did an incredible job creating realistic vulpine features to complement my fox costume. See the entry > Examples: “I was reading in peace when a shocking noise came through the window: the sound of a person shrieking in distress. ... A spurt of hasty Googling revealed that I was hearing ‘vixen screeches'—the mating calls of local red foxes. ... Breeding season in Massachusetts, where I'm currently located, is approaching its conclusion. Silence will soon return. But a part of me will miss the adrenaline spikes caused by these haunting vulpine screams.” — Molly Young, The New York Times, 26 Feb. 2022 Did you know? In Walden (1854), Henry David Thoreau described foxes crying out as they hunted through the winter forest, and he wrote, “Sometimes one came near to my window, attracted by my light, barked a vulpine curse at me, and then retreated.” Thoreau's was far from the first use of vulpine to describe our sly friends; English writers have been applying that adjective to the foxlike as well as the shrewd and crafty since at least the 15th century, and the Latin parent of our term, vulpinus (from the Latin word vulpes, meaning “fox”), was around long before that. Incidentally, the scientific name of the red fox, one of two possible North American fox species to have cussed out Thoreau, is Vulpes vulpes.

Ecommerce Brain Trust
The Convergence of Google SEO & Amazon - with Scott Walldren - Episode 273

Ecommerce Brain Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 19:41


In today's podcast, we are speaking once again with Scott Walldren, the Director of SEO for Acadia. Make sure you tune in to find out more! Scott Walldren is the Director of SEO for Acadia since October 2022. Previously, he spent 8 years developing and eventually heading up the SEO practice at 360i for Dentsu international. In addition to SEO, Scott has managed millions in paid search spend for national brands at Digitas and Razorfish and as a consultant inside and outside of startups. He lives in the far north Atlanta suburbs (close to Lake Lanier) with his wife, 3 kids, and 3 cats. Incidentally, he has some hands-on experience (albeit about 10 years old) setting up a store, product feeds and running ads on Amazon when he was at Case-Mate.

13 O'Clock Podcast
Movie Time LIVE: The Godfather Part III (1990)

13 O'Clock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023


Tom and Jenny discuss the third installment in Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather trilogy. Incidentally, the version we watched was the remaster, which was retitled to The Godfather Coda: The Death of Michael Corleone, which is what Coppola and Mario Puzo wanted to call it in the first place. Audio version: Video version: Please support us on … Continue reading Movie Time LIVE: The Godfather Part III (1990)

The Origins Podcast with Lawrence Krauss
Elizabeth Kolbert: Can human technology solve unintended consequences of human technology

The Origins Podcast with Lawrence Krauss

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 138:34


Note: Due to internet difficulties due to storms in California delaying uploading of the video, the video post of this podcast will be delayed by a few hours. We are thus releasing the audio version now. (Usually these are released at the same time.) Seven years ago I invited Elizabeth Kolbert to participate in a dialogue about Extinctions at the Orpheum Theater in Phoenix, following the publication of her Pulitzer Prizewinning masterpiece, The Sixth Extinction. Once we began The Origins Podcast, I knew that I wanted to have an in depth discussion with her about her work reporting on science issues, most importantly on climate change and other technological challenges facing modern society. An opportunity arose with the publication of her most recent book, Under a White Sky, which focuses on how scientists, and politicians, have attempted—with with widely varying degrees of success—to address the unintended consequences of various human alterations of terrestrial ecosystems. It is a fascinating book, told, as is typical in her writing, by relating personal experiences as Elizabeth has traveled the world to meet scientists and others spearheading attempts at solving sometimes urgent ecological crises induced as a result of the application of previous human technologies. Elizabeth writes so clearly about science that I wanted to explore her own journey, from a student focusing on German literature, to one of the pre-eminent science writers in the country, working as a staff writer for The New Yorker Magazine. We had a wide ranging discussion about her own experiences and then moved on to discuss more broadly the issues raised in her most recent books. Incidentally, the title of her new book comes from the fact that one of the side-effects of solar geoengineering, which I expect will be an inevitable response to climate change in a world where governments and businesses prefer to carry on business as usual in spite of concerns about rising temperatures, sea levels, and other potentially dangerous consequences of increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. The effect in question, if aerosols are injected in the upper atmosphere to reduce the intensity of solar radiation impinging on the earth's surface, will be to cause formerly bright blue skies to instead resemble the whiter skies those who live in big cities are used to. A potentially unfortunate consequence, but perhaps less unfortunate than other potential consequences of global climate change. The conversation was fantastic. Everything I had hoped for. We went on for over 2 hours, but the time passed quickly because it was so fascinating. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. And by the way, if you enjoy this podcast, Elizabeth will be joining the Origins Project Foundation Galapagos Travel Adventure in January of 2024. Reservations will open up at the beginning of April for this exciting trip, with Elizabeth, Frans de Waal, me, and 33 other Origins voyagers. I hope you can join us.As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe

The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War
The Battle of Santa Cruz with special guest Jon Parshall

The Unauthorized History of the Pacific War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 107:52


This week Bill and I have a special guest with us, he's been here before and we always love to have him, he's the one, the only, my good buddy, Jon Parshall.If you've been listening to the podcast as of late, you are well aware that we are making our way through the slug fest that was the Guadalcanal campaign.  While the fighting ashore has raged on and off between pitched engagements, the seas around the Canal have been anything but quiet.  Savo Island in August was a debacle for the US Navy, the carrier forces under Admiral fletcher landed some fairly significant blows on the Japanese carrier force at Eastern Solomons, and Admiral Norman Scott finally exacted some revenge for Savo at the Battle of Cape Esperance.  The US Navy has seen it's share of victories, as well as defeats in these bloody waters.  And while the fighting has been significant at sea…it ain't over.  Not even close.  The calendar now sits in October 1942, October 26 exactly.  And ashore, the Japanese have launched a massive offensive to finally push the Marines and Army off Guadalcanal.  The October offensive and the fighting that takes place ashore will be remembered as the Battle of Henderson Field.  The fighting at sea that takes place only a day later, all coinciding with the offensive ashore, will be called the Battle of Santa Cruz.Talking Points:Japanese Preparations and Plans Pre-Battle:The combined fleet sorties from Truk on October 11.  The force is very large, the largest Japanese force that has put to sea since Midway and consists of 4 CVs and 1 light CV3 Fleet CVs1 Light CV4 BBs8 CAs2 CLs24 DDsThe Japanese had planned that the naval force that was now at sea would not necessarily support the operation ashore, but would directly benefit from the success of the ground offensiveThat being said, once Hyakutake's infantry had captured Henderson, the Japanese combined fleet would then be free from any attack from land based air.The pre-sailing plans called for the Japanese so-called Support Force to make a high-speed run into the Guadalcanal area to intercept and destroy any American fleet units that would come to the rescue of the infantry following the Japanese land-based offensive's success.This is part of the reason why Kongo and Haruna blasted the shit out of Henderson on October 14-15.  Both to soften the defenses, destroy the airfield and also, hopefully draw the Americans out to fight.Japanese intel, which we have not talked about very much, had deduced via traffic patterns that at least 1 US CV was in the Canal area.Based on traffic patterns, the Japanese had seen a large flurry of messages go out to a “powerful unit” south of Guadalcanal that would receive the messages and maintain radio silence.This of course is CV8Again, based on traffic patterns, the Japanese had deduced that another major fleet unit had sailed from Pearl Harbor on or about Oct 15.This is the newly repaired CV6The Japanese estimated that this task force was headed south as well to join up with the other “ghost” forceJapanese. Intel also read US newspapers and listened to the news, as US officials ignorantly declared on October 20 that US Naval forces off Guadalcanal were preparing for a “sea clash”The Land influences the SeaDelays ashore from the Japanese 17th Army (future Henderson Field offensive force) caused Y-Day to be pushed from October 19 to the 22nd.  Incidentally, Hiyo suffers a fire in her engineering spaces that causes her to return to port and not take part in the planned upcoming action.17th Army again delays the offensive until the 24th further irritating the IJN.The delay by the Army forced the Navy to delay its attack which allowed CV6 to rejoin the American forces off Guadalcanal on October 24 and thus restoring some parity to any upcoming carrier battle.US Forces for battleUS forces are under the overall command of ADM Thomas Kinkaid TF 16 under Kinkaid has:CV61 CA1 CL 8 DDs 1 BB (SoDak)TF 17 under ADM George Murray has:CV82 CAs2 CLs 6 DDs Previous to CV6 returning from Pearl, CV8 was the only US CV in the area.CV8 was still, despite having been at Midway, an unexperienced CV.That being said, her aircrew was a mix of veterans and newbies.VS-8 skipper Gus Widhelm Veteran of Coral Sea and hit and run raids with VS-5Fantastic leaderVB-8 SBD pilot Clayton FisherVeteran of the Flight to Nowhere, June 4 afternoon raid and Mogami/Mikuma raid on June 6, but otherwise relatively fresh CV6 had just returned to the fleet after having been patched up after Eastern SolomonsCV6 still retained her well-trained deck crews, DC parties and the like.  Battle tested, CV6 would need all the help she could get in the upcoming fightWhile a veteran carrier, she deployed a brand-new air group, AG 10.Air Group 10, although new, is rife with veterans of different engagementsVF-10, better known as the Grim Reapers, is led by the legendary Jimmy Flatley and hosts names like:Jack LepplaDon Flash GordonWhitey Feightner and most importantly, Swede VejtasaBucky Lee led VS-10, not so much a veteran, but an incredible leader.  He had with him names that were both familiar and would become familiarBirney StrongMartin “Red” CarmodyAgain, technically a new air group, Air Group 10 would prove to be, arguably, the finest Air Group put to sea in 1942, and maybe the warThe Battle draws nearNight of October 24-25 the Japanese send out searches to find the suspected US CVs but do not find them.  They do detect ADM Willis Lee's BB56 but do not attack due to extreme rangeAround noon on October 25 US PBYs spot 2 Japanese CVsMonitoring the radio intercepts in Noumea, Halsey reads the sightings and messages Kinkaid “STRIKE! REPEAT STRIKE!”Amplifying reports allowed Kinkaid to launch at 1430 and again at 1520 his main strikeThe Japanese turned north, but radio silence does not allow Kinkaid to recall his strikers. This ends up, not so well, in that the majority of the strike gets lost and is, thankfully, shepherded back to CV6 by Swede Vejtasa who recalls that CV6 has an oil leak, spots the leak and follows it, at wave-top height, back to CV6 with the majority of the strike…at night.The Carrier Battle (Morning)Both sides readied search planes for a first light search patternDuring the night of 25-26, US PBYs spotted, and attacked, the Japanese including Zuikaku.  The PBYs missed, and their contact reports essentially went unheard.The Japanese got scouts off first, between 0415 and 0445.CV6 launched her own scouts around 0445 as well.  Kinkaid finally received the PBYs sighting report at 0512 but deemed the information old (which it was) and considered it to be inaccurate.One of CV6s scouts saw and approached one of Nagumo's Kate scout planes, only 85 miles away from CV6, confirming the presence of Japanese CVs in the area. First BloodBucky Lee, skipper of VS-10 spotted Nagumo's CVs at 0650 and climbed to attack altitude, but were driven off by CAPLee's scouting report alerted every SBD in the area, and drove them towards the Japanese like flies to honeyRadioman Clarence Garlow heard Lee's report, jotted it down and reported the contact to his pilot, Birney Strong.Birney and Eastern Solomons, pressure from Crommelin to attack and a bruise on his prideStrong diligently plotted the contact report, adjusted his fuel mixture for maximum distance and headed in the direction of the sighting.Showing off his supreme navigational skills, Strong found the enemy 20 minutes later as 2 of the 3 CVs in the area emerged from cloud cover.At the same time that Strong and his wingman Irvine approached, 2 other SBDs, one piloted by Red Carmody were being harassed by CAP Zeros, leaving Strong and Irvine wide open for a clear attack.Diving from 14,000 feet, at 0740, Strong popped in and out of clouds for the 30 seconds he dove.  At 1,500 feet the clouds parted and directly beneath him was the flight deck of Zuiho.Both Strong and Irvine planted their 500 pounders into the flight deck of Zuiho. The hits were not fatal, but did force her withdrawal.At 0658, Japanese scouts spot the HornetDespite the fact that the US spotted the Japanese first, it is the IJN that gets their strike off first (no surprise here)At 0725 Shokaku and Zuikaku launches their strikes, 62 aircraft led by MurataTalk about MurataComposition of the strikeAs the Japanese strike is on its way to Hornet, CV8 and a small CV6 strike passes them in the air.Let's talk about how the US strikes during this entire battle are very piecemeal, unorganized and generally unpreparedAs the Hornet strikers pass the Japanese, Zeros from Zuiho break off and attack the CV6 formationThe TBFs are hit hard as their fighter protection was in the process of making S turns to keep up with the slow TBFs and were on the outward leg of the turn during the attackAt 0850 Hornet's strike spotted Shokaku.  As the SBDs home in, they are hit again by Zuiho CAP, as well as Shokaku CAPGus Widhelm, strike leader, is shot down but later rescued.At the tail end of the formation is Clay FisherTalk about Clay's experienceHornet's strike, despite taking heavy casualties, is successful in hitting ShokakuJohn describe Shokaku damage 4-06 hits from 1000 poundersHornet Under AttackHornet receives word of the inbound strike from her outbound strikePoor coordination from CV6 and CV8 FDOs do not allow the CAP to engage in sufficient numbers to deter the incoming attack (Like Eastern Solomons)Japanese sight Hornet at 0855, but do not see CV6 as she dives into a rain squallHornet prepares for the attack, turns NE and dials up 31 knotsCAP engages at 15 miles but Vals break through and commence the attack at 0910First two Vals miss At 0912 Hornet is hit by three bombs within minutes1st bomb hits the flight deck and kills 60 men as it explodes 3 decks downMoments later another bomb struck the flight deck, this time exploding on the deck itself. The explosion blew an 11-foot hole in the deck, and the flying shrapnel killed another 30 of Hornet's crew. Still the rain of bombs came. Hornet suffered yet another hit when another 550-pound bomb penetrated three decks below and exploded there, causing severe damage but no loss of life. Seconds later, a damaged “Val” dive-bomber, hit by Hornet's own antiaircraft fire, plunged into the carrier's stack, glancing off of the port leading edge of the stack and smacking into the flight deck, the engine and propeller embedded firmly into the sea-blue stained Douglas fir flight deck. All of the hits suffered by Hornet thus far had occurred in a blinding fast span of just over two minutes. As Hornet reels from the Val attack, the Kates come into viewDescribe the Kate attack led by MurataHammer and anvil attack0915 Hornet is struck by 2 torpedoes starboard1 Val, having already dropped its load, swerves around Hornet from astern, passes the bridge and makes a wingtip vertical turn to crash into her port bowAt 0925 the attack is over and Hornet is dead in the water and listingFires were under control by 10, and she is being prepared for a two by NorthamptonThe Big E under attackJapanese Vals spot CV6 at 1000. They commence their attack at about 1015, led by SekiLT Keiichi Arima, who had hit the Big E at Eastern Solomons, again dives on CV6 and scores yet another hit on the ship.  Dead center near the bow.  The bomb flew through the flight deck and exploded in the water, showering CV6 with shrapnel and starting fires in the focsleMinutes later another bomb hits CV6, near the after portion of the forward elevator exploding in the hangar deck killing 40 menWilliam PinckneyAfrican American of slight build- carried wounded up the ladders to safety before he himself passed out, both wounded and with 3rd degree burns.  Navy CrossA third bomb was a tooth rattling near miss that opened hull plates and 2 empty fuel bunkersBy 1020, the attack was over.At 1035 the Kates arrived.  One of the CAP pilots to engage was Swede VejtasaDuring the attack on Hornet, Swede engaged and shot down one of the Vals that was about to dive on CV8, as well as one of the Vals that attacked CV6.Still aloft and with the majority of his ammunition still available, Swede switched off his two outboard weapons so as to conserve ammo, climbed above the Kate's altitude, dove into them and began picking them off one by one, dropping five of the bandits in about 15 seconds.His last target, another Kate, was riddled by Swede's guns, but flew on.  The aircraft piloted by Takei Kiyomi, dropped down, flew over SoDak and deliberately crashed into USS Smith.  The dead aircraft slid off the ship but the torpedo cooked off, setting the destroyer ablaze.Smith, under the command of LCDR Hunter Wood, steered directly into the boiling wake of SoDak.  The enormous wake thrown up by the battleship sliding along at 27 knots extinguished the flames, allowing the plucky little DD to resume station and resume firing.Vejtasa is credited with downing 7 Japanese aircraft in that one CAP mission, a record that still stands today. He would be recommended for the MOH, but instead would receive his 3rd (!) Navy CrossCV6 dodges a total of 9 Japanese torpedoes, throughout her ordeal USS South Dakota (BB-57) keeps station, a scant 1,000 yards astern, matching every move she makes so as to provide AAA support with her new 40mm bofors guns.SoDak claims 26 kills, an unlikely mark, but nevertheless, her guns and her adroit maneuvering certainly helped keep the Big E afloat.The returning Japanese (what few manage to return) get back to their CVs and speak of the tremendous amounts of American AA.  Some of those who returned were visibly shaken and could not speak due to shock.The Battle OverAt 1135 with CV8 out of action and CV6 heavily damaged, Kinkaid withdraws, leaving CV8 under tow by Northampton and a few screeners.At 1235 CV6 resumes landing ops and recovers the remaining aircraft aloft with only one operable elevator.  LSO Robin Lindsey, performs his legendary “virtuoso” He receives word from the bridge to stop landing aircraft as the deck is clogged.  Knowing that the majority of the remaining aircraft are SBDs, he elects to literally pull the plug from his headset, ignore orders and bring the boys down.  Lindsey landed so many planes that he was landing the last batch on the last arresting wire, unfazed. Last to land was Swede catching the #1 wire, with 56 other aircraft jammed ahead of him on the deck.At 1520, with the majority of US forces leaving the field of battle, Hornet is attacked again.  She is struck by 1 torpedo from Junyo. At this point, the remaining crew abandons ship and she is ordered to be scuttled.2 US DDs fire over 400 rounds into CV8 as well as torpedoes, but she refuses to sink.  (Harder than woodpecker lips)Knowing the IJN is closing, the DDs beat feet and get the hell out of the area, leaving CV8 to her enemy. 2 Japanese DDs finally finish Hornet off.Implications on the CampaignClearly Santa Cruz is a US defeat, although we claimed victory.  We leave the field of battle to the enemy and suffer more damage…clear defeat…in one way, a victory in another although unseen at that time.Japanese air losses have now reached a critical level.  Through attrition at Coral Sea, Midway, eastern Solomons, and especially Santa Cruz, more than half of the elite aviators who started the war are now dead.  Japanese pilot training and replacement systems problemsFinal Tally:US- 1 CV sunk, 1 DD sunk, 1 CV heavily damaged.  1 BB lightly damaged, 1 CL and 2 DDs damaged.81 aircraft lost266 men KIAJapanese- 1 CV heavily damaged, 1light CV damaged, 1 CA damaged, 1 DD damaged99 aircraft lost400-500 men KIA18% of Zero pilots killed 50% of Val crews killed31% of Kate crews killedHorrendous aircrew lossesUS AA, with the introduction of the 40mm account for roughly half of these losses!

Kicking the Seat
Ep841: THE BAD GUYS (2022) - Mini-review and Blu-ray GIVEAWAY!

Kicking the Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023


Ian finally caught up with one of 2022's best animated films, The Bad Guys!But he's the first to admit that he's not the target audience for Pierre Perifel's adaptation of the long-running kids' books series by Aaron Blabey.So he's enlisted an expert to help him describe the mind-bending zaniness of this heist movie/redemption tale, which centers on a gang of villains' quest to turn good (then bad, then...maybe good again?).Plus! Stay tuned to the very end (a whopping seven minutes into the video) to learn how YOU can win a brand new Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Combo Pack of The Bad Guys! The contest ends at 5pm CST on Thursday, January 12, 2023. Winner will be notified via Twitter DM, with a request to provide their mailing address. Incidentally, this giveaway is not sponsored by (or in any way affiliated with) Dreamworks Animation Studios or Universal Pictures.Show Links:Watch The Bad Guys trailer.Attention gamers! This episode's special guest is related to another up-and-coming YouTuber named Lunatic Bagel, who is currently making a series of Stardew Valley play-throughs and tutorials. Check it out, and feel free to like, subscribe, and comment!Subscribe to, like, and comment on the Kicking the Seat YouTube channel!

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan
Ep. 82: Hindus, the diaspora and the Rishi Sunak phenomenon

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 9:51


This essay was published by the indianaffairs.com at https://theindianaffairs.com/en/hindus-the-diaspora-and-the-rishi-sunak-phenomenon/Now that the euphoria over the ascent of Rishi Sunak to the position of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom has died down a little, it is worthwhile to consider the implications. On the one hand, there is understandable pride that someone in the diaspora has done well: I remember how delighted all of us were when V S Naipaul got his Nobel Prize in literature. On the other hand, what is the tangible value to India of Sunak's rapid rise to the leadership of what is, let us be honest, a racist, white-supremacist, imperial nation that is staring at the edge of an economic precipice? I was personally relieved a month or so ago when Sunak lost the leadership race to Liz Truss, simply because the rot is so bad in Britain that not even superhuman efforts are going to save the country from ruin.My argument was that Sunak had dodged a bullet: whoever ended up as PM would inherit such an impossible mess, such a tar baby, that they would forever be blamed for it, even if they were innocent bystanders. So why not let someone else, like Liz Truss, fall on the sword? If it were Sunak, not only would he be blamed individually, but also, in priority order a) Hindus, b) Indians, c) brown people, d) Stanford MBAs. It was best all around, I said at the time, to let some white woman be the fall guy, as it were. And we saw exactly what happened to her in 44 days: humiliated, disgraced, kicked out of office, her political career probably ruined forever. The sad thing is that nothing has changed now. After Brexit, the UK is merely a small “tribal”, “bad-toothed”, “flavour-starved” “sub-Scandinavian archipelago” as a hilarious critic on Twitter, @gathara, calls it. His/her “breaking news” about the West is a cheeky microscope turned back on the US, the UK etc by a Kenyan using the same demeaning language Western media uses for the rest of the world. Janan Ganesh, a columnist at the FT, had a good insight: Britain is laboring under the illusion that it is the US, which can wield its currency as a weapon; failing which, it has its military with which to quell challengers. Britain has none of the above. It has also been living beyond its means. Now it is forced to sell its family silver just to survive. As an example, there was a recent accusation that British Air Force pilots were sent to train Chinese pilots; which would likely mean American military secrets were dished out as they went ‘open-kimono'.There is a fair chance that Sunak, too, will go down the same way Truss did, and indeed Boris Johnson did: resigning in disgrace. But in any case, everybody will find their expectations of him will be unfulfilled. Indians naively believe Sunak will be nice to India. On the contrary, his job is to look out for Britain's interests. And he has many constraints on him.For example, Sunak has brought back Suella Braverman, who had been sacked as Home Minister. She  irritated Indians by being an arch-imperialist saying there were too many Indians overstaying their visas in the UK. Surely, he did to ensure domestic support and avoid schisms in his own party. And yes, Braverman is of Indian origin, too. Remember that Rishi Sunak is a Briton and not an Indian, even though he is a practicing and devout Hindu. His personal faith cannot get in the way of his doing his job as PM. In fact, he may even have to be particularly harsh on India to fend off allegations of dual loyalties. I remember Indian managers in Silicon Valley doing the same thing: they were especially hard on their Indian employees just to appear ‘neutral': over-compensation. I am by no means saying that there's nothing to celebrate in Sunak's rise. I am also delighted when Indian-origin people do well in other countries, against the odds. Maybe it is an irrational bout of ethnic pride. And it is true that Indians, especially Hindus, are now becoming more visible in their countries of residence, through hard work and the efforts of ‘Tiger Mothers'. I was reminded of this the other day when searching through my usual podcasts: I came across two Indian-Americans, although based on their accents they are both immigrants. One is the Pulitzer-winning oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee speaking of his new book The Song of the Cell; the other is Nick Santhanam, a Silicon Valley investor and former McKinsey consultant, talking about his new book The Titanium Economy. Then there's the articulate Balaji Srinivasan, a visionary and crypto-evangelist who foresees the rise of distributed ‘network states'. And Saagar Enjeti, who runs an interesting podcast channel.In a sense, Indians are following in the footsteps of Jews: they, too, leveraged their smarts, especially in medicine, finance and cinema, to rise to the top of the heap in the US. Indians are, interestingly, using medicine, finance and technology in their rise to wealth. Incidentally, the only other ethnic-minority PM ever in the UK was Benjamin Disraeli, a Jew. I used to think there would be a natural alliance between Jews and Hindus, especially as both have been under relentless attack by the same Abrahamic groups. India was the only country to never to oppress Jewish residents, too. But now I am not so sure. Maybe it's because Jews are, after all, Abrahamics themselves. And maybe they find themselves in competition with Hindus.I am reminded of various Jews who are not exactly pro Hindu: Wendy Doniger, Sheldon Pollock, Amy Wax (a law professor), Amy Kazmin (former FT bureau chief in India). Kazmin, whom I befriended on Twitter, once gave me the generic equivalent of “But my best friend is a Jew” when I complained about her unsympathetic stance towards Hindus: “But I check my articles with a Hindu Kayastha”. The irony was apparently lost on her. Similarly, Hindus are singularly unfortunate to not have allies, even though we are the last pagans standing. Some Buddhists are strongly anti-Hindu, as in the case of the Rev Zenji Nio, a Japanese. And we know about the Sikh diaspora and its Khalistan obsession. Yes, divide and rule has worked all too well. Be that as it may, personally, I am irrationally happy when fellow-paisanos do well. I celebrated when Sundar Pichai and Satya Nadella rose in tech; I was a big fan of the late C K Prahalad. But let us be very clear: while they will do what they can for the mother country, the diaspora are not Indians, and their success is not tied to India. To them, India is increasingly remote, a distant memory. Their reality is America, or wherever they have chosen to make their home. They have no skin in India's game. India will rise mostly based on the efforts of those who live in the country. Rishi Sunak, ironically, has a stake in India because he's married to Infosys Narayana Murthy's daughter Akshata, and she owns about 1% of the company. Sunak is independently wealthy, though, having made his fortune on Wall Street and private equity. But that's about it: we can all be proud of Rishi Sunak, whose Hindu values have enabled him to prosper in a hostile white world, and he is unapologetic about his religion. But his rise to the top of the Anglosphere is not particularly a win for India. India will have to rise based on its own efforts, not because of any favors from anybody. Permanent interests, not permanent friends.1270 words, 6 Nov 2022 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit rajeevsrinivasan.substack.com

The Convivial Society
Year End Miscellany and "What You Get Is the World" (Audio Version)

The Convivial Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 14:29


Welcome back to the Convivial Society. In this installment, you'll find the audio version of the latest essay, “What You Get Is the World.” I try to record an audio version of most installments, but I send them out separately from the text version for reasons I won't bore you with here. Incidentally, you can also subscribe to the newsletter's podcast feed on Apple Podcasts and Spotify. Just look up The Convivial Society. Aside from the audio essay, you'll find an assortment of year-end miscellany below. I trust you are all well as we enter a new year. All the best to you and yours! A Few Notable PostsHere are six installments from this past year that seemed to garner a bit of interest. Especially if you've just signed up in recent weeks, you might appreciate some of these earlier posts. Incidentally, if you have appreciated the writing and would like to become a paid supporter at a discounted rate, here's the last call for this offer. To be clear, the model here is that all the writing is public but I welcome the patronage of those who are able and willing. Cheers!Podcast AppearancesI've not done the best job of keeping you all in loop on these, but I did show up in a few podcasts this year. Here are some of those: With Sean Illing on attentionWith Charlie Warzel on how being online traps us in the pastWith Georgie Powell on reframing our experience Year's EndIt is something of a tradition at the end of the year for me to share Richard Wilbur's poem, “Year's End.” So, once again I'll leave you with it.Now winter downs the dying of the year,   And night is all a settlement of snow;From the soft street the rooms of houses show   A gathered light, a shapen atmosphere,   Like frozen-over lakes whose ice is thin   And still allows some stirring down within.I've known the wind by water banks to shakeThe late leaves down, which frozen where they fell   And held in ice as dancers in a spell   Fluttered all winter long into a lake;   Graved on the dark in gestures of descent,   They seemed their own most perfect monument.There was perfection in the death of ferns   Which laid their fragile cheeks against the stone   A million years. Great mammoths overthrown   Composedly have made their long sojourns,   Like palaces of patience, in the grayAnd changeless lands of ice. And at PompeiiThe little dog lay curled and did not rise   But slept the deeper as the ashes roseAnd found the people incomplete, and froze   The random hands, the loose unready eyes   Of men expecting yet another sunTo do the shapely thing they had not done.These sudden ends of time must give us pause.   We fray into the future, rarely wroughtSave in the tapestries of afterthought.More time, more time. Barrages of applause   Come muffled from a buried radio.The New-year bells are wrangling with the snow.Thank you all for reading along in 2022. We survived, and I'm looking forward to another year of the Convivial Society in 2023. Cheers, Michael Get full access to The Convivial Society at theconvivialsociety.substack.com/subscribe

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
2022 Cigar of the Year Countdown (Coop's List): #10: Mi Querida Triqui Traca No. 448 by Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 6:44


Coming in at #10 is the Mi Querida Triqui Traca No. 448 by Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. The story of the Mi Querida Triqui Traca can be traced back to a cigar known as the Mi Querida Firecracker. This is a project that Steve Sakadid for New Hampshire-based retailer Two Guys Smoke Shop in 2018. The Mi Querida Firecracker was a 3 1/2 x 50 size featuring a long fuse much like a Firecracker. For that project, Saka released the Mi Querida Firecracker using an alternative blend that was stronger than the Mi Querida that was out at the time, the Mi Querida Blue. With Mi Querida Trique Traca (which is a name that refers to a large firecracker almost resembling a stick of dynamite), Saka worked with that alternate blend and tweaked it to be released in other sizes (minus the long fuse). One of those sizes that were added was a 4 x 48 vitola that was released in 2021. Like the original Mi Querida Blue, the Triqui Traca makes use of a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. The remainder of the blend consists Nicaraguan binder and a combination of Nicaraguan and Dominican fillers. There are two notable differentiators with the Triqui Tracker when compared to the  Blue. First, the wrapper of Triqui Traca was switched from the traditional Connecticut Broadleaf Mediums to the rarer No. 1 Dark corona leaves. Second, the filler incorporates what is described as a “high octane ligero” from the Dominican Republic. Production comes from the NACSA factory. The 4 x 48 size is one that has brought Saka success on the Cigar Coop Countdown in the past. In 2018, the Mi Querida Gordita in the Blue Blend finished as #7 Cigar of the Year. Incidentally, this isn't the first time Triqui Traca has landed on the Countdown. In 2020, the 552 size finished at #16. The Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 delivered a mix of mixed pepper, cocoa, blackberry, and earth. The cigar came in at medium to full strength and medium to full body. As I stated when I assessed this cigar, this small little size was loaded with flavor and it delivers plenty of boldness. The Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 lands Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust on a Cigar Coop Countdown for an eighth consecutive year. If you have been keeping score at home Nicaragua has been dominating the 2022 Countdown. Of the 21 cigars unveiled thus far, the Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 is the 15th to come out of Nicaragua. Full Report: https://wp.me/p6h1n1-ooR  

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
2022 Cigar of the Year Countdown (Coop's List): #10: Mi Querida Triqui Traca No. 448 by Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust (Audio)

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 6:44


Coming in at #10 is the Mi Querida Triqui Traca No. 448 by Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. The story of the Mi Querida Triqui Traca can be traced back to a cigar known as the Mi Querida Firecracker. This is a project that Steve Sakadid for New Hampshire-based retailer Two Guys Smoke Shop in 2018. The Mi Querida Firecracker was a 3 1/2 x 50 size featuring a long fuse much like a Firecracker. For that project, Saka released the Mi Querida Firecracker using an alternative blend that was stronger than the Mi Querida that was out at the time, the Mi Querida Blue. With Mi Querida Trique Traca (which is a name that refers to a large firecracker almost resembling a stick of dynamite), Saka worked with that alternate blend and tweaked it to be released in other sizes (minus the long fuse). One of those sizes that were added was a 4 x 48 vitola that was released in 2021. Like the original Mi Querida Blue, the Triqui Traca makes use of a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. The remainder of the blend consists Nicaraguan binder and a combination of Nicaraguan and Dominican fillers. There are two notable differentiators with the Triqui Tracker when compared to the  Blue. First, the wrapper of Triqui Traca was switched from the traditional Connecticut Broadleaf Mediums to the rarer No. 1 Dark corona leaves. Second, the filler incorporates what is described as a “high octane ligero” from the Dominican Republic. Production comes from the NACSA factory. The 4 x 48 size is one that has brought Saka success on the Cigar Coop Countdown in the past. In 2018, the Mi Querida Gordita in the Blue Blend finished as #7 Cigar of the Year. Incidentally, this isn't the first time Triqui Traca has landed on the Countdown. In 2020, the 552 size finished at #16. The Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 delivered a mix of mixed pepper, cocoa, blackberry, and earth. The cigar came in at medium to full strength and medium to full body. As I stated when I assessed this cigar, this small little size was loaded with flavor and it delivers plenty of boldness. The Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 lands Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust on a Cigar Coop Countdown for an eighth consecutive year. If you have been keeping score at home Nicaragua has been dominating the 2022 Countdown. Of the 21 cigars unveiled thus far, the Mi Querida Triqui Traca 448 is the 15th to come out of Nicaragua. Full Report: https://wp.me/p6h1n1-ooR  

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
XMAS BONUS: “Christmas Time is Here Again” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022


As we're in the period between Christmas and New Year, the gap between episodes is going to be longer than normal, and the podcast proper is going to be back on January the ninth. So nobody has to wait around for another fortnight for a new episode, I thought I'd upload some old Patreon bonus episodes to fill the gap. Every year around Christmas the bonus episodes I do tend to be on Christmas songs and so this week I'm uploading three of those. These are older episodes, so don't have the same production values as more recent episodes, and are also shorter than more recent bonuses, but I hope they're still worth listening to. Hello, and welcome to this week's second Patreon bonus episode. I'm recording this on December the twenty-third, so whether you hear this before Christmas is largely down to how quickly we can get the main episode edited and uploaded. Hopefully, this is going up on Christmas Eve and you're all feeling appropriately festive. Normally for the Patreon bonuses in the last week of December I choose a particularly Christmassy record from the time period we're covering in the main podcast -- usually a perennial Christmas hit like something off the Phil Spector Christmas album or the Elvis Christmas album. However, this year we're in the mid sixties, a period when none of the big hits of US or UK Christmas music were released, because it's after the peak of US Christmas music and before the peak of UK Christmas music. There were Christmas albums by people like James Brown, but they weren't major parts of the discography. So today, we're going to have a brief run-through of the Beatles' Christmas records. These were flexi-discs -- which for those of you who are too young to remember them were records pressed on very, very, thin, cheap plastic, which used to be attached to things like kids' comics or cereal boxes as promotional gimmicks -- sent out to members of the group's fan club. In a way, these were the Beatles' very own Patreon bonuses, sent out to fans and supporters, and not essential works, but hopefully interesting and fun. They very rarely had anything like a full song, being mostly made up of sketches and recorded messages, and other than a limited-edition vinyl reissue a few years back they've never been put on general release -- though one song from the discs, "Christmas Time is Here Again", *was* released as a B-side of the CD single of "Free as A Bird" in 1995: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Christmas Time is Here Again"] Other than that, the Christmas records remain one of those parts of the Beatles catalogue which have never seen a proper widespread release. The first record was made on October the 17th 1963, at the same recording session as "I Want to Hold Your Hand", at the instigation of Tony Barrow, the group's publicist, who also came up with a script for the group to depart from: [Excerpt, the Beatles' first Christmas record] Barrow apparently edited the recording himself, using scissors and tape, and much of that was just taking out the swearing. Incidentally, I've seen some American sources talking about the word "Crimble" being a word that the Beatles made up themselves, but it's actually a fairly standard bit of Scouse slang. The second Christmas record was recorded at the end of the sessions for Beatles For Sale and was much the same kind of thing, though this time they incorporated sound effects: [Excerpt: The Beatles' Second Christmas Record] That was never sent to American fans. Instead, they got a cardboard copy of an edited version of the first record (it's possible to make records out of cardboard, but they can only be played a handful of times). They wouldn't get another Christmas record until 1968, though British fans kept receiving them. The third record sees the group parodying other people's hits, including a brief rendition of "It's the Same Old Song" interrupted by George Harrison saying they can't sing it because of copyright, and an attempt to sing Barry McGuire's "Eve of Destruction" and "Auld Lang Syne" at the same time: [Excerpt: The Beatles' Third Christmas Record] The fourth record, from 1966, was recorded during the early sessions for "Strawberry Fields Forever", and titled "Pantomime: Everywhere It's Christmas". For those outside the UK and its sphere of cultural influence, pantomime is a British Xmas stage tradition which is very hard to explain if you've not experienced it, involving performances that are ostensibly of fairy stories like Cinderella or Snow White, but also usually involving drag performances -- the male lead is usually played by a young woman, while there's usually an old woman character played by a man in drag -- with audience participation, songs, and old jokes of the "I do declare, the Prince's balls get bigger every year!" type. As the title suggests, then, the 1966 Christmas record is an attempt at an actual narrative of sorts, though a surreal, incoherent one. It comes across very much like the Goon show -- though like one of the later episodes where Milligan has lost all sense of narrative coherence: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Pantomime: Everywhere It's Christmas"] it's probably the best of the group's Christmas efforts, and certainly the most fully realised to this point. The 1967 Christmas record, "Christmas Time is Here Again", is even more ambitious. It's another narrative, which sees the group playing a fictitious group called the Ravellers, auditioning for the BBC: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Christmas Time is Here Again"] It also features parodies of broadcasting formats, which I've seen a few people suggest were inspired by the Bonzo Dog Band's then-recent Craig Torso Show radio performances, but which seem to me more indicative just of a general shared sense of humour: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Christmas Time is Here Again"] But that record has become most famous for having one of the closest things on any of these records to a full song, the title track "Christmas Time is Here Again": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Christmas Time is Here Again"] As well as later being issued as the B-side of a CD single, that was also remade by Ringo as a solo record: [Excerpt: Ringo Starr, "Christmas Time is Here Again"] Although my favourite use of the song is actually as an interpolation, with slightly altered lyrics, in "Xmas Again" by Stew of the Negro Problem, one of my favourite current songwriters: [Excerpt: Stew, "Xmas Again"] "Christmas Time is Here Again" would be the last Christmas record the group would make together. For their final two Christmas releases, they recorded their parts separately and got their friend, the DJ Kenny Everett, who was known at this point for his tricks with tape editing, and who shared their sense of humour (he later went on to become a successful TV comedian) to collage them together into something listenable. The highlight of the 1968 record comes from George's contribution. George, a lover of the ukulele, got Tiny Tim to record his version of "Nowhere Man" for the record: [Excerpt: Tiny Tim, "Nowhere Man"] And for the seventh and final Christmas single, recorded after the group had split up but before the split was announced, Everett once again cobbled it together from separate recordings, this time a chat between John and Yoko, Ringo improvising a song and plugging his new film, and Paul singing an original Christmas song: [Excerpt: Paul McCartney, "Merry, Merry, Year"] George's contribution was a single sentence. In 1970, the fan club members got one final record -- an actual vinyl album, compiling all the previous Christmas records in one place. All the Beatles would in future record solo Christmas singles, some of which became perennial classics, but there would never be another Beatles Christmas record [Excerpt, the end of the third Beatles Christmas record]

The RETROZEST Podcast
128: A Very RETRO Hannukah & Christmas!

The RETROZEST Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 31:24


On Episode 128 of the RETROZEST podcast, Curtis closes out the year of 2022 with A Very Retro Hannukah & Christmas! Included are excerpts from some of the greatest bits of pop culture celebrating the primary winter holidays (including Saturday Night Live, Friends, Seinfeld and A Charlie Brown Christmas! Additionally, Mr. Retrovere shares this week's Retro News segment and Landmark Celebrity Birthdays for December 2022! Incidentally, you may help the RetroZest Podcast by purchasing a Celebrity Video Message gift for a friend/family member from CelebVM! Choose from celebrities like Barry Williams, Gary Busey, Ernie Hudson, Robert Fripp, Right Said Fred, etc.! Simply enter their website through our portal store.retrozest.com/celebvm, and shop as you normally would; it's no extra cost to you at all! Contact Curtis at podcast@retrozest.com, or via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Also, check us out on TikTok!

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass
Incidentally Christmas: And The Winner Is...

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 67:29


Merry Christmas, Shitters! It's time to declare a winner for this Incidentally Christmas series, so throw another yule log on the open fire and listen in! For updates on which movie we're watching next follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cbkapod Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass is part of the EaseDrop Podcast Network Also, if you don't mind leaving us a review on your podcast app, that would be sweet. Support Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/chew-bubblegum-and-kick-ass

Classic Audiobook Collection
Round the Sofa by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 962:35


Round the Sofa by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell audiobook. Round the Sofa (1859), is a book of stories by the lady that Charles Dickens called his “dear Scheherazade” due to her skill as a story teller. That Lady was Mrs. Elizabeth Gaskell (North and South, Wives and Daughters, Cranford etc.). Mrs. Gaskell begins with Round the Sofa, a short story which she uses as a device to stitch together six previously published stories into a single work. It introduces us to a set of characters who take turns to recount stories to one another during their weekly soirée. My Lady Ludlow tells the story of the widowed, aristocratic Lady Ludlow and her fierce resistance to change. It is told through the eyes of one of her young charges. Incidentally, it was one of the books used to create the TV series Cranford. An Accursed Race is actually an essay about a persecuted minority group, the Cagots in Western France. The Doom of the Griffiths. A Gothic short story about a cursed family and set in Wales. Half a Life-Time Ago. A novella set in the Wiltshire Dales. The Poor Clare. A Ghostly short story! The Half Brothers. A sad short story about brotherly love and a sheep-dog dog named Lassie!

POLITICO's Nerdcast
The anti-McCarthy faction teases a shadow speaker

POLITICO's Nerdcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 37:43


Rep. Bob Good (R-Va.) and his allies are trying to end Kevin McCarthy's reign as leader of the House Republicans. Good is one of five Republicans in the far-right Freedom Caucus vowing to block McCarthy's path to the 218 votes needed to become Speaker of the House. The two have a history. In 2020, Good was running for Congress to represent Virginia's 5th Congressional District. Incidentally, also home to the race between James Madison and James Monroe to be the district's first representative in Congress. Madison won. While Good was running for Congress, Kevin McCarthy tried to consolidate power in the Republican House conference on his way to becoming Speaker. During his campaign, Good knocked out one of McCarthy's loyal member's at the GOP nominating convention. At a private meeting recently, Good and McCarthy had a heated exchange about events at the time. On this episode of Playbook Deep Dive, Playbook co-author Rachael Bade went to the Hill to meet Good at his office and dig for details on the history of his relationship with McCarthy and whom Good and his allies intended to support for Speaker instead.

Audio Chimera
Resolution: Reduce!

Audio Chimera

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 7:45


People are always making New Year's Resolutions that add things to their lives and busy schedules and I once read an article that suggested we reduce what we do. So that's my resolution: which I am making on the eve of the arrival of  a new kitten. Follow my blog at musofyr.org for more on that! Incidentally this concludes Season 5 of Audio Chimera; I'll be back in 2023 with Season 6!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 160: “Flowers in the Rain” by the Move

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022


Episode 160 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Flowers in the Rain" by the Move, their transition into ELO, and the career of Roy Wood. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "The Chipmunk Song" by Canned Heat. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Note I say "And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record." -- I should point out that after Martin's theme fades, Blackburn talks over a brief snatch of a piece by Johnny Dankworth. Resources As so many of the episodes recently have had no Mixcloud due to the number of songs by one artist, I've decided to start splitting the mixes of the recordings excerpted in the podcasts into two parts. Here's part one . I had problems uploading part two, but will attempt to get that up shortly. There are not many books about Roy Wood, and I referred to both of the two that seem to exist -- this biography by John van der Kiste, and this album guide by James R Turner.  I also referred to this biography of Jeff Lynne by van der Kiste, The Electric Light Orchestra Story by Bev Bevan, and Mr Big by Don Arden with Mick Wall.  Most of the more comprehensive compilations of the Move's material are out of print, but this single-CD-plus-DVD anthology is the best compilation that's in print. This is the one collection of Wood's solo and Wizzard hits that seems currently in print, and for those who want to investigate further, this cheap box set has the last Move album, the first ELO album, the first Wizzard album, Wood's solo Boulders, and a later Wood solo album, for the price of a single CD. Transcript Before I start, a brief note. This episode deals with organised crime, and so contains some mild descriptions of violence, and also has some mention of mental illness and drug use, though not much of any of those things. And it's probably also important to warn people that towards the end there's some Christmas music, including excerpts of a song that is inescapable at this time of year in the UK, so those who work in retail environments and the like may want to listen to this later, at a point when they're not totally sick of hearing Christmas records. Most of the time, the identity of the party in government doesn't make that much of a difference to people's everyday lives.  At least in Britain, there tends to be a consensus ideology within the limits of which governments of both main parties tend to work. They will make a difference at the margins, and be more or less competent, and more or less conservative or left-wing, more or less liberal or authoritarian, but life will, broadly speaking, continue along much as before for most people. Some will be a little better or worse off, but in general steering the ship of state is a matter of a lot of tiny incremental changes, not of sudden u-turns. But there have been a handful of governments that have made big, noticeable, changes to the structure of society, reforms that for better or worse affect the lives of every person in the country. Since the end of the Second World War there have been two UK governments that made economic changes of this nature. The Labour government under Clement Atlee which came into power in 1945, and which dramatically expanded the welfare state, introduced the National Health Service, and nationalised huge swathes of major industries, created the post-war social democratic consensus which would be kept to with only minor changes by successive governments of both major parties for decades. The next government to make changes to the economy of such a radical nature was the Conservative government which came to power under Margaret Thatcher in 1979, which started the process of unravelling that social democratic consensus and replacing it with a far more hypercapitalist economic paradigm, which would last for the next several decades. It's entirely possible that the current Conservative government, in leaving the EU, has made a similarly huge change, but we won't know that until we have enough distance from the event to know what long-term changes it's caused. Those are economic changes. Arguably at least as impactful was the Labour government led by Harold Wilson that came to power in 1964, which did not do much to alter the economic consensus, but revolutionised the social order at least as much. Largely because of the influence of Roy Jenkins, the Home Secretary for much of that time, between 1964 and the end of the sixties, Britain abolished the death penalty for murder, decriminalised some sex acts between men in private, abolished corporal punishment in prisons, legalised abortion in certain circumstances, and got rid of censorship in the theatre. They also vastly increased spending on education, and made many other changes. By the end of their term, Britain had gone from being a country with laws reflecting a largely conservative, authoritarian, worldview to one whose laws were some of the most liberal in Europe, and society had started changing to match. There were exceptions, though, and that government did make some changes that were illiberal. They brought in increased restrictions on immigration, starting a worrying trend that continues to this day of governments getting ever crueler to immigrants, and they added LSD to the list of illegal drugs. And they brought in the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act, banning the pirate stations. We've mentioned pirate radio stations very briefly, but never properly explained them. In Britain, at this point, there was a legal monopoly on broadcasting. Only the BBC could run a radio station in the UK, and thanks to agreements with the Musicians' Union, the BBC could only play a very small amount of recorded music, with everything else having to be live performances or spoken word. And because it had a legal obligation to provide something for everyone, that meant the tiny amount of recorded music that was played on the radio had to cover all genres, meaning that even while Britain was going through the most important changes in its musical history, pop records were limited to an hour or two a week on British radio. Obviously, that wasn't going to last while there was money to be made, and the record companies in particular wanted to have somewhere to showcase their latest releases. At the start of the sixties, Radio Luxembourg had become popular, broadcasting from continental Europe but largely playing shows that had been pre-recorded in London. But of course, that was far enough away that it made listening to the transmissions difficult. But a solution presented itself: [Excerpt: The Fortunes, "Caroline"] Radio Caroline still continues to this day, largely as an Internet-based radio station, but in the mid-sixties it was something rather different. It was one of a handful of radio stations -- the pirate stations -- that broadcast from ships in international waters. The ships would stay three miles off the coast of Britain, close enough for their broadcasts to be clearly heard in much of the country, but outside Britain's territorial waters. They soon became hugely popular, with Radio Caroline and Radio London the two most popular, and introduced DJs like Tony Blackburn, Dave Lee Travis, Kenny Everett, and John Peel to the airwaves of Britain. The stations ran on bribery and advertising, and if you wanted a record to get into the charts one of the things you had to do was bribe one of the big pirate stations to playlist it, and with this corruption came violence, which came to a head when as we heard in the episode on “Here Comes the Night”, in 1966 Major Oliver Smedley, a failed right-wing politician and one of the directors of Radio Caroline, got a gang of people to board an abandoned sea fort from which a rival station was broadcasting and retrieve some equipment he claimed belonged to him. The next day, Reginald Calvert, the owner of the rival station, went to Smedley's home to confront him, and Smedley shot him dead, claiming self-defence. The jury in Smedley's subsequent trial took only a minute to find him not guilty and award him two hundred and fifty guineas to cover his costs. This was the last straw for the government, which was already concerned that the pirates' transmitters were interfering with emergency services transmissions, and that proper royalties weren't being paid for the music broadcast (though since much of the music was only on there because of payola, this seems a little bit of a moot point).  They introduced legislation which banned anyone in the UK from supplying the pirate ships with records or other supplies, or advertising on the stations. They couldn't do anything about the ships themselves, because they were outside British jurisdiction, but they could make sure that nobody could associate with them while remaining in the UK. The BBC was to regain its monopoly (though in later years some commercial radio stations were allowed to operate). But as well as the stick, they needed the carrot. The pirate stations *had* been filling a real need, and the biggest of them were getting millions of listeners every day. So the arrangements with the Musicians' Union and the record labels were changed, and certain BBC stations were now allowed to play a lot more recorded music per day. I haven't been able to find accurate figures anywhere -- a lot of these things were confidential agreements -- but it seems to have been that the so-called "needle time" rules were substantially relaxed, allowing the BBC to separate what had previously been the Light Programme -- a single radio station that played all kinds of popular music, much of it live performances -- into two radio stations that were each allowed to play as much as twelve hours of recorded music per day, which along with live performances and between-track commentary from DJs was enough to allow a full broadcast schedule. One of these stations, Radio 2, was aimed at older listeners, and to start with mostly had programmes of what we would now refer to as Muzak, mixed in with the pop music of an older generation -- crooners and performers like Englebert Humperdinck. But another, Radio 1, was aimed at a younger audience and explicitly modelled on the pirate stations, and featured many of the DJs who had made their names on those stations. And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record. At different times Blackburn has said either that he was just desperately reaching for whatever record came to hand or that he made a deliberate choice because the record he chose had such a striking opening that it would be the perfect way to start a new station: [Excerpt: Tony Blackburn first radio show into "Flowers in the Rain" by the Move] You may remember me talking in the episode on "Here Comes the Night" about how in 1964 Dick Rowe of Decca, the manager Larry Page, and the publicist and co-owner of Radio Caroline Phil Solomon were all trying to promote something called Brumbeat as the answer to Merseybeat – Brummies, for those who don't know, are people from Birmingham. Brumbeat never took off the way Merseybeat did, but several bands did get a chance to make records, among them Gerry Levene and the Avengers: [Excerpt: Gerry Levene and the Avengers, "Dr. Feelgood"] That was the only single the Avengers made, and the B-side wasn't even them playing, but a bunch of session musicians under the direction of Bert Berns, and the group split up soon afterwards, but several of the members would go on to have rather important careers. According to some sources, one of their early drummers was John Bohnam, who you can be pretty sure will be turning up later in the story, while the drummer on that track was Graeme Edge, who would later go on to co-found the Moody Blues.  But today it's the guitarist we'll be looking at. Roy Wood had started playing music when he was very young -- he'd had drum lessons when he was five years old, the only formal musical tuition he ever had, and he'd played harmonica around working men's clubs as a kid. And as a small child he'd loved classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky and Elgar. But it wasn't until he was twelve that he decided that he wanted to be a guitarist. He went to see the Shadows play live, and was inspired by the sound of Hank Marvin's guitar, which he later described as sounding "like it had been dipped in Dettol or something": [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Apache"] He started begging his parents for a guitar, and got one for his thirteenth birthday -- and by the time he was fourteen he was already in a band, the Falcons, whose members were otherwise eighteen to twenty years old, but who needed a lead guitarist who could play like Marvin. Wood had picked up the guitar almost preternaturally quickly, as he would later pick up every instrument he turned his hand to, and he'd also got the equipment. His friend Jeff Lynne later said "I first saw Roy playing in a church hall in Birmingham and I think his group was called the Falcons. And I could tell he was dead posh because he had a Fender Stratocaster and a Vox AC30 amplifier. The business at the time. I mean, if you've got those, that's it, you're made." It was in the Falcons that Wood had first started trying to write songs, at first instrumentals in the style of the Shadows, but then after the Beatles hit the charts he realised it was possible for band members to write their own material, and started hesitantly trying to write a few actual songs. Wood had moved on from the Falcons to Gerry Levene's band, one of the biggest local bands in Birmingham, when he was sixteen, which is also when he left formal education, dropping out from art school -- he's later said that he wasn't expelled as such, but that he and the school came to a mutual agreement that he wouldn't go back there. And when Gerry Levene and the Avengers fell apart after their one chance at success hadn't worked out, he moved on again to an even bigger band. Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders had had two singles out already, both produced by Cliff Richard's producer Norrie Paramor, and while they hadn't charted they were clearly going places. They needed a new guitarist, and Wood was by far the best of the dozen or so people who auditioned, even though Sheridan was very hesitant at first -- the Night Riders were playing cabaret, and all dressed smartly at all times, and this sixteen-year-old guitarist had turned up wearing clothes made by his sister and ludicrous pointy shoes. He was the odd man out, but he was so good that none of the other players could hold a candle to him, and he was in the Night Riders by the time of their third single, "What a Sweet Thing That Was": [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, "What a Sweet Thing That Was"] Sheridan later said "Roy was and still is, in my opinion, an unbelievable talent. As stubborn as a mule and a complete extrovert. Roy changed the group by getting us into harmonies and made us realize there was better material around with more than three chords to play. This was our turning point and we became a group's group and a bigger name." -- though there are few other people who would describe Wood as extroverted, most people describing him as painfully shy off-stage. "What a  Sweet Thing That Was" didn't have any success, and nor did its follow-up, "Here I Stand", which came out in January 1965. But by that point, Wood had got enough of a reputation that he was already starting to guest on records by other bands on the Birmingham scene, like "Pretty Things" by Danny King and the Mayfair Set: [Excerpt: Danny King and the Mayfair Set, "Pretty Things"] After their fourth single was a flop, Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders changed their name to Mike Sheridan's Lot, and the B-side of their first single under the new name was a Roy Wood song, the first time one of his songs was recorded. Unfortunately the song, modelled on "It's Not Unusual" by Tom Jones, didn't come off very well, and Sheridan blamed himself for what everyone was agreed was a lousy sounding record: [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan's Lot, "Make Them Understand"] Mike Sheridan's Lot put out one final single, but the writing was on the wall for the group. Wood left, and soon after so did Sheridan himself. The remaining members regrouped under the name The Idle Race, with Wood's friend Jeff Lynne as their new singer and guitarist. But Wood wouldn't remain without a band for long. He'd recently started hanging out with another band, Carl Wayne and the Vikings, who had also released a couple of singles, on Pye: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "What's the Matter Baby"] But like almost every band from Birmingham up to this point, the Vikings' records had done very little, and their drummer had quit, and been replaced by Bev Bevan, who had been in yet another band that had gone nowhere, Denny Laine and the Diplomats, who had released one single under the name of their lead singer Nicky James, featuring the Breakaways, the girl group who would later sing on "Hey Joe", on backing vocals: [Excerpt: Nicky James, "My Colour is Blue"] Bevan had joined Carl Wayne's group, and they'd recorded one track together, a cover version of "My Girl", which was only released in the US, and which sank without a trace: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "My Girl"] It was around this time that Wood started hanging around with the Vikings, and they would all complain about how if you were playing the Birmingham circuit you were stuck just playing cover versions, and couldn't do anything more interesting.  They were also becoming more acutely aware of how successful they *could* have been, because one of the Brumbeat bands had become really big. The Moody Blues, a supergroup of players from the best bands in Birmingham who featured Bev Bevan's old bandmate Denny Laine and Wood's old colleague Graeme Edge, had just hit number one with their version of "Go Now": [Excerpt: The Moody Blues, "Go Now"] So they knew the potential for success was there, but they were all feeling trapped. But then Ace Kefford, the bass player for the Vikings, went to see Davy Jones and the Lower Third playing a gig: [Excerpt: Davy Jones and the Lower Third, "You've Got a Habit of Leaving"] Also at the gig was Trevor Burton, the guitarist for Danny King and the Mayfair Set. The two of them got chatting to Davy Jones after the gig, and eventually the future David Bowie told them that the two of them should form their own band if they were feeling constricted in their current groups. They decided to do just that, and they persuaded Carl Wayne from Kefford's band to join them, and got in Wood.  Now they just needed a drummer. Their first choice was John Bonham, the former drummer for Gerry Levene and the Avengers who was now drumming in a band with Kefford's uncle and Nicky James from the Diplomats. But Bonham and Wayne didn't get on, and so Bonham decided to remain in the group he was in, and instead they turned to Bev Bevan, the Vikings' new drummer.  (Of the other two members of the Vikings, one went on to join Mike Sheridan's Lot in place of Wood, before leaving at the same time as Sheridan and being replaced by Lynne, while the other went on to join Mike Sheridan's New Lot, the group Sheridan formed after leaving his old group. The Birmingham beat group scene seems to have only had about as many people as there were bands, with everyone ending up a member of twenty different groups). The new group called themselves the Move, because they were all moving on from other groups, and it was a big move for all of them. Many people advised them not to get together, saying they were better off where they were, or taking on offers they'd got from more successful groups -- Carl Wayne had had an offer from a group called the Spectres, who would later become famous as Status Quo, while Wood had been tempted by Tony Rivers and the Castaways, a group who at the time were signed to Immediate Records, and who did Beach Boys soundalikes and covers: [Excerpt: Tony Rivers and the Castaways, "Girl Don't Tell Me"] Wood was a huge fan of the Beach Boys and would have fit in with Rivers, but decided he'd rather try something truly new. After their first gig, most of the people who had warned against the group changed their minds. Bevan's best friend, Bobby Davis, told Bevan that while he'd disliked all the other groups Bevan had played in, he liked this one. (Davis would later become a famous comedian, and have a top five single himself in the seventies, produced by Jeff Lynne and with Bevan on the drums, under his stage name Jasper Carrott): [Excerpt: Jasper Carrott, "Funky Moped"] Most of their early sets were cover versions, usually of soul and Motown songs, but reworked in the group's unique style. All five of the band could sing, four of them well enough to be lead vocalists in their own right (Bevan would add occasional harmonies or sing novelty numbers) and so they became known for their harmonies -- Wood talked at the time about how he wanted the band to have Beach Boys harmonies but over instruments that sounded like the Who. And while they were mostly doing cover versions live, Wood was busily writing songs. Their first recording session was for local radio, and at that session they did cover versions of songs by Brenda Lee, the Isley Brothers, the Orlons, the Marvelettes, and Betty Everett, but they also performed four songs written by Wood, with each member of the front line taking a lead vocal, like this one with Kefford singing: [Excerpt: The Move, "You're the One I Need"] The group were soon signed by Tony Secunda, the manager of the Moody Blues, who set about trying to get the group as much publicity as possible. While Carl Wayne, as the only member who didn't play an instrument, ended up the lead singer on most of the group's early records, Secunda started promoting Kefford, who was younger and more conventionally attractive than Wayne, and who had originally put the group together, as the face of the group, while Wood was doing most of the heavy lifting with the music. Wood quickly came to dislike performing live, and to wish he could take the same option as Brian Wilson and stay home and write songs and make records while the other four went out and performed, so Kefford and Wayne taking the spotlight from him didn't bother him at the time, but it set the group up for constant conflicts about who was actually the leader of the group. Wood was also uncomfortable with the image that Secunda set up for the group. Secunda decided that the group needed to be promoted as "bad boys", and so he got them to dress up as 1930s gangsters, and got them to do things like smash busts of Hitler, or the Rhodesian dictator Ian Smith, on stage. He got them to smash TVs on stage too, and in one publicity stunt he got them to smash up a car, while strippers took their clothes off nearby -- claiming that this was to show that people were more interested in violence than in sex. Wood, who was a very quiet, unassuming, introvert, didn't like this sort of thing, but went along with it. Secunda got the group a regular slot at the Marquee club, which lasted several months until, in one of Secunda's ideas for publicity, Carl Wayne let off smoke bombs on stage which set fire to the stage. The manager came up to try to stop the fire, and Wayne tossed the manager's wig into the flames, and the group were banned from the club (though the ban was later lifted). In another publicity stunt, at the time of the 1966 General Election, the group were photographed with "Vote Tory" posters, and issued an invitation to Edward Heath, the leader of the Conservative Party and a keen amateur musician, to join them on stage on keyboards. Sir Edward didn't respond to the invitation. All this publicity led to record company interest. Joe Boyd tried to sign the group to Elektra Records, but much as with The Pink Floyd around the same time, Jac Holzman wasn't interested. Instead they signed with a new production company set up by Denny Cordell, the producer of the Moody Blues' hits. The contract they signed was written on the back of a nude model, as yet another of Secunda's publicity schemes. The group's first single, "Night of Fear" was written by Wood and an early sign of his interest in incorporating classical music into rock: [Excerpt: The Move, "Night of Fear"] Secunda claimed in the publicity that that song was inspired by taking bad acid and having a bad trip, but in truth Wood was more inspired by brown ale than by brown acid -- he and Bev Bevan would never do any drugs other than alcohol. Wayne did take acid once, but didn't like it, though Burton and Kefford would become regular users of most drugs that were going. In truth, the song was not about anything more than being woken up in the middle of the night by an unexpected sound and then being unable to get back to sleep because you're scared of what might be out there. The track reached number two on the charts in the UK, being kept off the top by "I'm a Believer" by the Monkees, and was soon followed up by another song which again led to assumptions of drug use. "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" wasn't about grass the substance, but was inspired by a letter to Health and Efficiency, a magazine which claimed to be about the nudist lifestyle as an excuse for printing photos of naked people at a time before pornography laws were liberalised. The letter was from a reader saying that he listened to pop music on the radio because "where I live it's so quiet I can hear the grass grow!" Wood took that line and turned it into the group's next single, which reached number five: [Excerpt: The Move, "I Can Hear the Grass Grow"] Shortly after that, the group played two big gigs at Alexandra Palace. The first was the Fourteen-Hour Technicolor Dream, which we talked about in the Pink Floyd episode. There Wood had one of the biggest thrills of his life when he walked past John Lennon, who saluted him and then turned to a friend and said "He's brilliant!" -- in the seventies Lennon would talk about how Wood was one of his two favourite British songwriters, and would call the Move "the Hollies with balls". The other gig they played at Alexandra Palace was a "Free the Pirates" benefit show, sponsored by Radio Caroline, to protest the imposition of the Marine Broadcasting (Offences) Act.  Despite that, it was, of course, the group's next single that was the first one to be played on Radio One. And that single was also the one which kickstarted Roy Wood's musical ambitions.  The catalyst for this was Tony Visconti. Visconti was a twenty-three-year-old American who had been in the music business since he was sixteen, working the typical kind of jobs that working musicians do, like being for a time a member of a latter-day incarnation of the Crew-Cuts, the white vocal group who had had hits in the fifties with covers of "Sh'Boom" and “Earth Angel”. He'd also recorded two singles as a duo with his wife Siegrid, which had gone nowhere: [Excerpt: Tony and Siegrid, "Up Here"] Visconti had been working for the Richmond Organisation as a staff songwriter when he'd met the Move's producer Denny Cordell. Cordell was in the US to promote a new single he had released with a group called Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale", and Visconti became the first American to hear the record, which of course soon became a massive hit: [Excerpt: Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale"] While he was in New York, Cordell also wanted to record a backing track for one of his other hit acts, Georgie Fame. He told Visconti that he'd booked several of the best session players around, like the jazz trumpet legend Clark Terry, and thought it would be a fun session. Visconti asked to look at the charts for the song, out of professional interest, and Cordell was confused -- what charts? The musicians would just make up an arrangement, wouldn't they? Visconti asked what he was talking about, and Cordell talked about how you made records -- you just got the musicians to come into the studio, hung around while they smoked a few joints and worked out what they were going to play, and then got on with it. It wouldn't take more than about twelve hours to get a single recorded that way. Visconti was horrified, and explained that that might be how they did things in London, but if Cordell tried to make a record that way in New York, with an eight-piece group of session musicians who charged union scale, and would charge double scale for arranging work on top, then he'd bankrupt himself. Cordell went pale and said that the session was in an hour, what was he going to do? Luckily, Cordell had a copy of the demo with him, and Visconti, who unlike Cordell was a trained musician, quickly sat down and wrote an arrangement for him, sketching out parts for guitar, bass, drums, piano, sax, and trumpets. The resulting arrangement wasn't perfect -- Visconti had to write the whole thing in less than an hour with no piano to hand -- but it was good enough that Cordell's production assistant on the track, Harvey Brooks of the group Electric Flag, who also played bass on the track, could tweak it in the studio, and the track was recorded quickly, saving Cordell a fortune: [Excerpt: Georgie Fame, "Because I Love You"] One of the other reasons Cordell had been in the US was that he was looking for a production assistant to work with him in the UK to help translate his ideas into language the musicians could understand. According to Visconti he said that he was going to try asking Phil Spector to be his assistant, and Artie Butler if Spector said no.  Astonishingly, assuming he did ask them, neither Phil Spector nor Artie Butler (who was the arranger for records like "Leader of the Pack" and "I'm a Believer" among many, many, others, and who around this time was the one who suggested to Louis Armstrong that he should record "What a Wonderful World") wanted to fly over to the UK to work as Denny Cordell's assistant, and so Cordell turned back to Visconti and invited him to come over to the UK. The main reason Cordell needed an assistant was that he had too much work on his hands -- he was currently in the middle of recording albums for three major hit groups -- Procol Harum, The Move, and Manfred Mann -- and he physically couldn't be in multiple studios at once. Visconti's first work for him was on a Manfred Mann session, where they were recording the Randy Newman song "So Long Dad" for their next single. Cordell produced the rhythm track then left for a Procol Harum session, leaving Visconti to guide the group through the overdubs, including all the vocal parts and the lead instruments: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "So Long Dad"] The next Move single, "Flowers in the Rain", was the first one to benefit from Visconti's arrangement ideas. The band had recorded the track, and Cordell had been unhappy with both the song and performance, thinking it was very weak compared to their earlier singles -- not the first time that Cordell would have a difference of opinion with the band, who he thought of as a mediocre pop group, while they thought of themselves as a heavy rock band who were being neutered in the studio by their producer.  In particular, Cordell didn't like that the band fell slightly out of time in the middle eight of the track. He decided to scrap it, and get the band to record something else. Visconti, though, thought the track could be saved. He told Cordell that what they needed to do was to beat the Beatles, by using a combination of instruments they hadn't thought of. He scored for a quartet of wind instruments -- oboe, flute, clarinet, and French horn, in imitation of Mendelssohn: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] And then, to cover up the slight sloppiness on the middle eight, Visconti had the wind instruments on that section recorded at half speed, so when played back at normal speed they'd sound like pixies and distract from the rhythm section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] Visconti's instincts were right. The single went to number two, kept off the top spot by Englebert Humperdinck, who spent 1967 keeping pretty much every major British band off number one, and thanks in part to it being the first track played on Radio 1, but also because it was one of the biggest hits of 1967, it's been the single of the Move's that's had the most airplay over the years. Unfortunately, none of the band ever saw a penny in royalties from it. It was because of another of Tony Secunda's bright ideas. Harold Wilson, the Prime Minister at the time, was very close to his advisor Marcia Williams, who started out as his secretary, rose to be his main political advisor, and ended up being elevated to the peerage as Baroness Falkender. There were many, many rumours that Williams was corrupt -- rumours that were squashed by both Wilson and Williams frequently issuing libel writs against newspapers that mentioned them -- though it later turned out that at least some of these were the work of Britain's security services, who believed Wilson to be working for the KGB (and indeed Williams had first met Wilson at a dinner with Khrushchev, though Wilson was very much not a Communist) and were trying to destabilise his government as a result. Their personal closeness also led to persistent rumours that Wilson and Williams were having an affair. And Tony Secunda decided that the best way to promote "Flowers in the Rain" was to print a postcard with a cartoon of Wilson and Williams on it, and send it out. Including sticking a copy through the door of ten Downing St, the Prime Minister's official residence. This backfired *spectacularly*. Wilson sued the Move for libel, even though none of them had known of their manager's plans, and as a result of the settlement it became illegal for any publication to print the offending image (though it can easily be found on the Internet now of course), everyone involved with the record was placed under a permanent legal injunction to never discuss the details of the case, and every penny in performance or songwriting royalties the track earned would go to charities of Harold Wilson's choice. In the 1990s newspaper reports said that the group had up to that point lost out on two hundred thousand pounds in royalties as a result of Secunda's stunt, and given the track's status as a perennial favourite, it's likely they've missed out on a similar amount in the decades since. Incidentally, while every member of the band was banned from ever describing the postcard, I'm not, and since Wilson and Williams are now both dead it's unlikely they'll ever sue me. The postcard is a cartoon in the style of Aubrey Beardsley, and shows Wilson as a grotesque naked homunculus sat on a bed, with Williams naked save for a diaphonous nightgown through which can clearly be seen her breasts and genitals, wearing a Marie Antoinette style wig and eyemask and holding a fan coquettishly, while Wilson's wife peers at them through a gap in the curtains. The text reads "Disgusting Depraved Despicable, though Harold maybe is the only way to describe "Flowers in the Rain" The Move, released Aug 23" The stunt caused huge animosity between the group and Secunda, not only because of the money they lost but also because despite Secunda's attempts to associate them with the Conservative party the previous year, Ace Kefford was upset at an attack on the Labour leader -- his grandfather was a lifelong member of the Labour party and Kefford didn't like the idea of upsetting him. The record also had a knock-on effect on another band. Wood had given the song "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree" to his friends in The Idle Race, the band that had previously been Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, and they'd planned to use their version as their first single: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree"] But the Move had also used the song as the B-side for their own single, and "Flowers in the Rain" was so popular that the B-side also got a lot of airplay. The Idle Race didn't want to be thought of as a covers act, and so "Lemon Tree" was pulled at the last minute and replaced by "Impostors of Life's Magazine", by the group's guitarist Jeff Lynne: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Impostors of Life's Magazine"] Before the problems arose, the Move had been working on another single. The A-side, "Cherry Blossom Clinic", was a song about being in a psychiatric hospital, and again had an arrangement by Visconti, who this time conducted a twelve-piece string section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic"] The B-side, meanwhile, was a rocker about politics: [Excerpt: The Move, "Vote For Me"] Given the amount of controversy they'd caused, the idea of a song about mental illness backed with one about politics seemed a bad idea, and so "Cherry Blossom Clinic" was kept back as an album track while "Vote For Me" was left unreleased until future compilations. The first Wood knew about "Cherry Blossom Clinic" not being released was when after a gig in London someone -- different sources have it as Carl Wayne or Tony Secunda -- told him that they had a recording session the next morning for their next single and asked what song he planned on recording. When he said he didn't have one, he was sent up to his hotel room with a bottle of Scotch and told not to come down until he had a new song. He had one by 8:30 the next morning, and was so drunk and tired that he had to be held upright by his bandmates in the studio while singing his lead vocal on the track. The song was inspired by "Somethin' Else", a track by Eddie Cochran, one of Wood's idols: [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran, "Somethin' Else"] Wood took the bass riff from that and used it as the basis for what was the Move's most straight-ahead rock track to date. As 1967 was turning into 1968, almost universally every band was going back to basics, recording stripped down rock and roll tracks, and the Move were no exception. Early takes of "Fire Brigade" featured Matthew Fisher of Procol Harum on piano, but the final version featured just guitar, bass, drums and vocals, plus a few sound effects: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] While Carl Wayne had sung lead or co-lead on all the Move's previous singles, he was slowly being relegated into the background, and for this one Wood takes the lead vocal on everything except the brief bridge, which Wayne sings: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] The track went to number three, and while it's not as well-remembered as a couple of other Move singles, it was one of the most influential. Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols has often said that the riff for "God Save the Queen" is inspired by "Fire Brigade": [Excerpt: The Sex Pistols, "God Save the Queen"] The reversion to a heavier style of rock on "Fire Brigade" was largely inspired by the group's new friend Jimi Hendrix. The group had gone on a package tour with The Pink Floyd (who were at the bottom of the bill), Amen Corner, The Nice, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and had become good friends with Hendrix, often jamming with him backstage. Burton and Kefford had become so enamoured of Hendrix that they'd both permed their hair in imitation of his Afro, though Burton regretted it -- his hair started falling out in huge chunks as a result of the perm, and it took him a full two years to grow it out and back into a more natural style. Burton had started sharing a flat with Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and Burton and Wood had also sung backing vocals with Graham Nash of the Hollies on Hendrix's "You Got Me Floatin'", from his Axis: Bold as Love album: [Excerpt: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, "You Got Me Floatin'"] In early 1968, the group's first album came out. In retrospect it's arguably their best, but at the time it felt a little dated -- it was a compilation of tracks recorded between late 1966 and late 1967, and by early 1968 that might as well have been the nineteenth century. The album included their two most recent singles, a few more songs arranged by Visconti, and three cover versions -- versions of Eddie Cochran's "Weekend", Moby Grape's "Hey Grandma", and the old standard "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", done copying the Coasters' arrangement with Bev Bevan taking a rare lead vocal. By this time there was a lot of dissatisfaction among the group. Most vocal -- or least vocal, because by this point he was no longer speaking to any of the other members, had been Ace Kefford. Kefford felt he was being sidelined in a band he'd formed and where he was the designated face of the group. He'd tried writing songs, but the only one he'd brought to the group, "William Chalker's Time Machine", had been rejected, and was eventually recorded by a group called The Lemon Tree, whose recording of it was co-produced by Burton and Andy Fairweather-Low of Amen Corner: [Excerpt: The Lemon Tree, "William Chalker's Time Machine"] He was also, though the rest of the group didn't realise it at the time, in the middle of a mental breakdown, which he later attributed to his overuse of acid. By the time the album, titled Move, came out, he'd quit the group. He formed a new group, The Ace Kefford Stand, with Cozy Powell on drums, and they released one single, a cover version of the Yardbirds' "For Your Love", which didn't chart: [Excerpt: The Ace Kefford Stand, "For Your Love"] Kefford recorded a solo album in 1968, but it wasn't released until an archival release in 2003, and he spent most of the next few decades dealing with mental health problems. The group continued on as a four-piece, with Burton moving over to bass. While they thought about what to do -- they were unhappy with Secunda's management, and with the sound that Cordell was getting from their recordings, which they considered far wimpier than their live sound -- they released a live EP of cover versions, recorded at the Marquee. The choice of songs for the EP showed their range of musical influences at the time, going from fifties rockabilly to the burgeoning progressive rock scene, with versions of Cochran's "Somethin' Else", Jerry Lee Lewis' "It'll Be Me", "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" by the Byrds, "Sunshine Help Me" by Spooky Tooth, and "Stephanie Knows Who" by Love: [Excerpt: The Move, "Stephanie Knows Who"] Incidentally, later that year they headlined a gig at the Royal Albert Hall with the Byrds as the support act, and Gram Parsons, who by that time was playing guitar for the Byrds, said that the Move did "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" better than the Byrds did. The EP, titled "Something Else From the Move", didn't do well commercially, but it did do something that the band thought important -- Trevor Burton in particular had been complaining that Denny Cordell's productions "took the toughness out" of the band's sound, and was worried that the group were being perceived as a pop band, not as a rock group like his friends in the Jimi Hendrix Experience or Cream. There was an increasing tension between Burton, who wanted to be a heavy rocker, and the older Wayne, who thought there was nothing at all wrong with being a pop band. The next single, "Wild Tiger Woman", was much more in the direction that Burton wanted their music to go. It was ostensibly produced by Cordell, but for the most part he left it to the band, and as a result it ended up as a much heavier track than normal. Roy Wood had only intended the song as an album track, and Bevan and Wayne were hesitant about it being a single, but Burton was insistent -- "Wild Tiger Woman" was going to be the group's first number one record: [Excerpt: The Move, "Wild Tiger Woman"] In fact, it turned out to be the group's first single not to chart at all, after four top ten singles in a row.  The group were now in crisis. They'd lost Ace Kefford, Burton and Wayne were at odds, and they were no longer guaranteed hitmakers. They decided to stop working with Cordell and Secunda, and made a commitment that if the next single was a flop, they would split up. In any case, Roy Wood was already thinking about another project. Even though the group's recent records had gone in a guitar-rock direction, he thought maybe you could do something more interesting. Ever since seeing Tony Visconti conduct orchestral instruments playing his music, he'd been thinking about it. As he later put it "I thought 'Well, wouldn't it be great to get a band together, and rather than advertising for a guitarist how about advertising for a cellist or a French horn player or something? There must be lots of young musicians around who play the... instruments that would like to play in a rock kind of band.' That was the start of it, it really was, and I think after those tracks had been recorded with Tony doing the orchestral arrangement, that's when I started to get bored with the Move, with the band, because I thought 'there's something more to it'". He'd started sketching out plans for an expanded lineup of the group, drawing pictures of what it would look like on stage if Carl Wayne was playing timpani while there were cello and French horn players on stage with them. He'd even come up with a name for the new group -- a multi-layered pun. The group would be a light orchestra, like the BBC Light Orchestra, but they would be playing electrical instruments, and also they would have a light show when they performed live, and so he thought "the Electric Light Orchestra" would be a good name for such a group. The other band members thought this was a daft idea, but Wood kept on plotting. But in the meantime, the group needed some new management. The person they chose was Don Arden. We talked about Arden quite a bit in the last episode, but he's someone who is going to turn up a lot in future episodes, and so it's best if I give a little bit more background about him. Arden was a manager of the old school, and like several of the older people in the music business at the time, like Dick James or Larry Page, he had started out as a performer, doing an Al Jolson tribute act, and he was absolutely steeped in showbusiness -- his wife had been a circus contortionist before they got married, and when he moved from Manchester to London their first home had been owned by Winifred Atwell, a boogie piano player who became the first Black person to have a UK number one -- and who is *still* the only female solo instrumentalist to have a UK number one -- with her 1954 hit "Let's Have Another Party": [Excerpt: WInifred Atwell, "Let's Have Another Party"] That was only Atwell's biggest in a long line of hits, and she'd put all her royalties into buying properties in London, one of which became the Ardens' home. Arden had been considered quite a promising singer, and had made a few records in the early 1950s. His first recordings, of material in Yiddish aimed at the Jewish market, are sadly not findable online, but he also apparently recorded as a session singer for Embassy Records. I can't find a reliable source for what records he sang on for that label, which put out budget rerecordings of hits for sale exclusively through Woolworths, but according to Wikipedia one of them was Embassy's version of "Blue Suede Shoes", put out under the group name "The Canadians", and the lead vocal on that track certainly sounds like it could be him: [Excerpt: The Canadians, "Blue Suede Shoes"] As you can tell, rock and roll didn't really suit Arden's style, and he wisely decided to get out of performance and into behind-the-scenes work, though he would still try on occasion to make records of his own -- an acetate exists from 1967 of him singing "Sunrise, Sunset": [Excerpt: Don Arden, "Sunrise, Sunset"] But he'd moved first into promotion -- he'd been the promoter who had put together tours of the UK for Gene Vincent, Little Richard, Brenda Lee and others which we mentioned in the second year of the podcast -- and then into management. He'd first come into management with the Animals -- apparently acting at that point as the money man for Mike Jeffries, who was the manager the group themselves dealt with. According to Arden -- though his story differs from the version of the story told by others involved -- the group at some point ditched Arden for Allen Klein, and when they did, Arden's assistant Peter Grant, another person we'll be hearing a lot more of, went with them.  Arden, by his own account, flew over to see Klein and threatened to throw him out of the window of his office, which was several stories up. This was a threat he regularly made to people he believed had crossed him -- he made a similar threat to one of the Nashville Teens, the first group he managed after the Animals, after the musician asked what was happening to the group's money. And as we heard last episode, he threatened Robert Stigwood that way when Stigwood tried to get the Small Faces off him. One of the reasons he'd signed the Small Faces was that Steve Marriott had gone to the Italia Conti school, where Arden had sent his own children, Sharon and David, and David had said that Marriott was talented. And David was also a big reason the Move came over to Arden. After the Small Faces had left him, Arden had bought Galaxy Entertaimnent, the booking agency that handled bookings for Amen Corner and the Move, among many other acts. Arden had taken over management of Amen Corner himself, and had put his son David in charge of liaising with Tony Secunda about the Move.  But David Arden was sure that the Move could be an albums act, not just a singles act, and was convinced the group had more potential than they were showing, and when they left Secunda, Don Arden took them on as his clients, at least for the moment. Secunda, according to Arden (who is not the most reliable of witnesses, but is unfortunately the only one we have for a lot of this stuff) tried to hire someone to assassinate Arden, but Arden quickly let Secunda know that if anything happened to Arden, Secunda himself would be dead within the hour. As "Wild Tiger Woman" hadn't been a hit, the group decided to go back to their earlier "Flowers in the Rain" style, with "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] That track was produced by Jimmy Miller, who was producing the Rolling Stones and Traffic around this time, and featured the group's friend Richard Tandy on harpsichord. It's also an example of the maxim "Good artists copy, great artists steal". There are very few more blatant examples of plagiarism in pop music than the middle eight of "Blackberry Way". Compare Harry Nilsson's "Good Old Desk": [Excerpt: Nilsson, "Good Old Desk"] to the middle eight of "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] "Blackberry Way" went to number one, but that was the last straw for Trevor Burton -- it was precisely the kind of thing he *didn't* want to be doing,. He was so sick of playing what he thought of as cheesy pop music that at one show he attacked Bev Bevan on stage with his bass, while Bevan retaliated with his cymbals. He stormed off stage, saying he was "tired of playing this crap". After leaving the group, he almost joined Blind Faith, a new supergroup that members of Cream and Traffic were forming, but instead formed his own supergroup, Balls. Balls had a revolving lineup which at various times included Denny Laine, formerly of the Moody Blues, Jackie Lomax, a singer-songwriter who was an associate of the Beatles, Richard Tandy who had played on "Blackberry Way", and Alan White, who would go on to drum with the band Yes. Balls only released one single, "Fight for My Country", which was later reissued as a Trevor Burton solo single: [Excerpt: Balls, "Fight For My Country"] Balls went through many lineup changes, and eventually seemed to merge with a later lineup of the Idle Race to become the Steve Gibbons Band, who were moderately successful in the seventies and eighties. Richard Tandy covered on bass for a short while, until Rick Price came in as a permanent replacement. Before Price, though, the group tried to get Hank Marvin to join, as the Shadows had then split up, and Wood was willing to move over to bass and let Marvin play lead guitar. Marvin turned down the offer though. But even though "Blackberry Way" had been the group's biggest hit to date, it marked a sharp decline in the group's fortunes.  Its success led Peter Walsh, the manager of Marmalade and the Tremeloes, to poach the group from Arden, and even though Arden took his usual heavy-handed approach -- he describes going and torturing Walsh's associate, Clifford Davis, the manager of Fleetwood Mac, in his autobiography -- he couldn't stop Walsh from taking over. Unfortunately, Walsh put the group on the chicken-in-a-basket cabaret circuit, and in the next year they only released one record, the single "Curly", which nobody was happy with. It was ostensibly produced by Mike Hurst, but Hurst didn't turn up to the final sessions and Wood did most of the production work himself, while in the next studio over Jimmy Miller, who'd produced "Blackberry Way", was producing "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones. The group were getting pigeonholed as a singles group, at a time when album artists were the in thing. In a three-year career they'd only released one album, though they were working on their second. Wood was by this point convinced that the Move was unsalvageable as a band, and told the others that the group was now just going to be a launchpad for his Electric Light Orchestra project. The band would continue working the chicken-in-a-basket circuit and releasing hit singles, but that would be just to fund the new project -- which they could all be involved in if they wanted, of course. Carl Wayne, on the other hand, was very, very, happy playing cabaret, and didn't see the need to be doing anything else. He made a counter-suggestion to Wood -- keep The Move together indefinitely, but let Wood do the Brian Wilson thing and stay home and write songs. Wayne would even try to get Burton and Kefford back into the band. But Wood wasn't interested. Increasingly his songs weren't even going to the Move at all. He was writing songs for people like Cliff Bennett and the Casuals. He wrote "Dance Round the Maypole" for Acid Gallery: [Excerpt: Acid Gallery, "Dance Round the Maypole"] On that, Wood and Jeff Lynne sang backing vocals. Wood and Lynne had been getting closer since Lynne had bought a home tape recorder which could do multi-tracking -- Wood had wanted to buy one of his own after "Flowers in the Rain", but even though he'd written three hit singles at that point his publishing company wouldn't give him an advance to buy one, and so he'd started using Lynne's. The two have often talked about how they'd recorded the demo for "Blackberry Way" at Lynne's parents' house, recording Wood's vocal on the demo with pillows and cushions around his head so that his singing wouldn't wake Lynne's parents. Lynne had been another person that Wood had asked to join the group when Burton left, but Lynne was happy with The Idle Race, where he was the main singer and songwriter, though their records weren't having any success: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "I Like My Toys"] While Wood was writing material for other people, the only one of those songs to become a hit was "Hello Suzie", written for Amen Corner, which became a top five single on Immediate Records: [Excerpt: Amen Corner, "Hello Suzie"] While the Move were playing venues like Batley Variety Club in Britain, when they went on their first US tour they were able to play for a very different audience. They were unknown in the US, and so were able to do shows for hippie audiences that had no preconceptions about them, and did things like stretch "Cherry Blossom Clinic" into an eight-minute-long extended progressive rock jam that incorporated bits of "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring", the Nutcracker Suite, and the Sorcerer's Apprentice: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited (live at the Fillmore West)"] All the group were agreed that those shows were the highlight of the group's career. Even Carl Wayne, the band member most comfortable with them playing the cabaret circuit, was so proud of the show at the Fillmore West which that performance is taken from that when the tapes proved unusable he kept hold of them, hoping all his life that technology would progress to the point where they could be released and show what a good live band they'd been, though as things turned out they didn't get released until after his death. But when they got back to the UK it was back to the chicken-in-a-basket circuit, and back to work on their much-delayed second album. That album, Shazam!, was the group's attempt at compromise between their different visions. With the exception of one song, it's all heavy rock music, but Wayne, Wood, and Price all co-produced, and Wayne had the most creative involvement he'd ever had. Side two of the album was all cover versions, chosen by Wayne, and Wayne also went out onto the street and did several vox pops, asking members of the public what they thought of pop music: [Excerpt: Vox Pops from "Don't Make My Baby Blue"] There were only six songs on the album, because they were mostly extended jams. Other than the three cover versions chosen by Wayne, there was a sludge-metal remake of "Hello Suzie", the new arrangement of "Cherry Blossom Clinic" they'd been performing live, retitled "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited", and only one new original, "Beautiful Daughter", which featured a string arrangement by Visconti, who also played bass: [Excerpt: The Move, "Beautiful Daughter"] And Carl Wayne sang lead on five of the six tracks, which given that one of the reasons Wayne was getting unhappy with the band was that Wood was increasingly becoming the lead singer, must have been some comfort. But it wasn't enough. By the time Shazam! came out, with a cover drawn by Mike Sheridan showing the four band members as superheroes, the band was down to three -- Carl Wayne had quit the group, for a solo career. He continued playing the cabaret circuit, and made records, but never had another hit, but he managed to have a very successful career as an all-round entertainer, acting on TV and in the theatre, including a six-year run as the narrator in the musical Blood Brothers, and replacing Alan Clarke as the lead singer of the Hollies. He died in 2004. As soon as Wayne left the group, the three remaining band members quit their management and went back to Arden. And to replace Wayne, Wood once again asked Jeff Lynne to join the group. But this time the proposition was different -- Lynne wouldn't just be joining the Move, but he would be joining the Electric Light Orchestra. They would continue putting out Move records and touring for the moment, and Lynne would be welcome to write songs for the Move so that Wood wouldn't have to be the only writer, but they'd be doing it while they were planning their new group.  Lynne was in, and the first single from the new lineup was a return to the heavy riff rock style of "Wild Tiger Woman", "Brontosaurus": [Excerpt: The Move, "Brontosaurus"] But Wayne leaving the group had put Wood in a difficult position. He was now the frontman, and he hated that responsibility -- he said later "if you look at me in photos of the early days, I'm always the one hanging back with my head down, more the musician than the frontman." So he started wearing makeup, painting his face with triangles and stars, so he would be able to hide his shyness. And it worked -- and "Brontosaurus" returned the group to the top ten. But the next single, "When Alice Comes Back to the Farm", didn't chart at all. The first album for the new Move lineup, Looking On, was to finish their contract with their current record label. Many regard it as the group's "Heavy metal album", and it's often considered the worst of their four albums, with Bev Bevan calling it "plodding", but that's as much to do with Bevan's feeling about the sessions as anything else -- increasingly, after the basic rhythm tracks had been recorded, Wood and Lynne would get to work without the other two members of the band, doing immense amounts of overdubbing.  And that continued after Looking On was finished. The group signed a new contract with EMI's new progressive rock label, Harvest, and the contract stated that they were signing as "the Move performing as The Electric Light Orchestra". They started work on two albums' worth of material, with the idea that anything with orchestral instruments would be put aside for the first Electric Light Orchestra album, while anything with just guitar, bass, drums, keyboard, and horns would be for the Move. The first Electric Light Orchestra track, indeed, was intended as a Move B-side. Lynne came in with a song based around a guitar riff, and with lyrics vaguely inspired by the TV show The Prisoner, about someone with a number instead of a name running, trying to escape, and then eventually dying.  But then Wood decided that what the track really needed was cello. But not cello played in the standard orchestral manner, but something closer to what the Beatles had done on "I am the Walrus". He'd bought a cheap cello himself, and started playing Jimi Hendrix riffs on it, and Lynne loved the sound of it, so onto the Move's basic rhythm track they overdubbed fifteen cello tracks by Wood, and also two French horns, also by Wood: [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "10538 Overture"] The track was named "10538 Overture", after they saw the serial number 1053 on the console they were using to mix the track, and added the number 8 at the end, making 10538 the number of the character in the song. Wood and Lynne were so enamoured with the sound of their new track that they eventually got told by the other two members of the group that they had to sit in the back when the Move were driving to gigs, so they couldn't reach the tape player, because they'd just keep playing the track over and over again. So they got a portable tape player and took that into the back seat with them to play it there. After finishing some pre-existing touring commitments, the Move and Electric Light Orchestra became a purely studio group, and Rick Price quit the bands -- he needed steady touring work to feed his family, and went off to form another band, Mongrel. Around this time, Wood also took part in another strange project. After Immediate Records collapsed, Andrew Oldham needed some fast money, so he and Don Arden put together a fake group they could sign to EMI for ten thousand pounds.  The photo of the band Grunt Futtock was of some random students, and that was who Arden and Oldham told EMI was on the track, but the actual performers on the single included Roy Wood, Steve Marriott, Peter Frampton, and Andy Bown, the former keyboard player of the Herd: [Excerpt: Grunt Futtock, "Rock 'n' Roll Christian"] Nobody knows who wrote the song, although it's credited to Bernard Webb, which is a pseudonym Paul McCartney had previously used -- but everyone knew he'd used the pseudonym, so it could very easily be a nod to that. The last Move album, Message From The Country, didn't chart -- just like the previous two hadn't. But Wood's song "Tonight" made number eleven, the follow-up, "Chinatown", made number twenty-three, and then the final Move single, "California Man", a fifties rock and roll pastiche, made the top ten: [Excerpt: The Move, "California Man"] In the US, that single was flipped, and the B-side, Lynne's song "Do Ya", became the only Move song ever to make the Hot One Hundred, reaching number ninety-nine: [Excerpt: The Move, "Do Ya"] By the time "California Man" was released, the Electric Light Orchestra were well underway. They'd recorded their first album, whose biggest highlights were Lynne's "10538 Overture" and Wood's "Whisper in the Night": [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "Whisper in the Night"] And they'd formed a touring lineup, including Richard Tandy on keyboards and several orchestral instrumentalists. Unfortunately, there were problems developing between Wood and Lynne. When the Electric Light Orchestra toured, interviewers only wanted to speak to Wood, thinking of him as the band leader, even though Wood insisted that he and Lynne were the joint leaders. And both men had started arguing a lot, to the extent that at some shows they would refuse to go on stage because of arguments as to which of them should go on first. Wood has since said that he thinks most of the problems between Lynne and himself were actually caused by Don Arden, who realised that if he split the two of them into separate acts he could have two hit groups, not one. If that was the plan, it worked, because by the time "10538 Overture" was released as the Electric Light Orchestra's first single, and made the top ten -- while "California Man" was also still in the charts -- it was announced that Roy Wood was now leaving the Electric Light Orchestra, as were keyboard playe

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The Shipper's Toolbox by Refund Retriever
2023 UPS Accessorial Rate Increase, Part 1

The Shipper's Toolbox by Refund Retriever

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 4:09


UPS announced the 2023 rate increase going into effect on December 27, 2022. Incidentally, the 2023 UPS accessorial fees are a considerable part of every shipper's weekly billing. Subsequently, the UPS ground and air rates will increase by an average of 6.9%. UPS Air Freight rates for the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico will increase by an average of 6.2%. The UPS late payment fee will increase from 6% to 8% Read More Since 2006, Refund Retriever has been auditing FedEx and UPS packages for late deliveries and billing mistakes. We assist shippers in maximizing carrier discounts and achieving best-in-class pricing through a complete logistics analysis. Are you paying too much for your shipping? Refund Retriever also offers a solution to all your Amazon FBA reimbursement problems. We manually check the whole inventory lifecycle to guarantee all inventory is available for sale. To learn more about FedEx/UPS auditing, contract negotiation, or Amazon FBA reimbursement services, visit: https://zurl.co/ZUqV

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass
Incidentally Christmas: Cobra

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 114:28


This week, we're talking about Tucker's pick for Incidentally Christmas, Cobra. Christmas is the disease and Cobra is the cure? For updates on which movie we're watching next follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cbkapod Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass is part of the EaseDrop Podcast Network Also, if you don't mind leaving us a review on your podcast app, that would be sweet. Support Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/chew-bubblegum-and-kick-ass

The RETROZEST Podcast
127: SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT - 45th Anniversary Part 2! - With Special Guest, CAYE JONES BARNETT!

The RETROZEST Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 69:04


On Episode 127 of the RETROZEST podcast, Curtis continues the celebration the 45th anniversary of SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT (which was started on episode #101)! This film is a 1977 American road action comedy starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams and Mike Henry. Assisting Curtis in this endeavor is a very special guest; CAYE JONES BARNETT! Caye portrayed "Caye Snow", the eldest daughter of Cledus "Snowman" Snow. She was chosen for the part because the house (exterior and interior) which was used as the home of Snowman's family on North Avenue in Jonesboro, GA was actually where Caye and her family lived at the time! She is now a semi-regular guest for East Bound and Down: The Ultimate Smokey and the Bandit Tribute. Check out their Website and their Facebook Page. Additionally, Mr. Retrovere shares this week's Retro News segment. For a more detailed documentary about Smokey and the Bandit, check out THE BANDIT on Amazon Video! Incidentally, you may help the RetroZest podcast by purchasing a unique SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT T-Shirt or two (many different designs and colors!) from our store at store.retrozest.com/smokey. You may also help the RetroZest Podcast by purchasing a Celebrity Video Message gift for a friend/family member from CelebVM! Choose from celebrities like Barry Williams, Gary Busey, Ernie Hudson, Robert Fripp, Right Said Fred, etc.! Simply enter their website through our portal store.retrozest.com/celebvm, and shop as you normally would; it's no extra cost to you at all! Contact Curtis at podcast@retrozest.com, or via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Also, check us out on TikTok!

The Todd Herman Show
Denying Globalist control over America is stupid. Ep_515_Hr-2

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 56:02


THE THESIS: The United States is radically influenced by, if not controlled by, globalists; people who want global control over all facts of life. This is not the least bit hidden, nor is it hard to understand if you will stand in truth. The patterns are far too clear, the policies and positions far too uniform, the techniques of terrifying people to control them universal, breathless and insane charges of disinformation being made from liars is absolute. THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES: Even the most brilliant, well-educated people can be made blind to what is right in front of themThe spiritual blindness of the Pharisees and how we can avoid it (a good article with an annoying cartoon at the top, page down for the content). Was the accusation of Jesus true?Jesus, the Great Physician, again and again revealed his diagnosis of the Pharisees' spiritual disability:“Though seeing, they do not see; though hearing, they do not hear or understand. In them is fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah: ‘You will be ever hearing but never understanding; you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.'” – Matthew 13:13-14 (parallels: Mark 4:12; Luke 8:10)Leave them; they are blind guides. If the blind lead the blind, both will fall into a pit. – Matthew 15:14For judgment I have come into this world, so that the blind will see and those who see will become blind…. If you were blind, you would not be guilty of sin; but not that you claim you can see, your guilt remains. – John 9:39, 41Woe to you, blind guides! … You blind fools! … You blind men! … You blind guides! – Matthew 23:16, 17, 19, 24You are going to have the light just a little while longer. Walk while you have the light, before darkness overtakes you. Whoever walks in the dark does not know where they are going. Believe in the light while you have the light, so that you may become children of light. – John 12:35-36THE NEWS & COMMENT:Corruption like this is global. The same people who demand we turn down our thermostats and carpool are self-dealing and raiding our treasuries. Certainly, this is part of our sin condition. But, there are no punishments and people have been programmed to simply accept that the bosses get to act this way. [AUDIO] - The video that started it all. In 2012, Speaker Pelosi was asked if she thought there was a conflict of interest in her Husband getting a favorable stock deal in the Visa IPO. This was her response:All over The West, countries have somehow forgotten how to secure their borders. It just slipped their collective minds. Or, it is part of a pattern to radically redistribute people who, sadly and brutally, have been conditioned to view government as parent and provider. [AUDIO] - Joe Biden visits Arizona & accidentally confirms what we all knew: he does not care one bit about the Border Crisis.Reporter: “Why would you visit our state and not visit the border?”Sleepy Joe: “There are more important things going on”[AUDIO] - Protests spreading throughout Ireland tonight over illegal immigrants being bussed into hotels and other accommodation under the cover of darkness as the Irish are left to rot. This is one lady rallying the residents of Tallaght tonight.[AUDIO] - Tucker Carlson: "This is real. This is happening. No one is stopping it. Republicans are colluding to allow it to continue."Also a unanimous pattern in the West: borders don't matter. UNLESS it's Ukraine's border. [AUDIO] - Secretary of State Blinken implies that U.S. support of Ukraine will continue even if public support wanes, because the U.S. does foreign policy based on national interest, not "policy by polls" @DailyCallerThis is universal with the elites: clear, unambiguous facts are “CoNspIraCCy ThEorieZ!” Every Western nation is using the technique and it is 100% purposeful. They want us confused and uncertain so they can swoop in from their jets to rescue us. Stand in God's Truth. This pattern is also stamped all over the West--but, not in China, even though the CCP is pushing sexualization of kids in the West. Yoel was effectively Twitter's chief censor. His PhD thesis suggested that the same-sex hook-up app, Grindr, should allow kids. That is, apparently, Yoel's worldview. Increasingly, it is the worldview of The Party bosses. Incidentally, people are now accusing us of being “dangerous” and “inciting to violence” for merely publicizing what Yoel himself published and promoted. In nearly every Western Country, medical technocrats have been allowed to seize unthinkable powers. The parents of “Baby W” simply wanted blood not tainted by the mRNA injections for their baby. The hospitals had it available, but they decided to kidnap the child instead of respecting the wishes of the parents. [AUDIO] - Distressing footage of Baby W being taken away last night for pre-op checks in the presence of 4 officers enforcing the High Court Order after brick walls were thrown up by his parents. Protesters have since vilified police accusing them of taking part in a ‘violent kidnapping'.Pushing gender confusion and gender rebellion is now a religion in “health” care. It is universal to The West . . . but, not in China even though the CCP pushes it on countries like ours. [AUDIO] - This is a doctor. She wants everyone in the medical industry to focus on pronouns. These are our healthcare professionals.It is now becoming universal that people who, in my opinion, are quite clearly mentally ill are being allowed to run important aspects of government.Until he was fired on Tuesday, for the two felony charges he faces for allegedly stealing women's expensive bags, this man had been allowed to oversee the handling of America's nuclear waste. Since he tries (quite unsuccessfully) to steal women's identities, that is not a shock. Yes, it is a real article from October, 2015We can all see the global push to drive up the cost of beef by limiting the supply. Here, we see the same type of lies about beef and cheese that Gates-funded entities continue to make about the mRNA. There is no world in which CocoPuffs are healthier than beef. But, Bill Gates paid “scientists” to pretend otherwise. Gates-funded study claims candy is healthier than beefThe National Cattlemen's Beef Association is condemning as flawed the Food Compass study funded in part by alternative meat promoter Bill Gates.The Food Compass nutrient profiling system scores foods from best to worst on a scale of 0 to 100, ranking products like peanut M&Ms, Coco Puffs and potato chips as more healthful than beef.“The idea that M&Ms, potato chips and cereal are somehow healthier than natural beef ignores scientific evidence and frankly doesn't measure up to logic,” said Colin Woodall, NCBA CEO.“These snack foods are high in sugar, carbohydrates and fats, while beef is a nutrient-rich food that provides essential protein, iron, zinc and numerous B vitamins,” he said“Scientists” pretend junk food is healthy while “mayors” pretend letting people shoot-up heroin and fentanyl helps society[AUDIO] - South Philly mom tears into officials for allowing a drug injection site in their neighborhood without informing residentsOnly some protests are allowed, others will be crushed. [AUDIO] - ‘TRUDEAU' - Will increase Police powers to stop ‘illegal' protests.Regardless of how annoying you think some protests are, remember this, the only protests that will be ‘legal' will be the ones in support of the government. How very Canada.

The RETROZEST Podcast
126: RIP Legends! - A Celebration of Irene Cara, Clarence Gilyard Jr., Christine McVie & Kirstie Alley

The RETROZEST Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 21:28


On Episode 126 (a BONUS episode) of the RETROZEST podcast, Curtis and Mr. Retrovere celebrate the lives and careers of the very recently departed legendary celebrities Irene Cara, Clarence Gilyard Jr., Christine McVie and Kirstie Alley. Incidentally, you may also help the RetroZest Podcast by purchasing a Celebrity Video Message gift for a friend/family member from CelebVM! Choose from celebrities like Barry Williams, Gary Busey, Ernie Hudson, Robert Fripp, Right Said Fred, etc.! Simply enter their website through our portal at store.retrozest.com/celebvm, and shop as you normally would; it's no extra cost to you at all! Contact Curtis at podcast@retrozest.com, or via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Also, check us out on TikTok!

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass
Incidentally Christmas: Three Days of The Condor

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 79:21


What do you get when you cross sweet outfits, a government conspiracy, a problematic romance, and just a dash of Christmas? Well, you get Brett's pick for this series, Three Days of The Condor. Is it Christmas-y enough to be Incidentally Christmas? Will it be enough to take down Shane Black? Listen and find out! For updates on which movie we're watching next follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cbkapod Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass is part of the EaseDrop Podcast Network Also, if you don't mind leaving us a review on your podcast app, that would be sweet. Support Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/chew-bubblegum-and-kick-ass

The RETROZEST Podcast
125: JAMIE BENNING (of "Filmumentaries") Interview!

The RETROZEST Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 65:36


On Episode 125 of the RETROZEST podcast, Curtis interviews film historian JAMIE BENNING of Filmumentaries.com! As well as creating his own videos and podcasts, Jamie works as a live editor in sports television. For the most part that has meant traveling the world for twenty years visiting dozens of countries, experiencing new cultures and of course enjoying lots of exotic food. Jamie has produced several excellent "Filmumentaries", including Inside Jaws, Star Wars Begins, Returning to Jedi, and Raiding the Lost Ark. His podcast, The Filmumentaries Podcast, contains knowledgeable in-depth conversations between Jamie and some of the greatest artists in all the movie making crafts from effects to editing, stunts to storyboards. Famed Art Director and Production Designer JOE ALVES, whom Curtis interviewed on RetroZest #121, is the focus of an upcoming official documentary created by Jamie and his colleagues entitled Not Your Average Joe. A Kickstarter for this project has been created which will expire on December 20, 2022. Please consider contributing so Joe's exhaustive career story (including his involvement with films like Forbidden Planet, Sleeping Beauty, Jaws, Jaws 2, Jaws 3-D, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Escape From New York) can be told in great detail! Follow Jamie on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Patreon! There's also an Instagram specifically for the Joe Alves documentary HERE. Additionally, Mr. Retrovere shares this episode's Retro News segment. Incidentally, you may help the podcast by purchasing a JAWS or CE3K themed T-shirt or two (many different designs and colors!) from our store at store.retrozest.com/jaws and store.retrozest.com/CE3K. You may also browse our entire store at store.retrozest.com/home. You may also help the RetroZest Podcast by purchasing a Celebrity Video Message gift for a friend/family member from CelebVM! Choose from celebrities like Barry Williams, Gary Busey, Ernie Hudson, Robert Fripp, Right Said Fred, etc.! Simply enter their website through our portal at store.retrozest.com/celebvm, and shop as you normally would; it's no extra cost to you at all! Contact Curtis at podcast@retrozest.com, or via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Also, check us out on TikTok!

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Artificial Intelligence through Robots

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 9:57


Everyone has heard about how AI will one day take over our jobs, the rise of the robots and technology singularity, where the world will be taken over by machines, as they will be the ones controlling our lives. Sounds like the plot of an epic sci-fi movie or novel? It's not something new, as these scenarios are common when it comes to Hollywood scripts. However, the industrial and academic research has indicated that machine learning isn't as close to reaching such an all-encompassing and overarching state. It's definitely not at the point, where it has the ability to overpower all forms of human intelligence. The question then remains regarding where does artificial intelligence currently stand in robotics and today's world? What are the greatest and latest research breakthroughs? What should be expected in the near future? These are all important questions and all pertain to answers related to the state of AI robotics in 2022. So, without further ado, let's get into it! What Is Robotics? What's the first thing that comes to your mind whenever you hear anyone mention the word “robot”? Are you picturing metallic humanoids in spaceships in a galaxy far away? It could be that you start imagining a dystopian future where robot overlords have enslaved humanity. Or it could be that you start thinking about assembly lines for automobiles, where machine robots are putting cars together. In spite of what you think about robotics, there is one thing that everyone can agree to and that is: robots are here and they will be a part of our lives for better or worse. The good news though is that robots will most likely be doing dangerous or repetitive tasks instead of seizing executive power and ruling supremely over humans. To define and classify the term, robotics is an engineering branch dealing with the design, application, operation, usage, construction, and conception of robots. If you dig a little deeper, you'll notice that the literal definition of robots is machines that are automatically operated and carry out multiple actions independently to complete work accomplished by humans usually. Incidentally, even though robots don't have to resemble humans, some of them do. You can check out images of assembly lines for automobiles as proof of that. Many robots that resemble humans are called ‘androids' in general. Even though most robot designers try to ensure that their creations tend to appear like a human being, so that people can be comfortable around them, it's not something that many agree with. That's because a large majority of people believe that robots, particularly the ones resembling people are downright creepy. What's the State of Robotics in 2022? In 2022, AI robotics technology has advanced significantly compared to 2020. Robotics have become an integral part of daily life for many people. Self-driving cars are now available as a consumer product in some countries and autonomous robots are used for tasks ranging from cleaning and security to healthcare and entertainment. In the workplace, robots are being deployed to automate manual labor and streamline production processes. AI has also been integrated into robotics systems to enable enhanced decision making capabilities. This allows for faster reaction times, better accuracy, and improved safety measures when handling complex tasks such as manufacturing or surgery. AI has been used to develop more comprehensive algorithms that can learn from their environment like never before. Robots can now understand commands given by humans in natural language instead of a set of preprogrammed instructions. That enables them to respond to changing situations quickly and accurately, making them more versatile than ever before. Autonomous robots are also being used for search and rescue operations thanks to their ability to navigate dangerous environments safely. AI robotics technology has become so advanced that it is now being used in space exploration programs. Robotic probes ha...

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass
Incidentally Christmas: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 81:50


We're blasting into the holidays with our first film in our Incidentally Christmas series, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. It's a Shane Black movie, and so there's gotta be some Christmas stuff happening throughout, but no one in this flick is finding the Christmas spirit, just dead bodies and stuff like that. Happy holidays, Shitters! For updates on which movie we're watching next follow us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cbkapod Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass is part of the EaseDrop Podcast Network Also, if you don't mind leaving us a review on your podcast app, that would be sweet. Support Chew Bubblegum and Kick Ass by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/chew-bubblegum-and-kick-ass

3 Minute Japanese
お金と漢字 ー Money and Kanji ー 金&gold

3 Minute Japanese

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 6:15


ポッドキャストをお聞きの皆さん、こんにちは。3分日本語のお時間です。 Hello, everyone. Welcome or welcome back to 3-minute Japanese. 前回に引き続き、お金をテーマにお送りしています。 We are staying with the topic, which is money. 前回予告した通り、漢字の観点からお金を考えたいと思います。 As I stated in the previous episode, we would like to talk about money from the views of kanji, Chinese characters. First 2 kanjis are gold and silver. In this episode, we will look at gold. まず、「金」・「銀」の漢字を見ていきましょう。今回は「金」に注目したいと思います。 「金」が使われる代表的な単語は、以下の通りです。 The kanji for gold is used in the following words, 「お金」 “money”, 「金運」“luck with money”, and 「金利」“interest rate” In German, money is das Geld, yellow is gelp, and gold is das Gold. The sounds for yellow and gold are quite similar. Incidentally, the words for colors gold and yellow, 「金色」and 「黄色」are believed to be related. ドイツ語でお金はdas Geld、黄色はgelp、金は英語と同様das Goldで非常に音が似ていますが、関連語と考えられています。因みに日本語で金色と黄色も同様、関連語とみられています。 It is natural to see that gold and money are interchangeable in many languages. 「金」と「お金」は多くの言語において代替的に使われていることが分かります。 That's it for today. In the next episode, we will talk about the connection between silver and money. Stay tuned. はい、今日はここまでです。次回は銀とお金のつながりをテーマにお送りします。お楽しみに。 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/juliasachiko/message

The RETROZEST Podcast
124: PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES - 35th Anniversary Part 2 - With Special Guests JOHN & HEIDI SMALL!

The RETROZEST Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:34


On Episode 124 of the RETROZEST podcast, Curtis continues the Thanksgiving 2022 season with the second of two episodes celebrating the 35th Anniversary of John Hughes' PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES. This 1987 film features Steve Martin as the tense marketing exec Neal Page and John Candy as the kind-hearted but bothersome shower curtain ring salesman Del Griffith. Despite their disagreements, they travel together on a three-day journey of mishaps in an effort to return Neal to Chicago from NYC in time for Thanksgiving dinner with his family. Assisting in this endeavor are two very special guests; JOHN & HEIDI SMALL (owners of Sunny Radio in Sioux Falls, SD). John and Heidi have recently been involved in their own celebration of PTA. They've done some great giveaways in conjunction with Fathom events, and more importantly, they've reproduced the severely damaged and burnt Marathon Rental Car which, in the film, was used to get Del Griffith and Neal Page from St. Louis to just within 100 miles of Chicago; until the car was impounded of course. This reproduction of the car was driven by John and Heidi in a parade or two, as well as all around the Sioux Falls metro area. John dressed up as Del Griffith (complete with the single red glove) and Heidi dressed as Neal Page. Find out more about the car at themoviecar.com. Follow John & Heidi on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Additionally, our announcer Mr. Retrovere shares this episode's RETRO NEWS segment, as well as LANDMARK CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS for the month of November 2022. Incidentally, you may help the podcast by purchasing a PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES T-Shirt or two (many different designs and colors!) from our store at store.retrozest.com/PTA. You may also browse our entire store at store.retrozest.com/home. You may also help the RetroZest Podcast by purchasing a Celebrity Video Message gift for a friend/family member from CelebVM! Choose from celebrities like Barry Williams, Gary Busey, Ernie Hudson, Robert Fripp, Right Said Fred, etc.! Simply enter their website through our portal at store.retrozest.com/celebvm, and shop as you normally would; it's no extra cost to you at all! Contact Curtis at podcast@retrozest.com, or via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Also, check us out on TikTok!

3Sixty Insights
#HRTechChat Explores isolved's Acquisition of AAP

3Sixty Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 29:45


This past summer, isolved acquired AAP, an administrative services organization (ASO) and significant member of isolved's large network of similar companies using isolved's software-as-a-service solution for human capital management to carry out part or all of HR for their clients. Demonstrating why AAP is an especially good match for the vendor, this in-network acquisition underscores several of isolved's strengths. Joining me on the video podcast to explain were Andy Osborne, who was CEO of AAP for 20 years, and Lina Tonk, who has been with isolved for many years herself, becoming the organization's chief marketing officer shortly after her previous appearance on #HRTechChat. This acquisition of AAP reflects an important element of isolved's growth strategy. Bringing members of this network fully under the isolved brand is typically smooth and straightforward for these ASOs, professional employer organizations (PEOs), payroll service bureaus, and similar providers. Already using isolved's solution, they see business tending to continue as usual, and easily, for their clients. In the process, isolved grows in a highly sustainable way. In recent years isolved has built a wraparound ecosystem designed to cultivate this network. Firsthand, I've witnessed extra-exemplary ASOs and PEOs et al. from this network receive public recognition at isolved's annual user conference. As for AAP, infusing its culture into isolved's proved intuitive, a natural step benefiting from the strength of relationships between leaders at both organization. "Andy and I go way back," Lina said. "From the moment they deployed the isolved platform, I remember thinking, 'They will be such a good fit for us. And, when he made the decision to move into an acquisition with us, we knew that he had checked every single box to ask, 'Are my customers going to be okay? Is my team going to be okay?' They built such a strong culture for their customers that, as we transfer them through, you can see it; you can live and breathe it." Lina's words make lots of sense as you hear Andy speak of looking past just the paycheck. "We see through the paycheck. We look past the electronic file. We try to take into consideration every day, what we did that impacted the person behind what was printed on the check or what was in an electronic file. We want to understand the impact if we didn't get our job right. If we missed the child support or the direct deposit, you know that those things are key. That is the culture that we built." The story of AAP's relationship with isolved is a powerful anecdote speaking not only to the cultural fit between the two, but also the usability and capability of the vendor's cloud software for HCM. "We started reviewing the software options that were out there in 2014," Andy said. "The platform that we were on at the time was not meeting client demand. It was not evolving and developing at the speed that the market required." In 2016, AAP made the selection to move to the isolved platform, "which checked all the boxes for all of the things that we needed." So superior was isolved for AAP's needs that, just to be sure, Andy asked his team to re-analyze all the isolved competitors that AAP had considered. "After two reviews of everybody else, isolved still came out as the clear front runner." Incidentally, one of those needs stemmed from Andy's decision early in his tenure as CEO at AAP to target quick-service restaurants (QSRs), a vertical market that eventually accounted for approximately 65 percent of AAP's client base. This aligns with goals at isolved, which targets QSRs, too, with a solution especially well-tailored for their challenges in HCM. As usual, the blog entry captures only a sliver of the depth of thought and conversation on display on the #HRTechChat video podcast. Do yourselves a favor and watch this episode, a very deep dive into what it takes to make an acquisition of this kind successful.